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Discussion Starter #1
Purple’s fork oil (hamster) thread got me thinking about my suspension. Do any of you folks who ride a mostly street setup have advice for softening up the ride on potholed streets? Oil type, weight, volume, springs, etc? Lowering the tire pressure has helped. This winter, I gotta get what I assume is the original fork oil out, so if there’s something I can or should do that will be the time to do it. I’m 175 and currently on BW203 and 204. Bike is a 2001 with 5,500 miles, tires probably 1,500.

Took my first cold weather ride yesterday. Everything on the suspension seemed stiffer times ten. Is that to be expected?

I know if I really want a soft ride, I really need a different bike. But if I sold this one, I’d just end up buying another TW, so I guess I need to get it as good as I can and accept the ride as it is. Cheers
 

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If you are 175, you are a lot older than me. And still riding! My advice is dodge the potholes, it is a sort of game you play with the people responsible for them.
They try to shorten your life and the life of your bike and you try to frustrate them, and have fun doing it.

I see you have a photo of two Walmart shoppers for an avatar.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you are 175, you are a lot older than me. And still riding! My advice is dodge the potholes, it is a sort of game you play with the people responsible for them.
They try to shorten your life and the life of your bike and you try to frustrate them, and have fun doing it.

I see you have a photo of two Walmart shoppers for an avatar.
LOL - They are my sisters, and they’re available. Phelonius - is your VanVan any softer on bumpy roads? Pretty sure the seat would be good for my roids. Cheers
 

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Do any of you folks who ride a mostly street setup have advice for softening up the ride on potholed streets?

Wheelie the front over - then stoppie slow roll till the back is over. --- Or if you have real skills; stoppie with the back end swinging around past the hole, then lift the front swinging it back in front and continue on to the next hole etc. Oh; and send us video!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
"LOL - They are my sisters, and they’re available. Phelonius - is your VanVan any softer on bumpy roads? Pretty sure the seat would be good for my roids. Cheers"


At first I thought you spelled "roads" wrong lol
And I was only partly joking what with being old and all.
 

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Lol, I’ll pass on your sisters but yes the oil will be thicker in the cold, if you plan to ride a lot in the cold your best bet would be to change to a lighter oil in the winter. As for the rest not much I can recommend other than dodge what you can and stand up (at least a little) for the others. Your legs are better shock absorbers than you can make the TWs unless the budget is unlimited.

Others on here have done almost everything imaginable to get better forks from different forks from other bikes to emulators and such, maybe they have some good options.

Question, how big of a turkey or turkeys do you need for them there girls come Thanksgiving?
 

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Purple’s fork oil (hamster) thread got me thinking about my suspension. Do any of you folks who ride a mostly street setup have advice for softening up the ride on potholed streets? Oil type, weight, volume, springs, etc? Lowering the tire pressure has helped. This winter, I gotta get what I assume is the original fork oil out, so if there’s something I can or should do that will be the time to do it. I’m 175 and currently on BW203 and 204. Bike is a 2001 with 5,500 miles, tires probably 1,500.

Took my first cold weather ride yesterday. Everything on the suspension seemed stiffer times ten. Is that to be expected?

I know if I really want a soft ride, I really need a different bike. But if I sold this one, I’d just end up buying another TW, so I guess I need to get it as good as I can and accept the ride as it is. Cheers
Unfortunately, this poor ride is the result of the cheap damping rod fork on the TW. The harshness felt when hitting a pothole is a direct affect. When hitting these, the fork must quickly compress and absorb the hit. However, when the fluid tries to move quickly through the small holes in the damping rod, it can't move through fast enough, thus causing this harsh, stiff feeling. The remedy is to install the Race Tech Gold Cartridge Emulators. This can be a scary chore if you aren't handy or don't know what you are doing, but the results are amazing, and adjustable. If you have the patience, you can dramatically improve the ride.

The product installation requires drilling out the holes in the damping rods. Therefore, the compression dampening will no longer be controlled by the rods themselves, but by the cartridge emulator, which sits on top of the rods. It has a shim stack which is what will now allow the fluid to pass. How much and how fast is adjusted by a spring and a screw. Turn the screw by different amounts to get a differing result. The spring can be swapped out too for even a larger range of adjustment. Most here have found great results out of the box by just dropping them in. I love the ability to fine tune for those wanting to experiment and take the time and effort.

The emulators can be found on Amazon for the best price here... http://amzn.to/2iGcmfU
If you are over 200lb., you might also consider a stiffer spring option and purchase a whole fork kit from Procycle here... https://procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html

There are many threads on this, and many here willing to help here online. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Unfortunately, this poor ride is the result of the cheap damping rod fork on the TW. The harshness felt when hitting a pothole is a direct affect. When hitting these, the fork must quickly compress and absorb the hit. However, when the fluid tries to move quickly through the small holes in the damping rod, it can't move through fast enough, thus causing this harsh, stiff feeling. The remedy is to install the Race Tech Gold Cartridge Emulators. This can be a scary chore if you aren't handy or don't know what you are doing, but the results are amazing, and adjustable. If you have the patience, you can dramatically improve the ride.

The product installation requires drilling out the holes in the damping rods. Therefore, the compression dampening will no longer be controlled by the rods themselves, but by the cartridge emulator, which sits on top of the rods. It has a shim stack which is what will now allow the fluid to pass. How much and how fast is adjusted by a spring and a screw. Turn the screw by different amounts to get a differing result. The spring can be swapped out too for even a larger range of adjustment. Most here have found great results out of the box by just dropping them in. I love the ability to fine tune for those wanting to experiment and take the time and effort.

The emulators can be found on Amazon for the best price here... http://amzn.to/2iGcmfU
If you are over 200lb., you might also consider a stiffer spring option and purchase a whole fork kit from Procycle here... https://procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html

There are many threads on this, and many here willing to help here online. Good luck.
Thanks Larry. This is helpful. Thanks for the videos. Only recently realized that was you on YouTube.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Here’s the skinny on my avatar...

Heaviest twins (male) | Guinness World Records

I read a story that these dudes road cross country on those bikes and were sponsored by Honda and Holiday Inn. The picture always reminds me that everything is better on a motorcycle.
 

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I went the full $400+ for the fork solution kit with heavy springs, and heavy rear spring from ProCycle. I think it's excessive for what you get, but made a world of difference on those pot holes you mention. At 175 your still a mear whippersnapper to my 250, but keep working at it and you'll get there. Be aware though. nether the rear spring or fork solution kit are quite "plug N play". The rear spring requires the shock to be removed and the spring to be pressed off. Your not going to just squeeze it down. The fork solution kit, or even just the emulators, requires damping rod removal to drill out the metering holes, so there's no going back, without replacing damping rods. My emulators came stock with the 3rd heaviest of 4 damping springs installed, and I installed them as they came. If I was more concerned about pot holes rather than trail riding I might try the next spring down or the preload backed off some. They are very adjustable.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Thanks Pete. That helps. My budget means I will have to go piece by piece. I’m thinking of doing the emulators first. Seems to me they provide the biggest improvement. Especially because they’re adjustable. Would you agree?

I would have never thought of attempting any of this before I joined this forum. I watched the emulator installation videos and I’m ready to do it. Cheers
 

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Thanks Pete. That helps. My budget means I will have to go piece by piece. I’m thinking of doing the emulators first. Seems to me they provide the biggest improvement. Especially because they’re adjustable. Would you agree?

I would have never thought of attempting any of this before I joined this forum. I watched the emulator installation videos and I’m ready to do it. Cheers

I can't help it. I've used this in a couple of my video's. Read this thread and I thought it would compliment the topic, of course without any meaningful help. :p

https://www.zedge.net/ringtone/992918/
 

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I might go for stiffer springs but use less oil and a lighter viscosity. This way the springs keep the front end up at maximum travel to not bottom out but has less progression and lighter damping to not be harsh on sharp road pot holes. If you just go soft the rod will be mush and compress when braking
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks Maxpower. I hadn’t thought of that. I definitely don’t want a ton of brake dive. The potholes tend to congregate in corners here. I see that as my biggest danger here in the city, other than being seen. In fact, that has been my only slight pucker moment on the TW - potholes on corners under braking. Until I get the suspension addressed, I’m just trying to do most of my braking before the corner. And I ride pretty slow anyway. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #20
How long does it take you guys to change the spring on each fork - ballpark? I realize the first time takes much longer.

Also, am I correct in assuming the forks do not have to come off the bike for emulator adjustment? Cheers
 
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