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Two bros and I went to cargo trailer dealer that carries loads of motorcycle carriers so we got to try out several. I am 71 and while still strong enough to ride getting a bike up on some racks are dangerous.

First the MX hauler with the hydraulic jack - the TW footpegs are too far apart for the hold down bolts - carrier sways too much for my comfort and it only goes down to 17" off the ground so you have to list the 290 pound TW up about 6 inches...too much for me

MX hauler with the 6' tray - goes all the way to the ground but wobbles way too much. Also weighs almost 100 pounds with the bike is too much for many rigs

Versahaul - my hitch is 18" of the ground - a two person load is sort of OK but probably not with a wife - one person is crazy and not into having TW on top of me

Tilt a rack still is a two "Man" job for us older guys

Here is a rack that is pretty exciting but not in the USA yet - would you pay $600


Still dont have a rack I can load by myself on my motorhome - ANY IDEAS _ WHAT ARE YOU USING

Cheers'
 

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If it's was an issue for me to load and I had to ride(I do), that makes sense and I would pay it as long as I could get the rack on and off the vehicle myself and it handled the weight ok. Thanks for sharing, I would like first hand review if you get one.. ;)
 

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You could use a lowering hitch with the versahaul and add the front wheel loop chock they have for it. A girl I know does that, very easy to push or power up and park in the chock.
 

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Hitch carriers can be lowered closer to the ground to make loading easier. Change geometry when parking by putting the haul vehicle's front tires higher on terrain or ramps. Lower rear tires by parking in ditch-like depressions is another method as well as parking with higher terrain behind vehicle ( curbing, sidewalk, hill, etc.)
 

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I'm 70 and have been driving my TW's up onto the Versahaul for 8 years now and never lost control. Mine is about 18 inches up too. It takes some finesse with clutch, throttle, and front brake when stepping over the rear arm. I do try to use Fred's ideas whenever possible. You can practice driving up a small hill standing beside the bike and stopping and starting until you get the hand co-ordination practice needed. You will need to stop when stepping over the rear tie-down arm. That is the most awkward part, either pushing or driving, and the most likely place to lose control. That is why I stop, put my left leg over the arm, drive up 2 feet, stop, swing my right leg over the arm, and push to the chock, which doesn't need any power. (Don't forget to turn the ignition off and shut off the gas!!!!:eek: )
 

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Princess Auto (Harbor Freight) $100 special. Did some personal beefing up. Has worked well for four or five years now. The only other problems were establishing the right height. Used a 12 inch step up (or down). And the slop in the reciever and extension. Fixed that with the right thickness of metal to take up the slack. 20181123_114346 (Medium).jpg 20181204_125642 (Medium).jpg

I always power walked it on before. That was from right to left. The new RV has the spare on the left side so i had to walk it on backwards from the right side to have it fit. Had a ledge beside me and the ramp was almost level so a bit of a grunt but not impossible. I guess it's an idiosyncrasy but I have always walked, mounted or handled any bike from the left (looking forward). Need to practice a right side power walk to see if I can even do it.
 

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I tried it in the lowering position first and, altho it made for easy loading, I could see trouble down the road so I nixed that.
 

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I'm kicking around weather to go the Harbor Freight route or the Discount Ramps Black Widow. I'd post links but I don't have enough posts as a new member. They have 2 variants, an aluminum one that looks like the same from HF and a steel version for a little less.
 

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If you get the Harbor Freight model may I recommend a better anti-wobble device? Something like one of these work better to reduce, or eliminate the destructive vibration that causes fatigue fractures in many aluminum alloys. There are a world of these available from under $10 to over $40. Drive a few miles then re-tighten and every few hundred miles thereafter.
s-l225.jpg
 

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I felt the HF supplied anti-wobble device was not that effective for me considering the rough roads I drive on. Similarly the Harbor Freight's steel tube seemed to be a little thin walled and thus lacked enough torsional stiffness for my satisfaction after I cured the primary wobble mentioned with an aftermarket clamp. However steel is nice and springy so not that big an issue, especially if you haul on mostly paved roads.
I assume three point attachments like Motard's do cure the wobble issue though.
I've subsequently gotten hooked on a hydraulic MotoJack carrier but it also benefits from a tight anti-wobble clamp.
 

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This is how I do it...
(till the 2:05 mark)

What's really frustrating is that I have "a system" that works....but every time I'm loading or unloading, I get some well-meaning person think that I'm in danger, and come running over to "help me"..
After thanking them for the offer of help, I have to explain that I've been doing this for years - by myself - and the only time I've ever had a problem, was when someone tried to "help me".
Once they're assured that I can do it solo, I have no problem....although they are nervous wrecks while watching.

YouTube is full of failures....most often caused by ramps that are NOT secured!
 

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Two things in that video that I've seen missed by so many people. First is having a second ramp to walk up. Seems like a no brainer. But lots of people go with the "I'll ride it up" approach. Then when something goes wrong half way up there is no fall back position. Hello gravity, my old friend! The second is securing the ramps to the truck. Maybe not as obvious. But no less important.
 

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I just traded a buddy of mine a blue tooth set for a hitch carrier. His neighbor is an engineer and welder and made it in his garage. Sturdy as hell. Heavy duty but not too heavy. It has a loop for the front tire, TW front tire just fits in, snugly but fits in there. And there is a pin that removes at the front so the ramp tilts toward the ground for easier loading. A small ramp extender locks in and loading is a breeze. I just got my Hi-Tow anti wobble from Amazon this afternoon to shore things up nice and tight while in use. I'm taking my TW to Vegas next month to ride around on while my wife takes a Law Enforcement class at Metro. Thought I'd get in some warm riding in while it's still frozen here at home. Cruise to Red Rock in the morning for Knights practice, then maybe out to Mt. Charleston or Lake Mead or both. Only concern is security when I'm not on it at night at the hotel. I guess a chain and a light post or chain to truck at night. Fully insured but don't want to have to use it. Ya dig.
 
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