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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a 2009 TW for my wife and she is very happy with it, other than the suspension. She weighs about 180 and the the suspension bottoms out. This occurs even on casual trails and washboard are way too ruough compared to other bikes we have. Since she likes the bike so much though, I would like to try and do any upgrades I can to make for a better ride. I see that ProCycle has a kit with cartridge emulators, springs, seals and oil for $289 and rear springs for $139. I am willing to spend the money to keep her happy but was wondering if I should go up to a 60kg/15kg set up or heavier? Also, has anyone tried this setup and how happy have you been with it? Thanks
 

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I passed on the emulators but did install their fork and shock springs along with increasing the fork oil level. I weight in at 210 and found for me the softer springs were enough.
 

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First thing to do is get the fork oil to the correct level. They are ALL off by 20-25 mm. You want about 130 mm for her weight. See the technical write-ups for more info, but you can ignore 95% of that for the first try.
Put the bike up on a box and let the front wheel extend all the way. Remove the top caps and the springs and spacers. Let them drain a bit into the forks so you can get a reasonable idea of what is in there....it will probably be around 155 mm when you: Fully compress the forks and use another box or straps to keep them FULLY compressed. Use a 1/8 inch wooden dowel and bright flashlight to determine the oil level from the top of the fork. Add 15 weight fork oil to bring it up to 130 mm.

Let forks all the way down and re-assemble. Take a few rides and see if that is sufficient for her needs. At 200 lbs. that was all I needed to do on the 2010. Now for the 2018 I did that plus install emulators, which are great for washboard, but I did not feel any need for stiffer springs....I just cut down the spacers the exact thickness of the emulators. 2,500 miles later I still think it's perfect.
 

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Hey, Mike...welcome aboard!

I have the same setup as recommended.
Fork Solutions Kit W/.60 Kg/mm springs.
Shock Springs 15Kg/mm
I weigh 192 and that combination is just right. 180lbs. is well within the same ballpark.
The new seals & fork oil will be a good "tune up" as well.

Better suspension (race quality) is certainly available for (a lot) more money, but this "bang for the buck" setup from a great company will do a fine job!

Unless you are an experienced bike mechanic with the proper tools, you might consider finding a dirt-bike specialty shop and have them do the install. Race Tech also has great Tech Support, should your guy need it.
A specialty shop can also handle "fine tuning" of oil level, ride height, etc.

Now, if you *really* want to keep Wifey's Tushy happy, take a look at the Seat Concepts Foam & Cover Kit. Many of us use & recommend them. They are a pretty easy home-install.

As always, post any questions here!

After your bank account recovers, c'mon back and we'll "help" some more!

Do you have a bike, too? Great choice on the TW.

So...what makes you think Arizona is the Heart of Route 66?
I'm on Route 66 in Texas and I was pretty sure we were!?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the responses. I will try and answer all the points made.
From the bottom up, Kingman is in the center of a 160 mile stretch of intact Rt 66 highway, hense the name, heart of 66. I have also heard that this stretch of 66 is the longest stretch that is still in tact though I am not sure if that is true or not.
Though Mo has four bikes, I have but three, a Super Tenere, KLR 650 and KLX 400 and she has the TW, XT 250, Honda CB 500X and a Vespa. Lots of bikes and little money left.
I am looking at the Seat Concepts as well but I may need to trim it down as she does not want a seat that is any wider than what she has now but I agree that the stock seat is not the best.
She does not need hot rod supspension but she does need something that is not going to beat her up when she rides. Thanks for all the suggestions and now I shall start getting the upgrades done. My goal is to have it ready for the White Rim Trail by this fall.
Mikey
 

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You can get a lot more out of the suspension standing with knees slightly bent adding to the short travel of the suspension and getting some squats in while you're at it. Even with stiffer springs it will improve your control and riding ability as well as your health. Cured my sciatica.

I weigh a bit less but ride hard and this has gotten me by for a while yet I too am raising and upgrading my suspension starting with tt225 forks and a R6 mono shock. If the ride height is good for her then some oil and stiffer springs should do fine. Consider the fork oil and riding stance first because the riding weight of heavier springs suggest a slightly heavier weight rider.
 

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I have the 15 gmm spring on the rear and just installed the HyperPro fork spring kit on the front. I've only put 25 miles on the current setup, but I'm very pleased initially. I went with the kit recommendations of 150mm fork oil measurement (15 wt, came with the kit) and stock spacers. Perhaps the best possible compliment is that I just don't notice the suspension shortfalls. Braking is good, rough terrain is good, and in my wet hay field, the rear let go on a bumpy corner while the front stayed planted, although replacing the deathwing with an SR241 contributed to that result. On a notoriously harsh section that always experiences a bottom-out event, nothing happened aside from calmly tracking thru.

My ride weight is around 170 soaking wet in full PPE and an overfilled CamelBak, so others results will vary.

JP
 

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Adding oil to the forks will not help with bottoming out.Obviously you have no idea what the oil's purpose is in a fork.
Obviously I have a really good idea of what oil's purpose is in a TW fork since I learned it from Lzrdbrth. TEN YEARS AGO! Have you read his advice on how to set up a TW fork in the tech write-ups?


EDIT Uh Oh, when will I ever learn? I got bitten by a troll. :mad:
 

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Adding oil to the forks will not help with bottoming out.
Makes a huge difference! I did some experiments a couple of years ago on my Apollo. I used different weight oils and different amounts of oil. I can say with full confidence that the amount of oil will change the force it takes to bottom out. The weight of the oil will change the characteristics too.
 

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Add oil until its 10MM from the top with the forks fully extended. Your springs won't rust and you will NOT bottom out. Well until you hit a big bump and blow the fork seals through the bottom triple clamp.:eek:
 

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That's not very nice....some newbie will take you at your word and blow the seals....before they realize you are kidding....unless they figure out that the forks are as stiff as solid steel beforehand.
 

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Joking aside, Rocky is quite correct — not everyone reading this thread will understand the tongue in cheek humour that we share on here. There are several good threads on here regarding fork oil level, (and not all of them involve Hamsters)

I think the important bits are to get rid of the old stuff first, and then start from scratch. We are not all the same weight, nor ride the in the same conditions — it becomes “personal preference”

Yamaha (in their wit and wisdom) factored in the fat tires on this thing when they were thinking about suspension, and as such, tire pressures have their place to play in the equation. Nor did they expect “some of us” to take the TW where many bikes fear to tread — and especially at the speed that many serious players can go at. If it is remotely possible, we will always push the boundaries

However you look at it, the TW is set up for the “soft option” out of the crate, and the values in the manual support that — take them as a “starting point” only. Pro-cycle (love ‘em or not) have a range of products for the front end bouncy bits that have evolved from experimentation on “The Bee”, from different springs, to emulators — if you want the full story (without the pictures alas) — you’ll find it here - https://www.tw200forum.com/forum/performance-customization/5418-mrbracket-s-tw200-build.html

Having “Bounced the Bee” in Moab earlier this year, I can honestly say it’s an “improvement” — but it’s not a definitive “cure”. You can stop a TW from bottoming out, but your shoulder muscles are still going to take a beating. Once you get it to do what you want it to do, (eg not bottoming out) the rest is in “rider fitness”

So, it becomes a three-fold affair — the correct set-up — the rider fitness — and the acceptance of the limitations of the machine (or the rider) in question

I had the perfect set-up, I was on the Bee in Moab after all - I had the skills, and the “hold my beer, I got this” attitude — but still had the crap knocked out of me simply because I didn’t do this kind of stuff on a weekly (if not daily) basis

It’s not always just about the bike, no matter how well set-up the thing is — so spend some time thinking about that

Pro-cycle can offer a range of products to seriously improve the bouncy bits, and this board can offer a wealth of advice - but the rest is up to you …..
 

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I am surprised that with so much experience on here that no one has noticed how good the suspension is compared to old bikes. Especially after so many have owned the old 2 stroke dirt bikes. A friend of mine had an old 2 stroke 125 Yamaha but I don't know which one. It had the 2 shocks in the back. We swapped bikes and even after a 4" drop my teeth jarred out on his bike. On the TW you couldn't even feel the drop. The power was great though. I was going up a hill, it hit the power band, the bike shot up in the air while I was holding the handlebars, it spun around down the hill, I hit the front brake and stopped it. A TW 125 2 stroke would be a killer if it were EPA friendly. Compared to those old bikes the TW suspension is excellent.
 

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I am surprised that with so much experience on here that no one has noticed how good the suspension is compared to old bikes. Especially after so many have owned the old 2 stroke dirt bikes. A friend of mine had an old 2 stroke 125 Yamaha but I don't know which one. It had the 2 shocks in the back. We swapped bikes and even after a 4" drop my teeth jarred out on his bike. On the TW you couldn't even feel the drop. The power was great though. I was going up a hill, it hit the power band, the bike shot up in the air while I was holding the handlebars, it spun around down the hill, I hit the front brake and stopped it. A TW 125 2 stroke would be a killer if it were EPA friendly. Compared to those old bikes the TW suspension is excellent.
You are correct! Compared to my old DT 250 the suspension and brakes on the TW 200 are great! But, I only weigh 155 lbs, so I can see how heavier riders would need to upgrade. Getting the fork oil right is an inexpensive and critical first step.
 

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Oh, the funny stuff is appreciated. What is not is seemingly insulting comments like "Obviously you have no idea what the oil's purpose is in a fork".
Now LittleTommy edited that sentence out from a new person's post #8. I think Tommy should have left it to the newbie to decide if he/she still thought that was an appropriate comment.
We try to be fairly helpful here so cautionary clues to fellow member's attitudes can be helpful.
 
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