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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Running Bridgestone TW203-204 street tires.

Very happy with them.

Running 22 psi front

Running 25 psi rear

Great combo for wet and dry weather.

Say I want to ride several miles to an off road location, then want to

lower the tire pressures down. Will it matter that the tires hot?

And how will it be accurate airing back up with the tire hot?

Just wondering?

Maybe Jerry can offer some advice as usual.

Thanks

Larry
 

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Your 'warm' pressures will be greater than when they're 'cold'. There will be a formula which will work out how many degrees warmer will equal an increase in pressure; but for us mortals it's about stuff-all.



From memory, it's around 2psi difference at the most from warm to hot on street bikes.



With something as gingerly as the TW, it isn't going to be a make or break decision.



To be able to interpret the results at your 'air-down' destination, you would also have to measure how hot your tyres/tires were, and are now. Something which I imagine would be quite difficult.



To get around it, if it isn't too far; you could set them at home and run the few miles on slightly lower pressures. I've ran as low as 6psi front and rear on the street for short distances without a drama.
 

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I agree with Turborob. Pressure related to temperature is very forgiving for something like the fat tired tw. Now don't take this advice for your 10 ton motorhome in deciding between 45 and 95 psi because that will blow the tires off the rig after a few hours. But riding the TW a bit soft is no big deal especially if you compensate for the softer pressure with a slow down and less drastic cornering. You can tell the difference between 18 and 25 on wash board roads and between 10 and 18 on the highway but neither is going to do major damage unless you are ramming it at 65 plus with the 10 psi tires and then you might be more like to skid out on a corner or hit a death wobble after a major chuckhole. Bottom line, if you psi is not correct for the riding conditions, slow down and don't take any chances that you are challenging the rubber on the road. My humble perspective.

Tom
 

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Set pressure just before leaving on your ride. Check pressure when you arrive at your airing down location. If it has changed by 1 pound, change new pressure by 1 pound. If it has changed by 2 pounds, change new pressure by 2 pounds. Works for me.
 

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I like the way Qwerty thinks. I also agree totally that the TW is very forgiving of low tire pressure. I have ridden as far as 150 miles at 18 psi for a dual sport ride. Mabye 50% was offroad. My original tires are holding up quite well with a lot of low pressure riding on them. I have ridden as low as 12 psi and have never noticed unusual handling. Huge improvmenent offroad after dropping the pressure especially if it is wet and muddy.



Brad
 
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