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Discussion Starter #1
Got the TW now and the hitch rack for the GW Sprinter van (named Englebert). Works well.
THe TW however needs some suspension help. It is as I got it from the dealer but the front seems very harsh . Checked tire pressure and it is 17-18psi. What can I do to check the forks out? (I always have my KTM forks worked on by a pro but don't want to go there just yet).
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Your forks don't have enough oil in them. Common problem. See here: http://tw200forum.com/forum/technical-write-ups/2786-fork-oil-changing-2.html
Start on post #13.

After you have read all the way through, ignore all of it except for the 130mm oil level. Fix that and ride if for a while. If you are like me and around 180 to 200, that's all you need to do. I did all the rest and still ended up at the 130 mm level. :p

In the dirt, 12 to 14 makes for a better ride, but only good for short distances on the highway. It drops gas mileage about 10 to 15 mpg on pavement.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That tire pressure makes sense for sure. How do you check oil level in forks? I'm assuming on a bike stand with weight off the front end.
Just read the post #13...
Then it is a Cycleracks back rack and hand guards and see how it goes from there... only have 25 or so miles on it so far (and that was around my property).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think I know the problem.

"(I always have my KTM forks worked on by a pro but don't want to go there just yet)."
Yeah sounds like a little wimpy thing to say... 'I get my shocks rebuilt after every ride and change my oil each time we stop for lunch' :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Really, adding oil to the TW shocks is almost a easy as changing the oil in the engine...except for the need to suspend the bike so the front end can fully extend.
I have the hydraulic bike stand so...is it just pulling the fork caps and measuring? And then adding a few ml at a time to get to 130...?

Also how do you remove the right hand mirror? Left hand one came off normally but right one will only turn (with effort) about 1/2 turn either CW or CCW.
 

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1) The recogmended fork oil level needs to be set with springs,spacers etc removed from fork legs and legs collapsed. Most accurately and easily done with fork legs vertical so you don’t have to worry about correcting for the cosine of the angle of the dangle. Other than that you have the right idea, add a bit of oil and re-measure.

2) Right side mirror has reverse threads so that an impact on mirror from branch, etc loosens mirror shaft rather than breaking shaft or perch. As such loosen and remove by turning clockwise rather than counterclockwise.
 

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Oh, yeah, right, you have to fully extend them to get the springs and spacers out then collapse them for the measurement. It's been a while since I did that...like 6 years. I never bothered with getting them vertical, I just slid my dowel down about in the middle of the side of the fork to touch the oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oh, yeah, right, you have to fully extend them to get the springs and spacers out then collapse them for the measurement. It's been a while since I did that...like 6 years. I never bothered with getting them vertical, I just slid my dowel down about in the middle of the side of the fork to touch the oil.
It's been about 15 years since I had some forks apart and realized that I probably would F' something up if I tried to do anything to modify them. I used a local guy who works out of his garage and knows off-road racing suspension set ups well.
Not expecting miracles yet on the TW as I'm tall and lanky so standing up to ride rough stuff is hard (I even have a tall seat on my KTM to make it less distance/effort to go from sit to stand).
Love the little bike so far though - does just what I bought it for. Being a tinkerer though...
 

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You are not taking the forks apart, merely removing the top caps, springs and spacers, adding a little oil and putting it back together. It's easier than changing a tire. Oh, and loosen the top pinch bolts a bit first, it makes unscrewing the top caps easier. Don't forget to re-torque them!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You are not taking the forks apart, merely removing the top caps, springs and spacers, adding a little oil and putting it back together. It's easier than changing a tire. Oh, and loosen the top pinch bolts a bit first, it makes unscrewing the top caps easier. Don't forget to re-torque them!!!
Hailey Idaho near Salmon and the Sawridge (?) mountains..? We rode somewhere there, on some really gnarly goat trail single track a few years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Sawtooth. Yup, we got lots of gnarly single track!
We joined up with a big group ride there. Stayed in a place that had cabins, Tee Pees, coffee shop etc. Back in 2001 I think.
I had a KDX220 and a guy that worked for me had a WR250. Rode from one valley over to the next valley to the west and back.
I think A lot of guys were not expecting how technical the riding was. One guy from California had a Canondale 4 stroke.
One guy lost some toes riding on single track with tall grass and rocks hiding in there. ''keep your toes up" was the lesson there. They could of sown them back on but apparently his fellow riders didn't realize that the toes were ripped off and laying back beside the trail.
Another rider, on a RM250 2 stroke MX bike, had such a rough time in the technical sections and swore that he would never eat f'n Idaho potatoes again.
Great ride and beautiful too.
 

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....One guy lost some toes riding on single track with tall grass and rocks hiding in there......
Ouch!! :eek: We grow rocks in the sagebrush along the single track just lurking for inattentive riders....I've bashed mine more than once, but my heavy MX boots saved my foot. I did, however, hit one that bounced my front tire off the trail and I went 10 feet downhill over the handlebars....I was real lucky not to get hurt, but it took an hour to get the T-dub back up on the trail by myself. :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ouch!! :eek: We grow rocks in the sagebrush along the single track just lurking for inattentive riders....I've bashed mine more than once, but my heavy MX boots saved my foot. I did, however, hit one that bounced my front tire off the trail and I went 10 feet downhill over the handlebars....I was real lucky not to get hurt, but it took an hour to get the T-dub back up on the trail by myself. :mad:
This guy had work boots on and the rock tore the leather open - seeing that it was bleeding profusely the helpers stuffed the hole with some cloth and got him to the hospital asap.
I had a similar incident when working for my brother in California (we are originally from England but emigrated to Canada in '66). He had a shop the did high performance Porsche work, specializing in Chevy V8 conversions. I was working on a 914 wiring the electric fan in the front 'boot' (and talking a customer at the same time) when one of fingers hit the back of the fan and since it was wired in reverse it chopped instead smacking.
I got a high speed ride in a Porsche ambulance to a clinic in Whittier and there they asked "where is the rest of the finger"...
The Porsche ambulance returned with part of the digit that had been cut and thrown over on to the fender well.
All turned out ok except that finger is a bit curved at the end and I can't play some chords on the guitar the same. That was probably in the late 1980's.
 
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