TW200 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,704 Posts
Kill switch, then key. If you ever drop that bike in gear and need it to stop spinning quickly, you will be better off if your instinct is to hit that kill switch, at your right hand. In your garage you can use the key, but when you are lying on the ground with a hot muffler on your leg, the kill switch is faster and more instinctive (if you have practiced it). JMHO. Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Having watched someone pinned under a 4 wheeler with the throttle pegged open and unable to find the kill switch so we could help him I'll add a +1 to use the kill switch.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Turn the gas off, let the carb run dry, turn the key off when the engine quits. That's my normal procedure.

Any way possible when the bike goes over, but I usually never give up and make some awesome saves, or at least get the clutch in and bike up before the engine quits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Why do you let the carb run dry?
I do the same thing

Reason I do it is less chance for fuel to go stale and build up gum/varnish inside the carb, plus if it's dry and I've got old fuel in the tank(and know it's been sitting) when I add good fuel to it it'll be better mixed when I turn the valve on and the fuel runs into the carb


But I also try to add sea foam or stabil to the 2- 5 gallon cans I use most of the time... They get used for the lawnmower, generators, samurai, Atv, TW .... Anything that might for whatever reason sit for a long time... Call it proactive laziness... I don't want to tear anything apart later to clean up a carb when I need something the most


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,500 Posts
So far in my short ownership I have used the kill switch only 2 times....more often than not, I just turn the key....so far, so good! But then again, I have not dropped it{yet} and usually only turn it off in the garage or driveway..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,500 Posts
Ok that makes sense. Right now I'm using it more than my car. In my Sportster I try to run the gas tank down so that the next time I run it I'll be using mostly fresh gas. When I run it I usually run a few tanks through it on long rides and then it could sit a month or more. 12 year old bike could probably use some sea foam run through it now and then. I'd already planned on starting to use sea foam on all my rides. Thanks fur da info mate.
Speaking of Sea Foam, what's a good mix? Does it depend on how old the gas or bike is? I know what the directions say, but last weekend I put about 1/3 can in my 2 stroke mix for my chain saw....smoked like a son of a bitch for awhile...:eek: But once that sucker got cranking...the Sea Foam worked great...think I put 2 much in, but the results were not bad....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,367 Posts
Speaking of Sea Foam, what's a good mix? Does it depend on how old the gas or bike is? I know what the directions say, but last weekend I put about 1/3 can in my 2 stroke mix for my chain saw....smoked like a son of a bitch for awhile... But once that sucker got cranking...the Sea Foam worked great...think I put 2 much in, but the results were not bad....
Yeah, I just eyeball it. Subconsciously I'm sure the dose gets bigger the crappier something is running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,376 Posts
I got in the habit of using the key for two reasons:
1) I would accidentally hit the starter button making embarrassing "your an idiot" grinding noises.
2) I would accidentally forget that kill switch was in "off" position upon start up again thus making embarrassing silent noises.
Granted if I only learned proper technique and built instictual response then problems in 1) &2) would not occur.
I know carb draining is preferable but since it takes awhile to spend fuel accumulated in lines, filter and float bowl I often delude myself by thinking I shall ride again before fuel sours in carb. This last winter I drained and put bike away for season 5 or 6 times only to have no-snow mild weather have me drag beast out again for another ride. I do drain carb occasionally and easily because I Dremeled slots in JIM drain screw head so that most blade and phillips drivers will loosen drain screw ( no more hunting for the one JIM screwdriver hiding in bottom of toolbox).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Why do you let the carb run dry?
With my job I don't know whether I'll ride again tomorrow or next year.

I use the kickstand.
I do, too--pull into a parking place, kick the stand down while doing a 180, and foot back on the peg as Tdub eases to a stop and comes gently to rest on the side stand, never touching a foot to ground. Gets attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,312 Posts
I do, too--pull into a parking place, kick the stand down while doing a 180, and foot back on the peg as Tdub eases to a stop and comes gently to rest on the side stand, never touching a foot to ground. Gets attention.
Video please!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
One of the other bikes I take pride in is a 1974 BMW R90S. Back then we were just getting used to gizmos like electric starters. In my life I have never had such a awkward positioned key, kill switch, starter button stands and choke!
The key is on the side of the headlight inside the fairing. The starter button is on the throttle side and the kill switch also on the throttle side. The carbs require a choke which is on the engine on the left side
The drill is to use both hands on the right bar for starting and after it is running the left hand goes down to close the choke
For shut down - kill switch with my right thumb, then a long stretch with my left arm to the key and finally a balancing act onto the side stand in gear so it will not roll forwards or backwards and once off - a good lift and grunt to put her up on the center stand.
Give me a modern bike on a side stand any day!
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top