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Well, since I screwed up and posted this in the wrong place and don't know how to fix it...I might as well compound the error. Here is another one I really enjoyed.
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Only a few more pages to go. This is a great book by an Aussie who really had no clue when he started out. He is a talented writer and a skilled storyteller, I enjoyed it very much.

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Just read The Longest Ride by Emilio Scotto. The book is now borrowed , no pic. I was recently in The Riverside Casino in Laughlin Nv. looking at the car collection. There was a small collection of classic motorcycles and amidst these beauties was a pretty beat up Gold Wing with flag decals all over it! It was the bike used by the Author who went around the world on it. I think it had well over 500,000 mi on the odometer! This poor machine had been through the Amazon Jungle, through the Sahara , the Arctic Circle , you name it. So the book was for sale at the gift shop and I bought it and read it ! Pretty interesting story with great pictures. I wonder if the TW will ever be ridden around the world? http://dloadfreebookz.blogspot.com/2014/02/download-free-longest-ride-my-ten-year_19.html
Hope this link works for you!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I put it on my list Pass Man. I too have wondered about the TW as a RTW bike. Here and there on this forum small comments have been made in that regard (might have been by me). One problem would be sourcing a replacement for the unusually sized rear tire in remote locations. There might be other issues too, but they aren't really apparent to me. Personally I think it would be a fine RTW bike.
 

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Well, since I screwed up and posted this in the wrong place and don't know how to fix it...I might as well compound the error. Here is another one I really enjoyed.
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I met him last October at the Horizon Unlimited event in Cambria, CA. Great story teller. An even better story teller and good reading is by Sam Manicom "Into Africa"

 

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Purple I can't find it in anything but audio book...and that won't work well for me being darned near deaf and all. Do you have a link for an ebook or print version? I would like to read it on your recommendation.
 

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Purple I can't find it in anything but audio book...and that won't work well for me being darned near deaf and all. Do you have a link for an ebook or print version? I would like to read it on your recommendation.
Hey Borneo, I downloaded the Kindle version since I travel a lot for work which make it easier than carrying multiple books. Anyhow, here is the link to his website...he has 3 other books available.

Into Africa by Sam Manicom
 

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Thank you Purple, Kindle was what I wanted actually. I can't understand why my general amazon search didn't pop it up. I went back and searched kindle books specifically. Got it now. We get the predicted 6-12 inches of snow I will have time to read it.
 

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I'm not that far into it but I can already tell you that Purple is right. Into Africa by Sam Manicom is an extremely good read.
 

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I'm not that far into it but I can already tell you that Purple is right. Into Africa by Sam Manicom is an extremely good read.
Just imagine him telling the story at night in front of a projector as the back light. His ability to tell a story is what convince me to buy his book.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I do love motorcycles. But ever since I was a wee chap I have been a dedicated fly fisherman and bird hunter. So, this isn't a motorcycle book.

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"Nelson Bryant of West Tisbury was for almost 40 years the outdoor columnist for The New York Times. As a young man, he participated in the D-Day invasion with the 82nd Airborne. Later he became managing editor of the Daily Eagle in Claremont, New Hampshire and then a dock builder on the Vineyard, before beginning a career as a columnist that would take him around the world and back again to the Vineyard."

He writes with a beauty seldom matched.
 

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Nelson Bryant:

"Once upon a time, my daughters, there was a boy who beheld the earth with a wonder much like yours. Each dawn was promise, each season a delight and the world, for all its anguish was good to know.

Those were the years when the boy could spend an entire August afternoon, nibbling watercress and watching trout hover above the pebbles in a brook, a time when the years that lay ahead, seemed inexhaustible, a time of soaring dreams. It was the time when a gull's cry, muted by fog and distance, could call the boy down miles of empty beach alone, his thoughts as wide as the Atlantic.

And it may startle you to know that your father, who was once the boy, still feels the tug of moonlight through pines or across the shining water, and marvels at the first lilies of spring.

The secret I would have you know this Christmas Eve is that even though the years will steal your fresh beauty, it need only be, in truth, a minor theft. What you must guard against is that jaded state wherein there is nothing new to see or learn.

Marvel at the sun, rejoice in the rhythmic wheeling of the stars and learn their names, cry aloud at the swelling beauty of an orchid in the white oak woods, or December's first snow; slide down the wind with a hawk and cherish the smell of woodsmoke and mayflowers, or the caress of a warm wool blanket; tarry by a stream where willows bend and flee tedium's gray embrace.

Cherish laughter and whimsy, but battle unrelentingly for what you know is right and be aware that the thieves of wonder can enter any heart.

This does not mean that you will forever walk in fields of flowers where sweet birds sing, although there, is no father who has not, for a time at least, wished this for his girls.

You will love and be loved, hurt and be hurt and you will know despair and taste regret, but if your father's wish is answered, you will accept all this and ask for more.

Look back, my girls, but not too often and more to learn than to regret, for regret grows fat as hope grows lean.

Less wise than loving, striving to make words replace some deeds undone, your father wishes you a happy Christmas."
 

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Discussion Starter #19
"This purely wonderful autobiographical volume is the best thing on flying and the meaning of flying that we have had since Antoine de Saint-Exupéry took us aloft on his winged prose in the late 1930s and early 1940s. . . . It is a splendid and many-faceted personal memoir that is not only one man's story but the story, in essence, of all men who fly." (Chicago Sunday Tribune)

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