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I have a few electrical questions for the local gurus



Regarding the over-rides and safty switches. What are they and how to bypass them.



I see a pair of wire going into the clutch perch, whats that for?



I have a 1987 if that matters



thankyou in advance
 

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I have a few electrical questions for the local gurus



Regarding the over-rides and safty switches. What are they and how to bypass them.



I see a pair of wire going into the clutch perch, whats that for?



I have a 1987 if that matters



thankyou in advance




I'm no expert, but I'll tell you what I know:



The wire that goes into the clutch perch tells the bike that the clutch is engaged/disengaged. This allows you to start the bike in gear if you pull the clutch lever in.



There is a neutral safety switch on the left side of the bike that I really don't know much about.



There is a switch on the kickstand. This switch will kill the bike if it is in gear and you put the kickstand down.



The kickstand switch is probably the most problematic due to its location. Water and crud can get into the switch and make it stick. Sometimes the bike won't start, or it will die while you are riding. Others have reported that when you travel a bumpy road, the kickstand can vibrate and the kickstand switch will cause the bike to run intermittently.



The kickstand switch is probably the easiest one to bypass. Follow the wire up to where it joins the wire harness. Unplug it, and use a piece of wire to complete the circuit. Or cut off the factory connection and put on some butt connectors to complete the circuit.



I hope this helps some and I hope others with more experience will chime in.
 

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How long would it take to kill the battery or fry the coil if i left the safety switch on? (key off)

I was told by the previos bike owner that it could happen and never to leave the switch on.
 

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Nice story Grandpa



This was true of point/coil ignitions not electronic



There certainly is some "leakage" in the electronics plus lights etc so battery

would go away in a while I'ld guess like 2 to 3 hours
 

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Nice story Grandpa



This was true of point/coil ignitions not electronic



There certainly is some "leakage" in the electronics plus lights etc so battery

would go away in a while I'ld guess like 2 to 3 hours


Ok so no worries on the coil... Or frying anything leaving the safety switch on...

But what if the lights and ignition (key) are both off?



Im just wondering because its the only reason I'd disable that switch
 

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Ok so no worries on the coil... Or frying anything leaving the safety switch on...

But what if the lights and ignition (key) are both off?



Im just wondering because its the only reason I'd disable that switch


I'm struggling to follow what you are asking. The previous owner of your bike has led you astray with regards to a dying battery being caused by safety switches.



*Keeping or removing any of the safety switches won't do you any good as far as battery life goes, electricity is only flowing into the safety switch circuits if the key is ON.



*If the key is ON then your headlights will also be on.



*If you only use the kill switch to turn the bike off but leave the key on ON then walk away, you will eventually have a dead battery. But why would you walk away from a bike long enough with the key still in it and in the ON position?
 

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I'm struggling to follow what you are asking. The previous owner of your bike has led you astray with regards to a dying battery being caused by safety switches.



*Keeping or removing any of the safety switches won't do you any good as far as battery life goes, electricity is only flowing into the safety switch circuits if the key is ON.



*If the key is ON then your headlights will also be on.



*If you only use the kill switch to turn the bike off but leave the key on ON then walk away, you will eventually have a dead battery. But why would you walk away from a bike long enough with the key still in it and in the ON position?


Ok you answered my question...

I had been told that even if the key is off and nothing is therefore on, that leaving the safety switch on the right handle bar in the on position will drain the battery. My concern was that if i forgot to turn the safety off after removing my key, that Id come back to a dead battery.
 

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No not necessarily



I have had bikes where the ignition switch was AFTER the safety circuit



However if it shorted it would pop the fuse



If you don't care just connect them together



The Previous owner must have had a mysterious battery drain.



Charge battery disconect and see if she's fine next time youwant to

start her.



Dirt or corrosion at wire connector plugs can cause current leakage, clean plugs

Possible funky component in r/r etc
 

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Ok you answered my question...

I had been told that even if the key is off and nothing is therefore on, that leaving the safety switch on the right handle bar in the on position will drain the battery. My concern was that if i forgot to turn the safety off after removing my key, that Id come back to a dead battery.


No not necessarily



I have had bikes where the ignition switch was AFTER the safety circuit



However if it shorted it would pop the fuse



If you don't care just connect them together



The Previous owner must have had a mysterious battery drain.



Charge battery disconect and see if she's fine next time youwant to

start her.



Dirt or corrosion at wire connector plugs can cause current leakage, clean plugs

Possible funky component in r/r etc


Okay, the vocabulary being used here is confusing people. The "safety switch" member Turwilliger is referring to is actually the engine stop switch/kill switch. He is not referring to the clutch or sidestand/kickstand safety switches. Look at the wiring diagram for a TW200 (click me), the only time the safety switch circuit is energized is when the key is in the ON position. Other bikes may be different, but then we'd be comparing apples to oranges.



Turwilliger, usually the clutch switch and sidestand switch (as labeled in the linked wiring diagram) are commonly referred to as the safety switches. The engine stop switch/kill switch does not usually fall under the term "safety switch".
 

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Assuming that you have good relay contacts you can disable the safety switches on an '87 without rewiring as follows:



Bypass the sidestand switch as outlined by Rainman. Unbolt switch from frame. Throw it at the neighbor's dog (optional).



Disconnect clutch safety switch from clutch perch. Unplug switch from bullet connectors behind headlight. The switch is nearly weightless, so ziptie a rock to it before aiming for dog.



This is not as good as completely eliminating the relays and redundant wiring, but it gets rid of the problematic switches.



Disclaimer: The above presented for test purposes only. Void where prohibited, taxed or regulated. Switch removal may have short-term side effects including temporary memory loss, head and leg pain. In most cases short-term memory is restored by the second time you (A): hit the button while in gear with the clutch out or B.: attempt a left turn with the kickstand down. Head and leg pain diminish shortly thereafter in most respondents.



YMMV.
 
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