TW200 Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I replaced the OEM Bridgestone front trie with a Shinko 700, just love the tire for the price, good traction on pavement and dirt. My only question is it seems to wear uneven on a slope, more at the back of the threads then in front. Need advise on if the problem could be caused by incorrect tire inflation or improper wheel balancing
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,991 Posts
It's normal with a lot of tires. You can turn them around and remount them and even them out if you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,413 Posts
I replaced the OEM Bridgestone front trie with a Shinko 700, just love the tire for the price, good traction on pavement and dirt. My only question is it seems to wear uneven on a slope, more at the back of the threads then in front. Need advise on if the problem could be caused by incorrect tire inflation or improper wheel balancing
Looks normal to me. At least in the sense that my factory front tire wore the same way.


Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,413 Posts
Switch your wallet to the other pocket when you ride. Watch wear. When it evens out, remove wallet and ride with out it.
I'm equally poor weather riding with or without my wallet:(


Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,106 Posts
You are braking to hard with the front wheel. The rear tire doesn't wear that way because braking is counterbalanced with acceleration.

As LT suggested, you can flip the tire over to even out the wear but if you don't change your ways it will just happen again.

Suggestions: When riding on asphalt increase the tire pressure 10 or 15 lbs. above what you run now. I use 30 psi in my front tires. Also, concentrate using the rear brake more, or to a greater degree, than the front. (Of course in an emergency use them both to the max!) Practice stopping with the rear brake only then add in the front brake once you get the feel for what the rear brake only will do. Good luck.

I wore out a couple of Bridgestones before I figured out what was going on. Here is a picture of one.

P7050811.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
You are braking to hard with the front wheel. The rear tire doesn't wear that way because braking is counterbalanced with acceleration.

As LT suggested, you can flip the tire over to even out the wear but if you don't change your ways it will just happen again.

Suggestions: When riding on asphalt increase the tire pressure 10 or 15 lbs. above what you run now. I use 30 psi in my front tires. Also, concentrate using the rear brake more, or to a greater degree, than the front. (Of course in an emergency use them both to the max!) Practice stopping with the rear brake only then add in the front brake once you get the feel for what the rear brake only will do. Good luck.

I wore out a couple of Bridgestones before I figured out what was going on. Here is a picture of one.

View attachment 136113
That front knobby tire wear is caused by sustained high speed pavement riding. In that case it is 50-55 mph on a TW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
You are braking to hard with the front wheel. The rear tire doesn't wear that way because braking is counterbalanced with acceleration.

As LT suggested, you can flip the tire over to even out the wear but if you don't change your ways it will just happen again.

Suggestions: When riding on asphalt increase the tire pressure 10 or 15 lbs. above what you run now. I use 30 psi in my front tires. Also, concentrate using the rear brake more, or to a greater degree, than the front. (Of course in an emergency use them both to the max!) Practice stopping with the rear brake only then add in the front brake once you get the feel for what the rear brake only will do. Good luck.

I wore out a couple of Bridgestones before I figured out what was going on. Here is a picture of one.

View attachment 136113
Thanks alot, will try this out!!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top