TW200 Forum banner

How mant years before you change the rear tire ?

  • Every five years

    Votes: 10 27.8%
  • Every ten years

    Votes: 10 27.8%
  • Every 15 years (if it's in good shape up till then)

    Votes: 7 19.4%
  • My rear tire is even older than this

    Votes: 9 25.0%

  • Total voters
    36
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,312 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My rear tire is the standard TW34 – you’ve probably got one on there now …..

My ’98 bike is immaculate – (yeah, I know, I should get out more often) – 5k miles on the clock, looks like it’s still wearing the original rear tire (the matching front was pretty worn down when I got it and has been changed out for a K60) – plenty of life on the rear tire

It looks good – it feels good – it performs good – (and as a bonus, it still holds air) ………

But – (there’s always a “but”) – that tire is now 17 years old – (I’ve had girl-friends younger than that)

My personal “instincts” are to run it for another couple of years – it hasn’t gone hard – and I can handle a rear blow out if it all goes pear shaped, (much like my girl-friends in fact)

The above poll is to determine your own feelings on tire age – just on rear tires and specific to the TW (I would never consider a tire of such age on a sports bike)

Some would argue swapping it out at five years – maybe ten – maybe even older

So – are you anal about tires – and if so – in what direction ?

Do you have an older tire than 17 years on your TW ?

Call me crazy on this thread if you wish – I’ve been called worse (trust me) – it’s my arse and I can land on it if I want to – but in the poll, tell me about you ………….
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
779 Posts
Our bikes are rarely left outside. UV is likely the biggest culprit in deterioration (although I have read there is degradation with exposure to the atmosphere, (tires do go bad in storage). If it's not showing dry rot and it's not flat spotted, I would run it. Mine is an 02 original tire and I wont replace it until I see or experience an issue that warrants replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,367 Posts
That's just too old. There could easily be issues you can't spot. Yes, it is your arse, but I for one would prefer you not grind it off on a highway. Besides, tires aren't exactly expensive...at least not for the TW. Around a hundred bucks here.

Furthermore, if you are as old as I am you can have the safety and security of a new tire right now and when it's time for a new one in 17 years you probably won't care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Yeah I'd change that tire. I think the TW31 on my '92 when I got it was ten years old when I got it. Worked fine too, but for a bike that sees highway use, I wasn't willing to trust it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,142 Posts
10 years would be the maximum I would run a bike tire, and that would be a bike that is stored inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,179 Posts
I have two thoughts about old tires. First, let all of the air out of the tire, try folding the side wall and see if there are any cracks allowing air to the cord structure. That is where the failure will most likely occur. If there are cracks, the tire is beyond its useful life. If no cracks, it should be a viable tire and still useful and safe. On the other hand, for the price of a tire that is fresh, flexible, and considered usable under all circumstances, is a lot better than my Butt trying to hang on to the seat, if that old tire blows out. Let along the heart rate that a failure would cause in this old man!!!!
Mel
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,312 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,172 Posts
I had a rear tire blow out in 1977 on a Yamaha 650 at 65 MPH. I was 2 up with the owner of the bike. I kept it together but she was all over the place until I got it stopped. My rear tire is going to be 10 years old next year so I think next year I'll change it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,749 Posts
Could not answer poll as I just replaced the rear TW tire after having the bike a few months.
Missing choice of every year.:(
With my other bike it gets a new rear tire at least once a year, those 80 dirt, 20 street tires don't last long on the road. The front has been changed 3 times in 6 years.

If there are any cracks in the side wall get rid of them - car tire manufactures claim the life span is 7 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,790 Posts
I'd probably go 10 years, but mine wear out quicker than that! If the rubber got hard or cracked or shows some other type of deterioration, I'd replace it no matter the age.

17 year old tire, no telling what could happen no matter how well taken care of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
My personal recommendation is never run a tire older than five years. While I have too many fully operational bikes in the stable, none have tires older than five years, though the most recent TW rear tire is 12 ( a new one is on order). Fresh rubber on the ground or pavement is cheap insurance. My skin is too hard to grow at this age....I just won't take the chance. Some recommend replacement after 10 years. I do not. I also return newly shipped tires to the big box stores that are older than 1 year. Does not happen often, but it does happen, so read the date on the tires you buy. Tire codes are easy. Four digits after the DOT numbers letters are week and year of manufacture.

Pictures are examples of tire codes. See the links below to read up on tires and age and other good content.

Motorcycle Tire Guide 101 and FAQ - Common Tread - RevZilla

www.motorcycle-superstore.com/.../motorcycle-tires-buyers-guide.aspx

My tires look like this. Rear tire born the week of May 19th of 2003 (2103),
1 (2).jpg

and new front Shinko 241 born the week of March 23rd of 2015 (1315).
1 (1).jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: jeffrolives

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,312 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The TW34 is discontinued — (I blame RobG for upsetting them) — some still available on Ebay in the states, but here in the UK that’s yer lot — everywhere is saying “not available”.

That leaves (in the UK) the vee-rubber jobby — (soft as shit, disintegrates at the first sign of rock) — or the Dunlop K180, which duplicates the tread pattern of the dreaded “Death Wing” — I wish them luck with that one, they’ll need it …..

Seems I have two choices in the UK — either import a TW34 from the states from Ebay — or wait to see if Bridgestone eventually come up with something else.

Looks like we’ll be starting a “Rear Tire Options” thread soon …………….
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Discontinued??? Wow, interesting. Glad I got mine when I did.

I don't see how they could be upset yet; the letter is still sitting on my desk here to go in the mailbox. I'm pretty lazy and forgetful. Hoping to mail it today or tomorrow. :)

In that case, crap, keep your existing tire til you can find a replacement. Just keep a very close eye on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
Regardless of what they look like and how much tread is on them -- As tires age, the rubber gets harder and brittle, and loses its' grip on the road. If you just want to use the bike off-road, then that tire is probably OK, but if you do a significant amount of on-road or highway riding, it's way more safe to replace it. Your choice, your skin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,046 Posts
I also return newly shipped tires to the big box stores that are older than 1 year. Does not happen often, but it does happen, so read the date on the tires you buy. Tire codes are easy. Four digits after the DOT numbers letters are week and year of manufacture.
To add to ^^^^^^^
Also (from what I've read) there are lubricating compounds in the rubber of the tires that are supposed to keep the rubber supple. It keeps working around by the natural movement of the tire on the road. If the tire sits for long extended periods of time; the lubrication does not get distributed and hence- the drying/cracking degradation of the tire. Thus a perfect looking 10 year old brand new tire sitting on a shelf could be dangerous in use. That same lubrication is damaged by products that they sell to make your tires shine, so unless you have a show bike/car; it is recommended that you do not use those products. -J-
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,142 Posts
At just barely under the Mach 1 speeds that you travel Mike, that's probably a good idea.

(Thankfully he mercifully travels at just under Mach 1, so that windows in nearby towns don't shatter.) :p
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top