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Discussion Starter #1
Is there one that covers most of the TDubs fasteners? I’m budget challenged. I really should put this thing back together properly. I have a propensity for hamfistedness. Thanks and cheers
 

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The key to small fasteners is A: At least for the TW manual, the values are often 20% too high, especially for those fasteners that get repeatedly removed, i.e. the oil filter cover.
B: Any torque wrench is most accurate in the middle 2/3rds of its range, which is why using a 3/8 drive with a 3/8 to 1/4 adapter for values down around 10 ft./lbs is a bad idea.

Just as a tidbit of interest, I just swapped out the OEM 14 tooth counter sprocket for a 13 tooth on a brand new 2018, and found the bolts on the left case varying from as low as 40 inch/lbs. to 70 inch/lbs. When I put it all back together (happily not crushing the wires!) I used 70 inch/lbs., which is slightly less than 20% below the spec of 84. I use the the same on the oil filter cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Couple more related questions:

1. What locktite or bolt dressing do you guys swear by (that provides easier removal later)?

2. When they’re stuck, what do you do/use?

I’ve used one or combinations of the following:

PB Blaster
Specialty removal bits (never worked for me)
Heat
Drill and tap

Anybody ever try candle wax?
 
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Blue locktite
Electric or air impact gun. The WR250r front sprocket is torqued to 90 ft-lbs and the in impact gun is the best way to get it off.
 

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Place bit on head – smack with hammer – then try turning

Something I learned from years ago, is that if you’re dealing with something like an engine casing with 8 bolts, just loosen them up one at a time – just half a turn – then, if there’s one that’s stuck or sheers, you can tighten the others back up and ride for parts …..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Place bit on head — smack with hammer — then try turning

Something I learned from years ago, is that if you’re dealing with something like an engine casing with 8 bolts, just loosen them up one at a time — just half a turn — then, if there’s one that’s stuck or sheers, you can tighten the others back up and ride for parts …..
Purple - thanks for the tip. My Dad left this to me. I’ve never used it. I forgot I had it. I’ve heard you smack it with a hammer while turning. It’s spring loaded. Supposed to work like an impact gun. Supposedly the impact breaks the bond between the rust and metal. I’ll let you know if it works. Cheers
 

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I think the Harbor Freight units are good enough, as long as you remember to release the tension between uses to keep them reasonably accurate. They are crude, but do the job if their cared for properly. The biggest thing is to use the proper sized ratchet for the job, and materials being tightened. Personally, I go by feel and the components being tightened. if it's aluminum I usually just snug it down pretty good. Iron or steel, I usually tighten it down pretty snugly depending on the size of the ratchet or wrench being used. If you adapt your wrench size up, be gentle, adapt down and crank it. It's all in the feel. And when threads start to give you generally feel it, but then it's too late anyway.
 

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Purple - thanks for the tip. My Dad left this to me. I’ve never used it. I forgot I had it. I’ve heard you smack it with a hammer while turning. It’s spring loaded. Supposed to work like an impact gun. Supposedly the impact breaks the bond between the rust and metal. I’ll let you know if it works. Cheers
I'm still using the same one I've had since the late 60's. They work great but just make sure to use the correct size socket/screw tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Notice all the socket adapters in the picture. I can’t find the original bits and they are a larger size and I couldn’t find reasonably priced replacements. If anyone has a link to cheap replacement bits, please let me know. Also any videos or instructions for changing from forward (tighten) to reverse (loosen). And maintenance/lubrication tips. I’d rather not take a hammer in anger to this thing until I’m comfortable that I know I’m doing it right. Thanks and cheers
 
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I would buy an inch pound torque wrench for the smaller fastners. I normally just tighten until snug. Small stuff is too easy to strip out.
I like the 20% less torque as mentioned above, great idea. My good click type torque wrench starts at 20 ft#. I tried 20 once as it stripped them out never clicking. I use the old bar type torque wrench for much of my smaller stuff. It would be great if they could add a ratcheting head on it though.
 
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