TW200 Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Back story: I purchased a New LED tail light with integrated turn signals of ebay. I already had the LED tail light from PROCYCLE. I bought the ebay LED because I also just recently bought a pair of LED Tuff Lite turn signals and didnt realize it was only one pair (blonde moment). Instead of paying another 50 bucks for another pair, I spent 15 bucks on ebay the LED tail light. I installed the unit on my bike already, I just haven't wired it up yet.

Problem: The tail light has 5 wires, the three for the tail light (positive, negative ground??), a left positive and a right positive. Will the turn signals work without a negative of their own or does the one negative on the unit suffice??( I'm super new to this whole wiring thing.) If so, do I just tape off the negatives from the old turn signals?


Thanks guys,
-Mikey-

taillight.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Tail light: three wires, one ground, one tail light [running light], one brake light.
Turn signals: one wire each.

Yes, they share the ground wire.

Do you have an electronic flasher?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you. Yeah I have a new flasher for it, and the diode kit. but i think im going to just throw an LED in the dash instead of using the kit. As for the flasher, I'm going to wing it. I don't really know what I'm doing, but thats half the fun isn't it? haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Is there a wiring diagram? If so, hook up the negative [aka the ground wire], and then one at a time put [touch the wire to 12v] each wire to power. See what it does.

On the bike, the turn signals are going to have two different color wires each. On each side, there ought to be one wire that is the same color as the other side. This will be the negative wire. You can just tape those off. Hook up the turn signal wire on the new light to the untaped turn signal wire.

For the tail and brake lights, you can touch one of the wires to the bike tail / brake wires with the key on. The one that lights the LED is the tail light. The other one won't light it up until the brake is applied. [Stating the obvious, forgive me if you know this] Ensure you get a bright light when the brake is applied when you have it wired.

.... Seal it with heat shrink and tape, AFTER all that. Maybe even some liquid electrical tape on top.

Have fun.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Fred

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Fred

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #6

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,142 Posts
Always good folks here like Brian to help other members, ya gotta love this forum!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Hey all,

So, doing some research to improve the odds that trailing cagers will not add me and the TW as a hood ornament...

Came across an interesting, economical option:

Motorcycle LED Rear Brake License Plate Turn Signal Integrated Tail Light US | eBay

These are the new SMD LED's, apparently, which are much brighter than standard. Check out the video - for around $30, I think I'm sold. Pretty cheap insurance, IMHO.

My only question: if any of you have added this, or a comparable LED tail light strip, what did you use in the way of controller module, etc? My understanding is this is not a splice it in & you're good to go situation, due to LED load/resistance issues (can cause the "quick blink" effect), if you just splice into OEM wiring... I also liked the look of the turn-signal sequential blink from inner to outer on this setup, too - nice effect. (See video)

I'm also interested in any recommendations on a super-bright LED replacement bulb for the stock tail/brake light housing, to increase visibility. Also, need to know if resistors, etc., would be needed for this type of modification.

Any help?

TIA

PS: Btw, I am not, nor do I have any affiliation with this Ebay seller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Make sure your lights are D.O.T. approved.

I have not installed one. I have only have one caution. Check your State's laws about them. Here in MN, the overly restrictive laws forbid modulated brake lights. I've seen youtube videos from California, and any light modifications from stock are illegal.

I think modulated brake lights on a motorcycle should be allowed nationally, and a federal requirement. I have seen them in action, and they really do draw attention.

Since I have no experience wiring the modulators, I'll let others chime in.

A word of caution: The traditional way that turn signals work, have an added benefit to us. If one turnsignal starts flashing more quickly than it did, it tells us at least one of our turn signal bulbs has burned out. With LED's, we don't have that. So be sure to test all your lights before every ride. I may know what I'm doing, but why not ensure others around us know what we're planning too. I'm a big advocate of testing ALL the lights on every vehicle I drive operate -- my car, once a week -- my bikes, Every Ride. My favorite for testing car brake lights, if no one else is around to help, is to back in to a spot by a store with a glass front and look at the reflection. I used to be a school bus driver. Checking every light, every day is part of the routine.


There are two ways you can use LED turnsignals on our bikes.
1) Leave the flasher alone.
-Requires the use of resistors to increase the "LOAD" so the flasher thinks ;) there is a functioning traditional bulb. The resistor is installed in parallel to the LED. And only on the Turn Signal wire and ground, or negative wire.

2) Replace the flasher with an electronic [not controlled by current] one. Use the LED's without resistors.

Both of these require a pair of diodes, one each for left & right turn signals at the dash for the turn signal indicator. Our indictor has 3 wires: ground, left turn & right turn. The diodes are installed in-line [in series] with the left & right wires. The diodes are polarity sensitive, and will only work installed the right way. The end with the radial band on it is the negative end. When you cut the wire at the signal indicator, turn on that turn signal, and use a meter to find out which end is negative and which is positive.

You likely know this, but if this is your first trip into DC voltage, bear with me. The black lead of a meter is negative. The red is positive. When you cut a wire, and connect the leads, if you get a postive voltage reading, the red lead is touching the positive side. The black lead is is the negative side.

The band of the diode connects to the lead that black lead is touching. If you get a negative voltage, reverse the leads. You'll see positive voltage.

For any light that does not have a flasher, if it is designed for motor vehical use, you will not need a resistor. So your tail/brake light can be just installed. It will work fine.

Again, use lights that are D.O.T. Approved!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Hey Brian,

Thanks for the write up. I'm leaning toward using the OEM flasher with diodes & resistors to avoid the expense & exercise of the modulator. I will have to figure out what I need specifically, as far as these parts are concerned. Thanks for the valuable input!

-K-

Make sure your lights are D.O.T. approved.

I have not installed one. I have only have one caution. Check your State's laws about them. Here in MN, the overly restrictive laws forbid modulated brake lights. I've seen youtube videos from California, and any light modifications from stock are illegal.

I think modulated brake lights on a motorcycle should be allowed nationally, and a federal requirement. I have seen them in action, and they really do draw attention.

Since I have no experience wiring the modulators, I'll let others chime in.

A word of caution: The traditional way that turn signals work, have an added benefit to us. If one turnsignal starts flashing more quickly than it did, it tells us at least one of our turn signal bulbs has burned out. With LED's, we don't have that. So be sure to test all your lights before every ride. I may know what I'm doing, but why not ensure others around us know what we're planning too. I'm a big advocate of testing ALL the lights on every vehicle I drive operate -- my car, once a week -- my bikes, Every Ride. My favorite for testing car brake lights, if no one else is around to help, is to back in to a spot by a store with a glass front and look at the reflection. I used to be a school bus driver. Checking every light, every day is part of the routine.


There are two ways you can use LED turnsignals on our bikes.
1) Leave the flasher alone.
-Requires the use of resistors to increase the "LOAD" so the flasher thinks ;) there is a functioning traditional bulb. The resistor is installed in parallel to the LED. And only on the Turn Signal wire and ground, or negative wire.

2) Replace the flasher with an electronic [not controlled by current] one. Use the LED's without resistors.

Both of these require a pair of diodes, one each for left & right turn signals at the dash for the turn signal indicator. Our indictor has 3 wires: ground, left turn & right turn. The diodes are installed in-line [in series] with the left & right wires. The diodes are polarity sensitive, and will only work installed the right way. The end with the radial band on it is the negative end. When you cut the wire at the signal indicator, turn on that turn signal, and use a meter to find out which end is negative and which is positive.

You likely know this, but if this is your first trip into DC voltage, bear with me. The black lead of a meter is negative. The red is positive. When you cut a wire, and connect the leads, if you get a postive voltage reading, the red lead is touching the positive side. The black lead is is the negative side.

The band of the diode connects to the lead that black lead is touching. If you get a negative voltage, reverse the leads. You'll see positive voltage.

For any light that does not have a flasher, if it is designed for motor vehical use, you will not need a resistor. So your tail/brake light can be just installed. It will work fine.

Again, use lights that are D.O.T. Approved!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
SeaDub200,

I actually would go with the LED, or electronic flasher, and the diodes for the turn signal indicator.

I don't know the exact part to get, but if you take your turn signal flasher to an auto parts store, you can find an electronic flasher with the right terminals for a relatively low cost. By doing this, you don't have to tap into any wires by the turn signals. Wires don't like wet. I say skip the resistors -- that's my humble opinion. Adding resistors is just fine, too.

This does not require a modulator -- the modulator is a separate item. You can skip it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: howardgene63

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
This site should have everything you need Tail Lights
Plus they are American, so any question you may have about DOT or connections or blinker modules, they can answer.


http://shop.12oclocklabs.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=38&product_id=69

Known Plug & Play Compatibility List...
Though your motorcycle may not be in the list, if your flasher relay plug resembles the plug above, it will be compatible, contact us for advisement if unsure.
Yamaha WR250X/R (2008-2014), Yamaha TW200 (2001-2010)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Thank you. Yeah I have a new flasher for it, and the diode kit. but i think im going to just throw an LED in the dash instead of using the kit. As for the flasher, I'm going to wing it. I don't really know what I'm doing, but thats half the fun isn't it? haha
Just wondering how this turned out. Do you have any pics ? Bought the same light. Thanks!!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top