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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Teachable Moment

This dramatic dashcam footage of a motorcycle/semi collision in Winnipeg should be mandatory viewing in every motorcycle safety course. It highlights a too-common hazard at intersections. Check out the middle and bottom video links on the right first, and then the top one which includes the motorcyclist's comments on what happened.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/shocking-video-shows-semi-truck-colliding-with-motorcycle-in-manitoba-1.3910536

This could generate an interesting discussion.
 

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Motorcyclist did a rather poor job of braking and should really have shown better situational awareness of oncoming truck's lack of deceleration.
 

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Clearly the truck was in the wrong but I mostly agree with what Fred's pointing out in regards to situational awareness. Without getting to preachy, it's possible the motorcyclist could have avoided getting hit by looking both ways before proceeding.

Good post Elvesus and it's always a good reminder for us to see posts like this and the accompanying video. Thanks

(now, if they could only come up with a law to keep those pesky deer, moose and elk from running out in front of us. "The Rut" or cell phone usage I'm guessing :D. It's just wrong for deer and what not to be on the phone while running across a road. Just wrong!).:p
 

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Don't we all look left, then right, then left, then right, then left, then right one more time before we pull into an intersection? I can't believe he didn't see it.
 

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seems to be a regular thing for truckers to run red lights in Manitoba. the trucker is at fault, so why did he only get a $406 fine? there were a few clues the biker could have picked up on and like others have said to look both ways a few times before letting out the clutch. another observation he should have made, and this is one that has saved me a few times, is the cars across from him weren't moving. the semi saw the other truck coming and he never moved at all
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I agree with everyone on the critical importance of looking both ways before entering the intersection. Having the technical right of way doesn't mean much if you get squashed.
 

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Truckers operate with ‘The right of weight’ rule. It not on the legal books, but it’s best to keep it in mind. It’s no fun being in the ‘right’, but dead.
 

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I guess it may not be that often that people practice maximum effort panic stops, especially on a big shiny bike where a tip over while learning can be both heavy and expensive.
Perhaps there is a teaching moment here about practicing panic stops on a variety of surfaces.
For example anytime it is wet it is often just a guess for me as to how close to the edge I am.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I guess it may not be that often that people practice maximum effort panic stops, especially on a big shiny bike where a tip over while learning can be both heavy and expensive.
Perhaps there is a teaching moment here about practicing panic stops on a variety of surfaces.
For example anytime it is wet it is often just a guess for me as to how close to the edge I am.
Good reminder Fred. I haven't done any practice emergency stops yet this season.
 
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Man that guy was lucky. When I approach an intersection I check to see if anyone is behind me and if there is I flash my brake light to get their attention. Even for a green light I always slow down and drop a gear or two and am ready to brake or accelerate and if I can't see much of the intersection as I approach I really slow down. I love speed and pushing my personal limitations on and off-road but traffic requires high alert and caution.
 

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I tried a few panic stops on asphalt after reading this thread. It was a case of I better "practice what you preach".
The TW and I did very poorly.
We didn't crash, skid or squid...just didn't come to a stop in nearly a short a distance as I had hoped.
Time to bleed the brake again and hopefully get brave enough to practice more.:eek:
 

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In the Motorcycle Safety Class I had to take many years ago, you were taught in a panic stop to use front brake, rear brake and downshift all at the same time to maximize your stopping power. Do not pull in the clutch during severe braking, you are losing some of the engine effect.
No matter who's at fault there, YOU are responsible for your own safety, more than anyone else on or off the road.
He missed seeing that truck until it pulled out right in front of him and his peripheral vision was nil because he was too focused on what was dead ahead of him. You need to scan side to side always, especially at intersections, and learn how to anticipate road hazards, like the driver who hits you while they make a left turn in front of you in an intersection, saying "I never saw him". Whether you live or die is more up to you than anyone else.
 

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I'm surprised that they taught you not to pull in the clutch under heavy braking, as that will stall the engine and then you won't have any giddy up and go if you need it
 

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My M.S.F. course taught the same way. Down shift as your braking. This keeps the bike in the correct gear if you need to power out. If it's not done you will stall or be in too high a gear to do any good.
 
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