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Discussion Starter #1
I've been actively searching for a Tw-200, to the point of making a deal on one but fell through when the owner wouldn't take a cashiers check drawn on a bank just a few blocks from his house and I was willing to go to the bank with him so he could cash the check. He wanted cash and I backed out of the deal, there had to be a reason he didn't want a paper trail on the sale. Well some things have come up, I bought a new home and relocated halfway across the country so kind of stopped the search until my old home is sold and will be missing most of this hunting season.

The Tw 200 was to be used for coyote hunting, traveling out from base camp. My concerns about the Tw-200 was long rides on pavement to reach hunting areas and the small fuel capacity, I was going to go with spare fuel containers to supplement.

My dilemma, since my initial search for a mechanical mule to hunt off of I've come across the RE Himalaya, a little heavier, same fuel economy, more hiway friendly, larger fuel capacity and more than capable to run dirt roads and two tracts(most of the land I hunt vehicles can't be taken off existing/established roads although many are in very rough shape) and is fitted with accessories I'd have to add on the Tw..

What am I seeing that might be a mistake going with the RE (I have a dealer in the adjacent town).

Thanks
AWS
 

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Just sacrificing reliability and some off road performance. The pluses might be worth it for you, only you can say. That RE is a good looking steed for sure.

Concerning your TW purchase that fell through, there are a lot of guys who will only accept cash, and it’s hard to blame them with so many scams going on. If you’re going to seriously shop for a TW, you pretty much need to have the cash on hand, ready to jump at a good deal. Good luck!
 

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why didn't you go with cash in your pocket? In no way am I saying you were trying to scam the seller, but I can't fault anyone for wanting only cash.
 

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Royal Enfield (new era) have a good rep and the moto-mags have been kind to them. And RE is buying Ducati, not that it really matters, except maybe to demonstrate how serious they are in being a major player in moto-world.
That said, I doubt if anything would match the TW for stone-ax reliability & toughness...and there are a LOT more dealers & larger aftermarket.
Just out of curiosity, why do you hunt coyotes?
 

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What a neat bike...my only concerns would be access to a dealer for potential warranty problems....cost ??…..but the deal breaker for me would be the weight....at about 430 pounds ...that would be to much for a old fart like me to handle …..the TW at 280 is to much for me, but I try to stay upright ...
 

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I was about to buy an RE Himalayan,but after I found out that ther early ones had many,many reliability issues I changed my mind.
It also seems than even Royal Enfield doesn't trust Himalayan if you read the service schedule.
The following need to be REPLACED(Copied from official owner manual):
Rubber hose, Inlet manifold every 6200 miles
Oil cooler inlet & outlet pipes every 9300 miles
Seal Ring every 9300 miles
Accelerator Cable every 6200 miles
Rubber Hose, Air fitler to Throttle body every 6200 miles
PAV pipes & Hose clip every 15500 miles
Clutch cable every 6200 miles
Fuel Pipe every 6200 miles
Rear Suspension Linkage every 9300 miles
Rear wheel cush drive rubbers every 6200 miles
and more......
 

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I agree no cash, no bike. NO I'm not going to your bank to get the cash YOU should have just brought in the first place. You'll be signing a paper saying bought "as is where is, no warranty implied". The paper trail does what??
 

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I don't mind buying or selling for cash..... but I will only do it at bank or a dealership....if I am dealing with a individual I do not know for a substantial amount of money....

I want to be in a safe and neutral environment..... where buyer and seller witness a employee of the bank count the money …...and witnesses the exchange of the money , the keys, the vehicle with the correct vin... and the clear matching title...... and no one leaves once the transaction has started till it is done....

I have done that dozens of times with absolutely no problems...better safe than sorry,

The paper trail will prove ownership when you (or the dealer) transfer the title and license and register the vehicle. You will need to prove when the sale was made, the purchase price, any sales tax, a mileage statement....a bill of sale or proof of sale etc..if you insure it, they will also want the paper trail...

If you have a transaction of more than $10,000 the bank is required to report that under the Bank Secrecy act...a law intended to prevent money laundering.

Say you have a transaction of $75, 000...... you may get a visit or a letter asking you to explain where you got the money and what you did with it.. in that case...a paper trail will save you a lot of time and trouble .
 

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Cash is king, and yes, scams are out there with fraudulent cashier checks. For lower value (say, maybe $2500 or less) transactions I don't mind cash trading hands in someone's driveway. For higher value, I've done it in cash but generally prefer to do it at a neutral location (i.e bank). This assures both parties protection against fraud, bill of sales can easily be notarized which a lot of states require anyway, and if the buyer is taking a loan (or seller has a loan and thus lien on the title), those issues can be addressed all in one go. It's really quite painless. Way better option than handing a seller cash with a "pinky promise" they'll use that money to pay off the loan, get the lien release letter, and mail it to you in a few weeks instead of spending it all on hookers and blow.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The seller had a signed second party title, it wasn't in his name and his adult son was showing the bike and agreed to a cashiers check. When I showed up with the cashiers check drawn on HIS bank he wouldn't except it, not even when I offered to go to HIS bank so he could cash it. Sorry I don't walk in to a strangers home with thousands of dollars of cash, I don't care how good a deal it was.

I hunt coyotes for pelts and I do ADC work for ranchers.
 

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The seller had a signed second party title, it wasn't in his name
Be very careful in cases like that. It's often because the current seller just bought the bike to "flip" and did not want to deal with the expense and time to transfer the title. Nothing wrong with that per se (although technically it's tax evasion from DMV's perspective), but as state DMV systems trundle into the 21st century and go automated, they are taking measures to prevent this. In Texas at least, as a seller you can electronically notify DMV that you have sold the vehicle, and optionally input who the buyer was. This protects you if the vehicle is involved in an accident, crime, or racks up a bunch of charges on toll roads. What it also does is start a 30 day clock. Legally the new owner has to transfer the title to their name within 30 days. If they don't, on the 31st day, and every 30 days thereafter, a $25 penalty is "attached" to the title. Not every state currently has this, but it's worth checking if yours does.

So how people get screwed is say Jimbob sells his bike to Cletus. Jimbob reports the sale to DMV. Cletus doesn't feel like paying the ~$200 or so of tax and transfer fees, so keeps the title with Jimbob's signature, but leaves the buyer blank and squirrels it away. Cletus rides the bike for the next couple years. The leftover registration expires, but who cares. 3 years later Cletus goes to sell the bike. "Clean Title!" Now Joe comes to buy the bike, and doesn't realize the name on the title doesn't match Cletus'. In some cases Cletus may even pretend to be the titled owner. Joe buys the bike and goes to the title office to transfer it to his name. The clerk then says it'll cost $1100 to register the bike. What? Oh, well the normal $200 of sales tax and fees, plus $900 of penalties the title has incurred on the past 3 years. Joe is screwed here. As much as you'd think Cletus should be responsible for the penalty since he was the scofflaw, ultimately Cletus "never existed". If Joe wants to legally own the bike, he's gotta pay the fee. If he signed his name on the title, he's also locked in- can't try to resell the bike and pass the problem onto someone else.

So moral of the story- always ask to see the other party's ID and ensure it matches the title. Now and then I'll get someone who refuses, or shows it and it doesn't match (oh, but that's my buddy, I know he didn't report the sale, blah blah blah). Another red flag is if the registration is long expired, since to renew it they'd have to transfer it.

To me it's kind of a broken system, because the person breaking the law isn't affected by it, it's an unsuspecting buyer who was trying to follow the rules gets slapped with the penalty. The only way Cletus can get tagged with it is if he gets pulled over on it, cited for an unregistered bike, and then is required to court to go register it.
 

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I watched a program where 2 Canadian brothers rode RE Himalayans around the circumference of India. One bike seemed to be ok, but the other had a bit of trouble and appeared to be not as durable after rough riding conditions and a couple spills. My opinion, not impressed.
 

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127 kg (279 lb) (wet) Tw200

194kg
(427.697) (dry) RE Himalayan

Too heavy for what you want to use it for. TW maybe slow but is very nimble.I have no problem riding my TW 30+ miles to access the dirt. ie: Arlington to Darrington on HWY 530 /50-60mph
 

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"Gen:27:3"...I looked it up.
??
 

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"Gen:27:3"...I looked it up.
??

I'm a bow hunter:)

"Now then get your weapons... and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me" Gen 27:3
 
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if youbwant something street legal and worth hunting from you wont do better than the tw. if you only want for offroad the Honda fat cat has many many many advantages over the tw. do you eat the coyote you hunt?

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I have eaten coyote and I would be pretty desperate to make it part of my regular diet(they taste just like they smell). I do enjoy raccoon(roasted like a turkey), muskrats(stewed with dumplings), beaver(jerky, stew, just about anyway you would prepare beef and the liver fried with onions), and bobcat (in a few different stir fried dishes)

Thanks guys I think I am swaying back to the TW. I guess something different caught my eye. I'm 72 and in fair shape I can still pick up a Harley dresser by myself when my neighbor drops his in the driveway, he gives me a case of beer each time.
 

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127 kg (279 lb) (wet) Tw200

194kg
(427.697) (dry) RE Himalayan

Too heavy for what you want to use it for. TW maybe slow but is very nimble.I have no problem riding my TW 30+ miles to access the dirt. ie: Arlington to Darrington on HWY 530 /50-60mph
Warning...off thread....is the Mountain Loop Highway safe for a motorcycle.....and the western foothills surrounding Mt Baker...??? Damn, winter has just started and I am anxious to go exploring....
 

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warning...off thread....is the mountain loop highway safe for a motorcycle.....and the western foothills surrounding mt baker...??? Damn, winter has just started and i am anxious to go exploring....
yes:)
 
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