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Discussion Starter #1
I am replacing the tires on my 1500 Vulcan. Called the bike shop and the quote was over 800 dollars for both tires. I went to moto sports to check tire prices, a bit over 200 for both tires and 20 more for a set of brake pads. I guess you know who will be replacing my tires. Luckily I have a bike jack and they are tubeless, can't be 600 in labor lol. Having them off will make polishing the rims much easier.
 

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Lotsa places out there who will bend you over and not even buy you dinner...:eek:
 

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Sounds about right. Dealers and most shops charge full MSRP for tires (that can often be had for 50-60% of that online), and "on the bike"- meaning ride in, ride out service- generally charge anywhere form $60-$100 a wheel to remove and reinstall to the bike. If you remove the wheels yourself it's usually more like $30-$40 a wheel for just the mount/balance, but lots of shops won't mount tires they didn't sell. The dealer I used to work at used to get $6-700 pretty routinely for a ride-in tire change. $300 for the rear tire, $200 for the front, $150 to remove, mount, balance, reinstall the wheels, plus tax, tire disposal fee, blah blah. When customers would get sticker shock at the quote I'd slip them the card for a buddy who did basic service out of his garage most evenings. He'd generally get the job done for about half that and still make some decent money for his time.

Jake Wilson (which has since been merged into Rocky Mountain ATV, the website now redirects to RMATV) consistently has the best prices I can find on tires. Often by only a couple bucks vs Revzilla or Dennis Kirk, but hey, cheaper is cheaper.

Changing tubeless tires by hand is not an easy task though. It's not like spooning a tire onto a dirt bike. The beads are much stronger/tighter. You'll also have to make a tool to break the beads initially, which if it's been a while can take some serious force. I'd find an independent shop or look on craigslist to see if someone local does it. It's not impossible, but to me $20 for a local guy to do it with a machine is well worth saving the hassle.
 

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I'm fortunate to have a good easy going mechanic close by. I buy my own tires from Bike Bandit, remove wheel and bring it along with new tire to the guy and he charges 20 to 30 to make the switcharo. Nice way to go for my bikes and ATVs.
 

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I found a local car tire shop that charged me ten bucks to install, five bucks to remove. Didn't balance installed tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
After taking care of some chores I figured I would tackle the tire thing. Took me about an hour to change out the front tire. Not a big deal at all. Really wasn't that much harder than doing a TW. No tube, nice. To break it down off the bead I used a C clamp. Used a 2x6 on the off side and put the screw right at the bead and tightened down until it slipped down, was easy really. Peeled the one side off then flipped and did the same for the other. Putting back on was simple. Used some soap around the bead, put a ratchet strap on and tightened so it would seat enough to take air and as it started to inflate let the ratchet go. Really was a simple task. I had new brake pads to put on, but they were not warn enough to change so will have them for the next tire change out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Took care of the rear this morning and had a new windshield made. I just take the old one off, take it to the local glass shop and have one cut out of poly. little over 50 our the door. Nice to have it cleaned up, new tires and perfect windscreen to look through. Put a new battery in the Goldwing and it is good to go also. Nice to be ready for the summer fun.
 
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