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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I didn't buy any of the fancy tools because I rebuilt the forks on a Honda CT90 with no problem and figured, 'What could go wrong?' on the TW2redo... I was really unprepared for what I found.

I took the forks apart without really any drama until I got to the seals which were basically petrified into the fork. I had to cut them out, then use dental tools to dig out the solidified rubber which had attempted to become one with the metal. It took me three days to clean it all out, but it was worth it. Those seals leaked horribly and had to be replaced. Check.

The challenge from this point has been working on trying to get the new seals to set down in the groove in the fork so that I can install the inner tube, dust cover and keeper ring. I've tried the electrical tape around the inner tube and using that as a 'stop' to pound down the seal. Didn't work.

Before I go and buy a fork seal driver, what other method would you recommend?
 

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Sorry, I can't recall the size, but I used a large socket....whichever just fit the inside diameter of the fork tube there to insert the seal. Tapped (well harder than tapping, but you get the gist of it) it in with a rubber mallet until seated. Worked great.
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, I can't recall the size, but I used a large socket....whichever just fit the inside diameter of the fork tube there to insert the seal. Tapped (well harder than tapping, but you get the gist of it) it in with a rubber mallet until seated. Worked great.
I actually was going to try that but my sockets just aren't big enough. (That's what she said) I don't know that I want to go out and buy a socket just for this job, but it may be worth getting a fork seal tool at this point.

Now I'm wondering what size? the Inner Tube is 33mm, so do you go with 34mm?
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I used a piece of pvc pipe to get them in place.
That is a perfect idea! I just tried it with no success, but now I am coming to realize that I may have been sold the wrong seals... 😡 Fit for a TW200 my tukus!
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ditto. PVC pipe long enough to place a 2x4 on the top and pound away. Would the trick of chilling the seals in the same manner bearings are chilled to fit work do you suppose?
I think in this case I was sold the wrong seals. Different part # on order now.

As many times as you respond to my inquiries Ski, I should just ask you directly! The PVC pipe is an excellent idea! Didn't work this time around though...

Saw your recent trail ride story and thought that was pretty great. I'm heading to NW CO in very late July (if I can get this damn TW2redo completed!) to ride trails with my 20yo and 16 yo, camping and just generally having a relaxing and great time. Love to see other stories of folks doing the same.
 

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I think in this case I was sold the wrong seals. Different part # on order now.

As many times as you respond to my inquiries Ski, I should just ask you directly! The PVC pipe is an excellent idea! Didn't work this time around though...

Saw your recent trail ride story and thought that was pretty great. I'm heading to NW CO in very late July (if I can get this damn TW2redo completed!) to ride trails with my 20yo and 16 yo, camping and just generally having a relaxing and great time. Love to see other stories of folks doing the same.
The trail ride story continues...

Ain't it a bitch when you are hip deep into a project, cussin' and swarin' only to realize you got the wrong part!! Ha! Father-son rides are the best. The time spent is well rewarded later in life.
 

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You want to drive in the seal from near its OD to not chance damage to the seal. PVC with nice square edges would be fine assuming it fits. I would install them going over the steel fork tube. I will add a recommendation of heating the aluminum slider to where it is jus a little hotter than you can hold on to it to ease the press fit. up to 250 degree F. Got to keep things going in square to not cause distortion of the seal.
 

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You want to drive in the seal from near its OD to not chance damage to the seal. PVC with nice square edges would be fine assuming it fits. I would install them going over the steel fork tube. I will add a recommendation of heating the aluminum slider to where its hoter than you can hold on to it to ease the press fit. up to 250 degree F. Got to keep things going in square to not cause distortion of the seal.
Interesting on the heating up part.

Luckily, I didn't have too difficult time when I installed them on the '09 last summer, and it was my first time ever replacing seals myself. Again, had the near perfect size socket, and with the semi-rounded edges, didn't have to worry about damage to the seal, and like you said it made contact to the OD of the seal. Nice straight drive into place, although it did take some time working away it, but nothing too bad.
 

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I have never heard of seals that hard to remove. I always pack a little extra grease around that clip when I'm finished with the new seal job. Hopefully preventing the removal issues you had.
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have never heard of seals that hard to remove. I always pack a little extra grease around that clip when I'm finished with the new seal job. Hopefully preventing the removal issues you had.
It surprised the heck out of me too. They were almost fused with the aluminum and literally as hard as a rock.

This poor bike was abused by the previous owners. After going through a lot of it, it almost appears to have sat in a flood, but I've not seen a bike that's been through that. I can only guess.
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Guys- I've been wrestling with this for two weeks now... Finally took the two (2) all balls fork seal sets I had to a shop I know and trust and they told me that what I have is too tall, period. They looked at the fork seal, put it in the fork, worked it just a bit, then told me that they are not meant for my forks.
I'm heading to the local Yamaha dealer in the morning to purchase two (2) fork seals at $17 each, but only if they will install them for me to show me that they fit. I'll keep everyone updated.
Here are pics of the current state of the fork seal area. If anyone sees anything which looks unusual, let me know please. Perhaps I have to purchase some new to me forks because something is wrong with what I have?
Automotive tire Tableware Fluid Wood Serveware

Automotive tire Camera lens Crankset Tire Cameras & optics



Here's a pic of it with the All Balls seal resting in place as far as it will go...
Automotive tire Drinkware Cabinetry Fluid Rim


Obviously that's not going to work. No dust cap, no keeper...
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
By the way, all of the peeling paint is because I soaked it in fuel to make certain that I got all of the rubber out from the old seals which had hardened and fused to the sides of the fork.
 

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Unless I have been building my forks wrong, I think you are supposed to have all your internal fork parts installed before you put your seals and fork seal locks in place. When you disassemble you loosen that screw on the bottom of the fork tube, remove the dust cover, the seal lock, ring or whatever you call it, and basically slide hammer all of the seals out with the fork tube. Your procedure looks like a first for me.
 

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1994 Yamaha TW200, 1989 TDub Basketcase, 1971 Honda CT90 (x2), 1983 Honda CT110
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Unless I have been building my forks wrong, I think you are supposed to have all your internal fork parts installed before you put your seals and fork seal locks in place. When you disassemble you loosen that screw on the bottom of the fork tube, remove the dust cover, the seal lock, ring or whatever you call it, and basically slide hammer all of the seals out with the fork tube. Your procedure looks like a first for me.

Thanks Ken. Over the last two weeks I've watched likely 8-10 youtube videos explaining how to do it and every one has a little twist to how they do it. Regardless, I can't get the seal low enough to install both the dust cover and the locking ring.
 
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