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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks!

I'm a new owner of a 2018 Tw 200 and I've been reading thru all of the posts here and the first thing usually mentioned is to replace the front tire.
At first I thought well just ride with what you have and replace it when it wears out.
Then I went off road.
The first hill climb with a puddle in the middle of it and the front tire washed out and threw me to the ground. LOL it was so fast I did not even have time to put my feet down.
I should have listened to all you nice folks.

So off to Rocky MT ATV/MC to pick a new tire.

I've got the Pirelli MT 43 4.00x18 64p on my wish list.
Now the reviews for this tire is great but it may raise the height of the bike by 1 inch.
The 1 inch thing may be a problem because I'm already on tip-toe at 5'3.
This tire gets great reviews in sand and dry areas but not much is mentioned about the muddy, rocky, snot we can see here in New England.
This tire also gets high grades for high speed road behavior.

Second choice

The forum favorite is the Shinko SR241 4.00x18 64p
This is popular tire because of the price, but the reviews do not mention to much about road behavior or off road traction in the east coast snot.
There is no mention about this tire raising the height of the bike.
But I have to also take into account how popular this tire is in this community.

So I guess I just need to know if I'm picking the right size tire and will the stock tube work with this tire?
And which tire should I pick for the rocky muck I may see here on the east coast.

Thanks!
T.
 

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The 241 is a good all-rounder – very few tires are recommended for their price

I have no experience of the Pirelli – but I will say that if it raises the front by an inch, this can be countered by lowering the forks in the triple trees – but at the end of the day, it’s your in-seam that counts
 

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Lowering the forks may also reduce suspension travel and you only have ~ 6 inches max to play with.
With forks raised as much as possible on full compression there is only about a half inch of clearance before top of fender hits bottom of triple clamps. Lowering forks one inch means fender will bottom out on clamps that much sooner.
Replacing OEM fender with a high mounted fender reclaims a bit of clearance, this is popular with off-roaders here and especially those who deal with mud. Stock fender has minimal clearance with tire and it is very easy to get enough mud build-up so that tire will no longer turn. This problem is aggravated by a taller tire.
Raising the fender or carrying a good tool to dig mud, stones and twigs out of tiny gap between fender and tire whenever that tire stops rolling might be a good idea if your mud has a gummy clay nature. Mud induced wheel lock is no fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lowering the forks may also reduce suspension travel and you only have ~ 6 inches max to play with.
With forks raised as much as possible on full compression there is only about a half inch of clearance before top of fender hits bottom of triple clamps. Lowering forks one inch means fender will bottom out on clamps that much sooner.
Replacing OEM fender with a high mounted fender reclaims a bit of clearance, this is popular with off-roaders here and especially those who deal with mud. Stock fender has minimal clearance with tire and it is very easy to get enough mud build-up so that tire will no longer turn. This problem is aggravated by a taller tire.
Raising the fender or carrying a good tool to dig mud, stones and twigs out of tiny gap between fender and tire whenever that tire stops rolling might be a good idea if your mud has a gummy clay nature. Mud induced wheel lock is no fun.

Thanks your input Fred!

Will the Shinko 241 raise the bike also or is the sidewall softer?
 

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It's a very soft sidewall and it is very close to stock in it's stance. It's also very easy to install compared to the stock or shinko 244. The 244 is too hard for colder climates.

I ride it off road and in the north eastern terrain it does very well. My only concern is with deeper mud which I've yet to experience but in shallower mud it's soft flexible knobs clear mud easily if moving fast enough. It might not be the best in some exteme conditions but over all it is really good in a variety of terrains. I ran it all winter in the snow on wet roots, moss, loam, dirt road, sand, mud, rock. Great tire.
 

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Hi folks!

I'm a new owner of a 2018 Tw 200 and I've been reading thru all of the posts here and the first thing usually mentioned is to replace the front tire.
At first I thought well just ride with what you have and replace it when it wears out.
Then I went off road.
The first hill climb with a puddle in the middle of it and the front tire washed out and threw me to the ground. LOL it was so fast I did not even have time to put my feet down.
I should have listened to all you nice folks.

So off to Rocky MT ATV/MC to pick a new tire.

I've got the Pirelli MT 43 4.00x18 64p on my wish list.
Now the reviews for this tire is great but it may raise the height of the bike by 1 inch.
The 1 inch thing may be a problem because I'm already on tip-toe at 5'3.
This tire gets great reviews in sand and dry areas but not much is mentioned about the muddy, rocky, snot we can see here in New England.
This tire also gets high grades for high speed road behavior.

Second choice

The forum favorite is the Shinko SR241 4.00x18 64p
This is popular tire because of the price, but the reviews do not mention to much about road behavior or off road traction in the east coast snot.
There is no mention about this tire raising the height of the bike.
But I have to also take into account how popular this tire is in this community.

So I guess I just need to know if I'm picking the right size tire and will the stock tube work with this tire?
And which tire should I pick for the rocky muck I may see here on the east coast.

Thanks!
T.
I would take a look at the 244 as well. My .02 based off experience is the 241 is not the best tire for mud. The 244 is a significant enough improvement that its worth looking at over the 241. A good friend of mine had a 241 on the front of his and up here in New England he was not happy with it. In the heavy loam based mud we have here in the spring it would just load up, not clean itself and become a racing slick. I rode with his bike a bunch of times to get a comparison and the 241 was not a tire i would choose for loose loam and mud like we have here.

On road i have never rode the 241 but i can tall you the 244 is great.
 

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the 606 looks alot like the maxxis 6006 that I had for several years that has been discontinued. Only problem I had was it cupped pretty fast and after I put on a 241 boy could I feel the difference. Bike was a joy to ride again.
 

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If you prefer the 244 over the 241 it's because you've never ridden them both in the colder months. Once frost hits, the heavy hard rubber of the 244 might as well be greased. It is only DOT in Nova Scotia for 4 months of the year and for good reason. The climate and terrain here is nearly identical.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you for all the input! This helps a lot!

So my size choices are ok? What about using the stock tube? Should I get a Heavy duty tube to go with the 241? Which tube would you suggest?
 

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You might wish to keep the stock inner tube. One of mine is 15 years old and has been inside three tires and 12,000 plus miles without any leaks or problems. Besides your tire/tube/rim/brake assembly is a heavy enough gyroscope as is. If you wanted more weight to curb that annoying wheeling then I would recommend RideOn tire sealant and balancer over the weight of a thicker tube. RideOn been very,very good to me. The rear on Betty Boop here still has a penetrating 6d nail after three years and thousand of miles with no lost air due to RideOn. I'm sold.
 

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So my size choices are ok? What about using the stock tube? Should I get a Heavy duty tube to go with the 241? Which tube would you suggest?
Get the 241 4.00/18 if you do any riding on pavement. You won't feel any difference in ride height. With a new stock tube on a 2018, just leave it in there, you will be fine for 5 years. Put Ride On in the stock tubes, it will be very unlikely you will ever have a flat that you won't be able to ride home.

Once you get that done, start reading about the fork mods. It is a sure thing you don't have enough oil in there if you weigh over 140 lbs. Easy to fix, you don't even have to remove the forks, just spacers and springs to measure the level.
 

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If you prefer the 244 over the 241 it's because you've never ridden them both in the colder months. Once frost hits, the heavy hard rubber of the 244 might as well be greased. It is only DOT in Nova Scotia for 4 months of the year and for good reason. The climate and terrain here is nearly identical.
I ride mine with the 244 12 months a year regardless of the temp. I have never had an issue with grip even in snow.


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Do not get the shinko for the love of God don't get that garbage they fly apart
I've now had 3 Shinkos with no issues. Only the Pirelli flew apart. I deleted the photo since it was out of warranty and they didn't want to do anything about it. Pirelli was only 3 years old and got horizontal delamination almost across the whole tire. It looked like a big cut but wasn't. I could see the Shinko issue if you get the wrong speed or load rating. Some are rated very low and could be dangerous if the wrong tire for the bike was selected.

I forgot to mention, my post referred to brands not tires specific to the TW. I
 

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i have 3 bikes with the 241. one bike came with the 244 on it and i couldn't get them off fast enough! i installed a pirelli on the front of my T Dub and ended up with the death wobble, so now it is the 241 only on my lighter bikes. as far as these tires flying apart, i've never seen it happen. i've never had any traction problems with the 241, even in short blasts of mud
 
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