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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In my youth we would look for what we called "Pig Iron"
Great for our sling shots !
Well, Now that I have a TW and have been exploring the local trails and woods I now find that there are areas way worse than the pics I took this morning,
This is outside of Pittsburgh Pa.
Its basically unridable as you can imagine,
Heres its mostly in between the rails, But near by it covers the entire width of the area.
Lots of rails around here have been pulled and while one is still in use, There are many with the area where the second rail was, A nice path to the next town,
Wow,
Watch out!
Lots of fun to navigate thru a 1/4 mile of this stuff .
Look at this !
Peter B
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Riding on those piglets would be like a "hog on ice". :p

I was curious where the saying "pig Iron" came from.

The traditional shape of the molds used for pig iron ingots was a branching structure formed in sand, with many individual ingots at right angles to a central channel or runner, resembling a litter of piglets being suckled by a sow. When the metal had cooled and hardened, the smaller ingots (the pigs) were simply broken from the runner (the sow), hence the name pig iron. As pig iron is intended for remelting, the uneven size of the ingots and the inclusion of small amounts of sand caused only insignificant problems considering the ease of casting and handling them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Riding on those piglets would be like a "hog on ice". :p

I was curious where the saying "pig Iron" came from.

The traditional shape of the molds used for pig iron ingots was a branching structure formed in sand, with many individual ingots at right angles to a central channel or runner, resembling a litter of piglets being suckled by a sow. When the metal had cooled and hardened, the smaller ingots (the pigs) were simply broken from the runner (the sow), hence the name pig iron. As pig iron is intended for remelting, the uneven size of the ingots and the inclusion of small amounts of sand caused only insignificant problems considering the ease of casting and handling them.
Interesting.
They run them in the freighter cars here in Pittsburgh and yes they are squirrely to say the least,
In the Philadelphia suburb I grew up in it would take a half an hour to get a pocket full,
Thanks for the information in them,
 
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