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I haven't ridden motorcycles for the last 35 years, but I mainly ride ATV's. I'm used to running 3-6psi in the ATV tires, but how low can you go with the TW for slow trail riding? I was thinking of around 12 psi for the front and 10 for the rear. Is this too low?
 

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I asked the same question when I got mine..18 front and rear was the average answer for street and trail use. That's what I ended up running since I got it, and it seems to work fine for 60/40 use.
And if you scroll to the bottom of the page, there will be a bunch of air pressure threads linked in the 'Similar Threads' area. Should be a wealth of info there.
 

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I haven't ridden motorcycles for the last 35 years, but I mainly ride ATV's. I'm used to running 3-6psi in the ATV tires, but how low can you go with the TW for slow trail riding? I was thinking of around 12 psi for the front and 10 for the rear. Is this too low?
First, I'll say you should experiment with the tire pressures to see what you feel and may like. Experiment for your own experience is the best way because the rest of us can only offer our opinion of what we feel. Though the TW doesn't have as much power as other off-road bikes which can slip the tire on the rim if psi is too low, you probably don't want to go as low as you mention you do on your ATV. I think I've been as low as 9 psi on the rear and it was fine but only off-road. For a little combo off-road/pavement I like to stay in the 10-12 psi range. However, I don't want to ride a lot of pavement with this psi but its fine traction wise I just don't want to wear out the tires on pavement running low psi.

Having said that, here is my(our) experience with air pressures for our TW's. With any of the tires I use (stockers, aftermarket Shinko 244 or 241's on front. or our ATV Rear Tire Mod's (Maxxis Ceros), I run between 10-12 in all of them and do just fine.

PSI. on or off-road is fairly subjective as to what each individual feels or believe we feel for traction. Some people like and do just fine with 16 lbs or even 18 lbs off-road. For Mrs. Admiral and I, we both feel we a softer ride over rocks without bouncing over them and better traction (grip). Same for riding sand/dirt/gravel. I suspect you are aware of some of these factors having ridden an ATV. Even on an ATV one wants to experiment air pressure.
 

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The lowest I use is 12 front and 14 rear, but only if I am going to be in softer dirt/sand. Usually I use 16/18 on rocky trails (typical Idaho) and put up with the slightly harsher ride to avoid flats. 16/18 is fine on the highway for distances under ten miles. I ride rather slowly compared to most, but sharp rocks and low inflation don't mix well. Knock on wood, I've never had a flat in 15,000 miles.
 

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8 to 10 psi in the front trials tire for trails.
18 to 20 for road.

No idea what I have in the Duro right now, but it does better on the road with more pressure.

As Admitral said, you need to see what you like.
 

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I usually run our rear tires 12 to 18 and shinko 241 fronts at 10 to 12. In loose/sandy stuff I often run my wifes front as low as 6 depending on where we are riding and reminder her to watch for the larger rocks. shes 130 lb and not aggressive with the brakes.
 

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A lot of it is to do with rider and other load rates – the trick is to get those tires to “flex”, as they make up for a lot of shortcomings in the suspension – but over rocky ground (think “Fred”), there has to be enough pressure to protect the rims ……
 

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Matter of personnel preference, experiment on what feels comfortable. Donzo was happier with higher pressures after he tried the lower pressures I urged. So go with what feels secure in your terrain.. I’ve always liked relatively low 10 to 12 psi off-road riding and never had a pinch flat or damaged rim. I once went down into a snowy canyon when I should not have and had to use 4 psi in the rear to lower the ground contact pressure enough to churn my way back out. Extremely squirrelly , first gear only and done out of self-inflicted desperation.
 

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25 to 30 lbs. in the front and 20 to 25 lbs. in the rear. I do 99% riding on asphalt. If I come to a dirt trail I don't change a thing. The air pressure is correct 99% of the time and that is good enough for me.
 

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I run 12 psi in the front and rear when off-road. I notice a huge difference in just a couple pounds of pressure. I had a buddy who was hesitant to lower his 20psi to 14, but after a mile or so on rocky forest service roads, he decided to give it a try. He smiled after the next mile with lower pressure and said he couldn't believe how much more enjoyable the ride was.

I run 22 psi for road use. I carry a Slime power pump to raise the pressure after a ride on dirt to ride home with appropriate pressure.

I left my 244 front tire at 12-14 psi for about 6 months of on-off road use, and the tire wore really strange. The middle nubs didn't wear at all, but the cross-bars in the center of the tire wore down a good 1/4 inch. Makes for a rough ride on pavement now since the center contact points are a good 2 1/2-3 inches apart since they stick out so far. I don't think I'll do that much riding on pavement with lower pressures again. The pump helps keep the pressures where I feel they should be.
 

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I run about the same as the rest, (14-16 lbs). When I know I am doing more or extended on road, I go about 20, its like adding a turbo with the lower rolling resistance. The MT21 is pretty stiff, I have run it about 8lbs. with no issue. Stickks well and clears mud better, but it defintely feels a little loose on pavement that low.
 
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