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I rode Bob's TW in the sand today. Wow, wow, wow... What a difference a tire (or two) makes. I'm still running stock tires and Bob has a Michelin Starcross Medium on the front and a Duro on the back. So so very much more stable than stock; almost incomparably so. I'd alway put off swapping tires because I couldn't imagine it would make that much of a difference. Boy, am I dumb haha..

Wise man once say: If you don't like how your car handles, change the tires. This goes double or quadruple for bikes, I think.
 

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Can't go wrong with either a Shinko 244 or 241 for the front. Both affordable and infinitely superior to a 16 year old DeathWing stock front tire. Please change for safety's sake to anything newer. 244.jpg shinko241.jpg

For rear stock TrailWing 34 is the default tire for duel purposing. This is the easy solution for most of your riding. tw34.jpg

For a bit more cost and complexity you can get a lot more performance from any of the ATV tire options. Good for playing in mud, snow and sand, I love mine. Duro has been the default ATV tire for years but has been eclipsed by Cerros and most recently by the new Duro Powergrip V2. v2.jpg
 

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In regards to the Shinko 244 and 241, what’s more popular, the skinny or fat? Or is it just preference?
 

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Preference, but I think most go with the wider one.
In regards to the Shinko 244 and 241, what’s more popular, the skinny or fat? Or is it just preference?
 

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For rear stock TrailWing 34 is the default tire for duel purposing. This is the easy solution for most of your riding. View attachment 152170

For a bit more cost and complexity you can get a lot more performance from any of the ATV tire options. Good for playing in mud, snow and sand, I love mine. Duro has been the default ATV tire for years but has been eclipsed by Cerros and most recently by the new Duro Powergrip V2. View attachment 152178

So, inquiring minds must ask;

1) No ATV tire is DOT approved....correct?

2) Of the three ATV tires mentioned above, can they all be mounted onto the stock rear rim with no major modifications?

3) Generally of the three mentioned how do they rate in price and does any one of them stand out above the other two?

Thanks to all who reply as any input you can provide will certainly be helpful and appreciated.
 

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Some ATV tires ARE D.O.T. approved.

Some people have blown up tires and damaged rims; trying to mount stock atv tires (using extremely high pressures - which may have harmed the integrity of the tire even if it mounts).
Some shops with cages have even given up after attempting. Other folks here have had success. Some trim the bead; which can also be an integrity issue. The trailer wheel mods seem to be the way to go and there has been no report of either style of hub set-up or trailer wheel failing.
 

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While time consuming for the researcher to go back and look up old posts all the answers are there in regards to tires and installation tips.
For example one can simply Google "D.O.T. approved ATV tires" and get about 129,000 responses in seconds. Google Search often works better than the Forum's Search features.

What is more time consuming is to ask for someone else to do this on the forum and then wait for someone to respond with a re-invention of these old informative posts. This can take days. Sometimes it is like shouting down a well, no answer is forthcoming.

Sure, nothing wrong with asking questions. But what works quicker when the answer is important to you is to spend a bit of energy and try to dig up the answers directly first before requesting assistance. Identify what research you tried unsuccessfully when an accurate answer is important.
If getting an answer is not that important or time dependent then go ahead and wait for our opinions to filter in. We specialize in small talk here.:p
 

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Hi Fred, thank you as you do bring up some valid points. Certainly for #1 a quick Google search would have proved the answer. The answer for #2 is likely sprinkled around in various past threads and although I did not try to research this time I have completed many previous searches and not always with success, perhaps if one was willing to devote a lot of time the answers would/could be found.....perhaps when I retire that will be a viable option. Question #3 really only applies to this forum since there are not many other bikes with a 14" rim, likely plenty of reviews on ATV sites however that might be akin to asking regular or premium on a lawn tractor forum, lots of opinions no doubt but not really relevant to a TW. Lastly since I am located in Ontario Canada and we are in the dead of winter there was certainly no urgency to my questions. Ok, looks like venting Friday is off and running. lol
 

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Sorry, in a anti-socialist, self-deterministic rant mood today. Seize the day! Chart your own course through life! As old Charley Shakespeare's Hamlet would say: "Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles
And by opposing end them."

So, rant over and time to be polite:

1) Believe only one of us run an D.O.T. approved ATV tire, a Carlyle(?)
2) TW34 mounts up without modification but with difficulty due to stiffness. ATV tires benefit from bead trimming on stock rim, or rim cut-n-weld, or trailer wheel replacement.
3). Conflicting criteria make no definitive single answer and is subject to personal preference. The ATV tire option is the most expensive but gives me the best results IMHO.

 

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Hey Fred....no problem, no harm no foul! Truth be told I can be real cranky some days too, that's what sometimes happens after 6 decades on this rock we all call home!

I do appreciate all the answers you provided as you are always a wealth of knowledge. :eek:ccasion14: :icon_thumbright:
 

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So, inquiring minds must ask;

1) No ATV tire is DOT approved....correct?

2) Of the three ATV tires mentioned above, can they all be mounted onto the stock rear rim with no major modifications?

3) Generally of the three mentioned how do they rate in price and does any one of them stand out above the other two?

Thanks to all who reply as any input you can provide will certainly be helpful and appreciated.

1. I'm not sure if my Ceros is DOT approved. I've never been checked, never heard of anyone being checked, and we don't have annual motorcycle inspections so not a concern that way. Idaho answers. Different states have different requirements/inspections so this could be a thing to watch out for in those states. Easy enough to mount a stock TW tire for an inspection should you have an extra rim or TW to get it from.

2. I've only experienced the Ceros so most of my opinion is from this. I have read information on the forum for the old Duro so I will share some important things I've learned from reading about those who've mounted or used them. I have no knowledge or experience to share on the new Duro and don't want to make stuff up so I don't have anything to mention on that one.

For the stock 14" rim. I did not have to trim the bead to get it mounted. I did have to use extremely high PSI 80-90 PSI like the Duro. I used a inflation extension so I didn't have to stand so close when inflating. Here in the USA I was only able to find a 14" Ceros in one size, 26x9x14. It is much taller than a stock tire and you have to mount it more to the rear in the swing arm so it clears the front of the swing arm. Width is only a problem with trying to have the tire to far forward in the swing arm. Otherwise it clears the swing arm find. You'll have to go to a larger rear sprocket to keep it geared like stock. About 14/55 is close to 14/50 with stock tire.

On my wife's TW I converted her's to the trailer wheel mod. Tire sizes and types of tires one can use is much greater. We use a Ceros 25x8x12 on her's and it's much closer to the stock rear tire size. When my Ceros wears out I'm gonna do the trailer wheel mod.

Duro. I've read that the overwhelming number of riders who've mounted this tire they had to trim the bead in order for it to seat. I've also read many of these tires have exploded when inflating them. I suspect trimming the bead has weakened it.

I have ridden a TW with the Duro and because it's a little square you have to lean harder (best way I can say it) to get it to lean we cornering. The Ceros is a little like this but less because it has a more rounded profile.

I've read the newer Duro is more rounded like the Ceros.

3. Prices can vary so much but generally I'd call them pretty close to one another. Oh, you'll find one cheaper than the other at place A, but place B might have the other one cheaper.

This is my opinion but I think the Duro may do slightly better than the Ceros in sand/mud because of it's tread design but it's still close. I've gone through a marsh I would have just spun with the stock tire. Both are way above the stock tire in sand. Ceros probably a little better on hard gravel/dirt roads and pavement due to it's more rounded profile I mentioned above.

Well, that's about all I can think of for now. Probably could talk for hours about them if in person sitting around a fire drinking some brewski's but alas, not to be today.

Have a good one (day that is). :D
 

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Interestingly enough the assumptions I made expecting poor on-road performance such as irregular adhesion, noise, vibration, slow acceleration etc. with the Duro never became that apparent once I got one. I have no experience on just how hard one can push a street oriented TW rear tire but the Duro has not been a disappointment on twisty asphalt for me so far. Wear is getting noticeable after 6,000 miles but still gobs more useful rubber than a new TW34..
The one pavement slide I had was cornering with the stock TW34 where my Shinko 244 Golden Boy front tire held it's grip on some sand and pine needles but once the TW34 hit the same loose material the rear spun out and down I went.
I did notice that with Duro, low tire pressures and gearing changes (13x55) my mileage has plummeted from ~70 mpg to a remarkably uniform 50 mpg.
 

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While time consuming for the researcher to go back and look up old posts all the answers are there in regards to tires and installation tips.
For example one can simply Google "D.O.T. approved ATV tires" and get about 129,000 responses in seconds. Google Search often works better than the Forum's Search features.

What is more time consuming is to ask for someone else to do this on the forum and then wait for someone to respond with a re-invention of these old informative posts. This can take days. Sometimes it is like shouting down a well, no answer is forthcoming.

Sure, nothing wrong with asking questions. But what works quicker when the answer is important to you is to spend a bit of energy and try to dig up the answers directly first before requesting assistance. Identify what research you tried unsuccessfully when an accurate answer is important.
If getting an answer is not that important or time dependent then go ahead and wait for our opinions to filter in. We specialize in small talk here.:p
i love this Fred, hope you don't mind if i use this quote.
 

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I believe the duros that have exploded were cold and could not stretch. They are only rated to 20 psi. When I mounted mine I did trim the bead and had the tire warm 80 degrees and only filled it to 60 psi and then put it in a small room with a heater where it got up over 100 degrees and seated itself.
 

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I just returned from a ride to the snowline using stock tired TW. It will get you in and out of most places, just entails a bit more swimming and effort than with the Duro. Freeze/thaw bulked up muds liquify just as easily beneath a stock tire as beneath a Duro; it is just that with the Duro you are likely farther from terra firma and help when you do get stuck. :p
Enough snow will stop us all. Today what did me in was 4 inches of muajaq, or whatever Inuit word they use for "snow that stops motorcycle cold".

As far as tire width goes 9 inches with a 26 inch tire height does not leave much clearance for those with stock length swing arms. One more advantage of the 12" trailer wheel conversion is the greater selection of shorter, narrower and lighter tires that still offer the aggressive tread the TrailWings lack.
 

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I have searched "trailer" and "Trailer wheel" but coming up with nothing, can someone clue me in on what the deal is and how this conversion works. Sounds like the way to go for running an atv rear tire.
 

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The real benefit of the atv tire and trailer wheel is no more tubes and a simple plug kit will fix your worries
I think the Duro has such a stiff side wall that you would not notice if it went flat on the trail.
 
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