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Discussion Starter #1
I have been a subscriber to Motorcycle Consumer News for a few years and recently saw an article by David Hough in the Nov. 2016 issue that stated that "around 4,000" motorcyclists per year are killed on US roads. That's about 80 deaths per state and a little over 6 per month. David further states that motorcycle drivers are 35 times more likely to die in a fatal accident than car drivers. Holy Smokes, I knew this was a dangerous sport but never realized just how dangerous. I feel lucky to have survived 61 years of this sport I love.

Be careful my friends, Will
 

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As I contemplate teaching my wife and daughter how to ride I have to keep in mind how much I want to initially scare them with my MC philosophy of "always ride like everyone is out to kill you" and "think of yourself as invisible to all other drivers on the road" (as in Gee, I didn't see him/her).
Sounds terrible but living around NYC most of my life and surviving (so far) on 2 & 3 wheels since I was 16 you get used to more driving crazies bunched together to tightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
In England it's called a SMIDSY......sorry mate, I didn't see you. I've read that if you see a vehicle ready to pull out in front of you, you should start weaving from one side of your lane to the other. The theory is that you attract more attention that way. Someone told me recently they suggest that for bicyclists as well.
 

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I saw a video about SMIDSY, and have been weaving like a drunken sailor when I ride.
It works.
The people who see you think you are crazy and keep away from you.



In England it's called a SMIDSY......sorry mate, I didn't see you. I've read that if you see a vehicle ready to pull out in front of you, you should start weaving from one side of your lane to the other. The theory is that you attract more attention that way. Someone told me recently they suggest that for bicyclists as well.
 

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williamemack;457434].... Holy Smokes, I knew this was a dangerous sport but never realized just how dangerous...
Yeah, and it's a whole lot more dangerous if you ride a Harley and never take a motorcycle safety course! :eek: ;)

A safe rider's philosophy is to see and identify threats as soon as possible and take action. You can't do this effectively if you have never encountered nor thought about what sort of threats you might see, other than the obvious left turner or stop sign runner. This is why books like David Hough's are SO worth reading. I had been riding on and off for 50 years when I first read one of his books and I thought "WOW!, I didn't know that!" about every 10 pages. I bought a couple of his other books and re-read them every spring.

Just telling new riders that they should assume every cager is out to kill them isn't nearly enough. They have to be taught, via courses or books, all the myriad ways that this can happen (as well as accidents they could have all by themselves), and what clues will help them identify these specific threats and learn almost automatic responses thought out well in advance to avoid them. Experienced riders play a whole lot of "what if" games in their minds while riding. :confused: :eek:
 

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Wear a gun. Other drivers can see that even though they are half a mile away.
They can't see a motorcycle but they can see a gun.
True, I can attest to that:

IMG_3787.JPG
 

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I agree with a lot of what is said here. I have always ride with my head on a swivel and tend to ride defensively aggressive where i do not ever stay near where problems can occur. So far i have only one close call in all my years, i have been lucky. My close call was just thins summer and if i was on my other bike and not the TW i think i would have been in an accident. Because the TW is so deft and maneuverable i was able to swerve and hop a sidewalk to avoid hitting a car that had just turned in front of me with feet to spare. On my Duc my only recourse would have been to grab the brakes and hope....

I totally agree with the safety classes too. Back when my girlfriend took hers( funny this comes up from Will since i was working on his carb the day she took the class) she was the only person that showed up with proper safety gear, not a single other rider has a proper jacket or pants. They all had helmets and gloves but that's it. I guarantee most where there to fulfill the license requirement so they could ditch the dot helmet for a brain bucket and get on their Harley with shorts and flip-flops, they we not there to learn. The instructor used her as an example of what to wear and why and after i left Wills and went to pick her up they used me as another example since i was in full gear. I walked in the room while class was wrapping up and the instructor pointed at me and said see folks, guys wear gear too.... We then rode off 2 up on a TW... lol

Since she has taken her class i still give her a lot of feedback, i tend to ride behind her on the street and point out dangerous things that i see that she misses and point them out right way over our comm system. She has become a more aware rider which is what i want her to be.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
While we're on the subject of SMIDSYs and weaving back and forth in your lane, this is a practice I employ when I am on secondary country roads in NH on my tractor on my way to a mowing job. I have a SMV triangle on the back and my 4 way flashers going, but cars don't seem to slow down much and when they do get stuck behind me I try to pull over when it's safe. Often drivers get ants in their pants and try to pass in very dangerous situations like when cresting a blind hill. If a car should be coming the opposite direction, I suspect it would be me that gets sacrificed. So what I do is drive like an unpredictable drunken sailor, swerving left and right so folks are afraid to pass. Works like a charm...so far.
 
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I wonder how many of the 4,000 died under the influence of alcohol
More likely the Alcohol inhaled by the Car Drivers.... :triumphant:
 
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Wear a gun. Other drivers can see that even though they are half a mile away.
They can't see a motorcycle but they can see a gun.
Shoulder holsters are best for this in my opinion!
And I traditionally wear a green vest with reflective stripes and you also gotta watch out,
Just the other day a woman starts to pull out which would block the road as she will be pulling out across the lane to make a left,
She gauges my speed and distance and pulls out causing me to grind to a halt including some rear wheel lock up,
All the while she's looking at me,
I turn to have a word with her and she states that I had room to stop ! ! ! ! ! !
SHE WAS FRIGGIN PULLING OUT of a parking lot,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, and I had the right of way ! ! !
Patience I tell myself,
when I really wanted to pull her impolite self from her car and beat her unconscious,
Instead I took a pic of her license place to her dismay, And I went to finish my errands,
Here in the phil a metro area people will pull out in front of you, Stop you, Run stop signs and mere because they see a motorcycle and don't feel threatened by you,,,, Philadelphia is a rough area,
A few minutes into the country is a different mind set and accidents are accidents,
No matter, This is why you gotta wear a shoulder holster and...
Simply put,
You really got to be careful.
Stay safe ! !
 

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My guess calculating percentages of the 4,000 deaths. What's Yours?

40% sports bike riders acting like fools
20% under the influence of alcohol
20% other motorists errors
10% Rookies first two years
5% mechanical failure
5% Obstacles
 
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