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Thinking about this kept me up last night so I thought I'd give it a try today.

For those of you who feel compelled to check for oil flow to your head after an oil and filter change (I am not one of those), here is something that would provide a positive visual indicator of oil flow.

I drilled a hole through a socket head bolt and found a piece of vinyl tubing that kind of fit into the socket.

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Here is it installed on the engine.

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Here is the proof of oil flow. This oil drains back down when you shut the engine off.

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While this first generation prototype was successful to prove out this concept, it is less than ideal. If you want to try this out and have a more practical and functional gauge, here is what I suggest. Cut the head off of a longer bolt and drill a smaller hole through it than I did above. (Unfortunately my wobbly drill press is not up to this assignment). Then jam two nuts together and push on a vinyl tube as shown below. I would also suggest using an o-ring on the engine side of the bolt so you aren't tempted to overtighten it getting it to seal and potentially stripping the threads in the head.

100_5517.JPG
 

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Very nice work, and generous, as you don't feel the need for your own purposes. If this were Twitter, you would have millions of followers! As it is just our little forum, I suspect you only have a couple hundred thousand followers!!!! lol
 

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That's interesting Brian after seeing your experiment I'm concerned. Have owned my TW now for over a year and have changed the oil four times. I was recently reading the shop manual and noticed the bleed screw. With that said of course I have never bleed the oil in the head after changing the oil. My question is, does it matter and doesn't the oil drain out of the head every time the motor is shut off? How many miles would a person expect to get out of a set of rings on a well maintained TW?
 

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I have always been under the impression that the bleeder bolts purpose is to allow us to bleed any air that could get in the oil channels out. Just like a hydraulic brake system, air in the lines could cause a blockage. For me the process of cracking the bleeder bolt and seeing oil flowing gives me peace of mind that all is working as designed.

Initial start up is probably the most damaging moments to our engines health. All the oil that lubricates the head does drain back down when we turn the engine off. Upon start up and depending upon the outside temperature and the viscosity of your oil it could take a while to get the needed oil flowing to your head. I have to wonder if something like that primer bulb if it could be designed to manually pump a shot of oil to the head just before we fire the engine up could possibly help our engines to go longer? Many years ago when we all had 2 cycle dirt bikes an old mechanic told me a good practice after storing the bike for the winter was to remove the plug a give the cylinder a shot of Marvel Mystery Oil on the top of the piston and work the piston up and down a few times before firing up the sitting engine. I followed his advice and must admit I was never sure if it did any good but was always sure it did no harm other than fouling the plug in the beginning. I think the piston and rings sliding against a dry cylinder wall that might have a glaze of light rust would be detrimental.

GaryL
 

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GaryL you are totally right about initial start being the most damaging time for a motor! many years ago I saw ads for external electric oil pumps you could install to give oil flow before start up. sounded like a great idea, but I never did see one. I think that using synthetic oil is very helpful to a cold engine as it flows a lot faster than normal oil
 

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Did an oil change on my tw about 1800 kms ago. Floated the valves doing 120 kph about 15 minutes after I was done. Been great since!
 

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Why would squirting a detergent under spark plug be beneficial?
I could see how a squirt of a lubricant like Marvel Mystery Oil prior to storage could help maintain a oily film during subsequent start up, but do not understand the Sea Foam idea.
 

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Thinking about this kept me up last night so I thought I'd give it a try today.

For those of you who feel compelled to check for oil flow to your head after an oil and filter change (I am not one of those), here is something that would provide a positive visual indicator of oil flow.

I drilled a hole through a socket head bolt and found a piece of vinyl tubing that kind of fit into the socket.

View attachment 22303

View attachment 22304

Here is it installed on the engine.

View attachment 22305

Here is the proof of oil flow. This oil drains back down when you shut the engine off.

View attachment 22306

While this first generation prototype was successful to prove out this concept, it is less than ideal. If you want to try this out and have a more practical and functional gauge, here is what I suggest. Cut the head off of a longer bolt and drill a smaller hole through it than I did above. (Unfortunately my wobbly drill press is not up to this assignment). Then jam two nuts together and push on a vinyl tube as shown below. I would also suggest using an o-ring on the engine side of the bolt so you aren't tempted to overtighten it getting it to seal and potentially stripping the threads in the head.

View attachment 22307
I like your solution. Posting mine here in addition to a couple other spots in case people run across these older threads.

The No Mess Oil Galley Bolt Method of Checking Oil Flow.

Note: The oil moves into the tube slow as the TW's Oil Pump is low pressure so don't worry about oil squirting out the end of the tube. You'll have plenty of time to kill the engine. Also make sure you push the splice somewhat snug into the oil galley hole so it stays or you can hold it with one hand and operate the starter/kill switch buttons with the other.

I finally took a picture of the clear tube to see the oil flow from the oil galley bolt after changing the oil. I use a small drip irrigation splice and put a section of clear plastic tube at the end. I then remove the oil galley bolt, push the plastic splice in the oil galley hole, start the engine and watch for the oil to appear in the plastic tubing. As soon as I see the oil I hit the kill switch. I remove the tube once the oil has drained back into the head then re-install the oil galley bolt.



The splice I use.
 

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I must have taken the idea of checking for oil-flow from that bolt all wrong.:eek: I thought all you had to do was crack the bolt and wait for a little oil to 'weep' from around the threads on startup after the oil change. A quick wipe with a shop rag or paper towel after tightening took care of the couple of drops of oil that formed around the threads......am I doing it wrong?
 

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I must have taken the idea of checking for oil-flow from that bolt all wrong.:eek: I thought all you had to do was crack the bolt and wait for a little oil to 'weep' from around the threads on startup after the oil change. A quick wipe with a shop rag or paper towel after tightening took care of the couple of drops of oil that formed around the threads......am I doing it wrong?
No, you are doing it correctly if you are eventually seeing oil seep around the bolt. I use to wait and wait and still not see any oil seep around the oil galley bolt so I would remove the bolt and put my finger over the hole and... you can see where I'm going here. Messy for sure. So I came up with the clear tube idea out of the clear blue sky. With the clear tube it still took the oil several seconds before appearing in the tube yesterday. Guess I don't have the patience.
 

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Wolfy is following the recommended procedure just fine. TW-Brian and Admiral have just improved upon the concept with a more mess free approach. Personally I would be curious as to just how high the oil would flow in the tubing as the "head" developed is indicative of the oil pressure generated. The pressure generated by the seemingly weak TW oil pump determines the flow rate through any added oil cooler. I always feared the pressure was fairly low and thus the liters per minute through the cooler might be low too. Anyone ever measure the flow rate delivered throughout any cooler at moderate R.P.M.s?
 

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Fred, I don't know the flow rate oil cooler answer, but I can tell you the oil comes through the clear tube pretty slow and one doesn't need to worry about getting the engine shut off in time with the length of tubing I had. The oil only moved up in the tubing around 2".
 

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Since the oil coolers obviously work the pressure generated by the pump must ramp up appreciably as engine speed increases. Certainly oil pressure seems minuscule at idle speeds in my occasionally humble opinion. ( IMOHO?:))

I guess I have always been impressed with Mr.Gizmo's old copper tubing oil cooler since I believe it gravity drains to lower sump. Thus gravity is Gerry's friend helping increased oil flow rates at idle speeds during warm-up...no low pressure up-hill return line for cooled oil back to the filter housing and the on to the cam and valve gallery.
 

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So Tony, I assume the LZRDBRTH oil cooler pick-up happen "upstream" from the the cam? If so I see how diverting some of the oil flow, or reducing some of the pressure in the oil passages could result in a degree of reduced flow, or oil starvation to the cam.
 

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I agree, it probably does reduce the flow of oil to the camshaft but if it were a problem, with all the people that have oil coolers, the problem would've shown up by now.

As an aside, I have questioned the need for an oil cooler. Lots of people don't have them and I haven't heard of any problems the people that don't have oil coolers have had that the people with oil coolers haven't.
 

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If I lived in sunny southern Kaifornia or Arid-Zona and rode in sustained high temps I would get an oil cooler. As is here when I think motor is getting hot usually I am usually also getting hot and thus take a break. I deal with the possible accelerated thermal breakdown of the oil by frequently changing oil for fresh full synthetic....10W-30W over the winter and 20W-50 for the warmer months.
 
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