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Not to be to nosey ****, but how much, after you restarted in September, did that set you back $$ If you don't mind me asking...:eek:
 

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Respect! You do it agin I will ride the state of Nebraska with you & knowing this group you would probably have someone with you the entire ride.
What a cool thing to do. If anyone does this again let us know before you start & you will probably not have to pay for a hotel or meal the entire trip.
 

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How incredible! Thanks for documenting so much of your ride for us to feel like we lived through part of your experience. You're an inspiration to us all!

I would love to know what happened to the bike in Nebraska that caused you to take it to the dealer for repairs? I didn't see in the blog where you related what malfunctioned.

Thanks again!
 

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With an adventure of that magnitude you should be graduated to senior member.

Hats off!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
So I had two breakdowns during the trip. I knew you guys would be especially interested in those. I am not sure of the cause of either.

The first one happened in Tennessee. I had changed the oil in Maryland, four days before the breakdown. I used a motorcycle specific synthetic oil. I can't remember the brand. Probably Mobil 1 synthetic 10 W 40. I have used a similar synthetic in my FJR forever with no problems. My FJR has never used any oil. I rode the TW at least 2500 miles around my home in the several months before I left on the trip, and it did not use oil during that time. But I admit that I did not check the oil during those first four days of hard riding, which was a big mistake. After the engine died on me, it was definitely low on oil, which surprised me.

My assumption is that it got low on oil and the piston blew because of that. But I don't actually know. I had it repaired in Lexington, Kentucky, and that repairman did not speculate to me about what caused the problem. I assume it was low on oil, reason enough. I learned a big lesson from this and checked the oil faithfully every day after that bad experience.

I changed the oil again in Oklahoma, at my mother-in-law's house. That time I used YamaLube because there was a dealer a couple of blocks away. They had put on new sprockets and installed the x-ring chain I had bought elsewhere. At that time, I carefully adjusted the intake and exhaust valves myself to make sure they were in spec.

The second problem occurred in Nebraska. The intake valve broke off! I had changed the oil again in Nampa, Idaho, five days before the second breakdown. I used motorcycle specific synthetic oil again. I think it was the Mobil 1 synthetic again. I bought it at Wal-Mart. Similar to what I have used on the FJR.

The repairman asked when I had changed the oil, and said that the oil looked thick and low. I told him it had only been a few days. I thought that synthetic oil should not have looked "thick." But I had noticed that on the 37 degree mornings when I checked the oil, it took a while for the oil to show up in the sight glass, but it did not look black like used oil does. I just attributed that to the cold and waited until it showed up.It was between the lines always. It was between the lines the morning I left, and I checked it again immediately after the engine died, and it was still at level. So I don't think it was low on oil this time. And I always let the bike warm up well before riding.

The repairman also said it looked like it had been running lean. Now this is likely my fault. I did try to adjust the fuel mixture on the carburetor when I was in high elevations. And it's true that I really didn't know what I was doing there. It started running poorly with low power at higher elevations so I adjusted the carb mixture to be more lean. I thought that made sense. I did this in Colorado. I would adjust the mixture, then ride a while and see if I thought it felt like it had more power. It seemed to me that it ran better at elevation (between 5,000 and 10,000 feet) with about 1 1/2 turns on the fuel mixture, so I ran it that way when over 5,000 feet. When I returned, I changed the mixture back to the 2 1/2 turns I have read so much about on this forum. I did change the fuel mixture back to 2 1/2 turns as soon as I got below 5,000 feet, which would have been a couple days before I had the problem this time.

My best guess is that changing the fuel mixture at all was a big mistake on my part. I have since read online a bit and it seems that the proper thing to do is change the jets at elevation. I didn't know to do that. I just fiddled with the fuel mixture until I thought it had more power. It seemed like it did to me. But I am now thinking that I ran it too lean and that caused the problem.

But in the end, the repairman shook his head and said he didn't know for sure what caused the problem. The repairman replaced the intake valve parts and also replaced the piston and bored it out. So on the trip I had two pistons and the necessary boring to make them fit. And I can't say for sure what happened either time. I'm pretty sure the first time it was low on oil, but the bike did not have a history of using oil. Both times were 4 or 5 days after I changed the oil using synthetic oil. I can't imagine that that was a problem. I have read here that many of you use synthetic oil but I am thinking I should stick with regular oil in the future. I've had back luck twice with synthetic.

So that's what I know about my breakdowns, and I admit I am no mechanic. I'm just an old guy doing his best to figure out this little engine. The breakdowns were disappointing and unfortunate, but I made it across country and back.

Thanks for your interest in my trip.
 

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That can really put a damper on a good ride. I have a 2015 TW in the garage that I have not even put on the road yet and was going to sell my 99 with 32,000 kms but I'm starting to think I should keep it for a back up as the only problem I have ever had is a leaking clutch cover gasket. I use cheap Castrol 10W40 motorcycle oil by the way. Castrol Grand Prix Motorcycle - Four Stroke | Canadian Tire
 

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Wow, I just finished reading your adventure. That is a lot of miles. I can't believe you rode it all on knobbies. I rode only 100 miles on the street and I tingled head to toe from the vibration from knobbies. I too, salute you for such a great accomplishment. This confirms that you are TW Crazy. What's up next? Baja 1000?
 

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:D What an awesome read about a great adventure! You Rock!

So, since many of us wanted to do exactly what you did, maybe you could share some things you did to plan the trip and things you learned?
  • Roughly how much did you budget?
  • What gear did you wear (coat/pants/boots/gloves/helmet)?
  • Did you do any camping at all, or just motel stays?
  • Which GPS unit did you have that allowed you to do the live-tracking thing? Was that a SPOT in addition to a TomTom/Magellan/Garmin GPS? Or was it an all-in-one unit?
  • How did you decide on routes once you started going tarmac instead of TAT?
  • If you were to do it again, what would you change?

Hope you don't mind sharing some of your hard-won wisdom now that you have had time to rest a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Thanks, LuvNot, for your interest and your questions. I'll be glad to do my best to answer them:

1) Roughly how much did you budget?

Budget? I just hauled off and did it!

But the cost? That I can talk about. And to answer another question, I did stay in motels, which affected the cost the most. I did that because:
a) I didn't want to haul a tent, sleeping bag, possibly cooking gear and food. It's a small bike; I thought running light was a good idea. It meant that I had to plan to be at a motel and restaurants every day, but that was not hard. It did however mean that I HAD to make a certain number of miles per day. If I were to do as some have said and only make 10 miles in a day on certain TAT sections, I would have been in trouble with no tent.
b) I am an old fart (69 years) and wanted to take a shower and have clean sheets every night.
c) I don't have kids in college, I don't have a mortgage on my house, I don't have payments on my car, truck or motorcycles. So I could afford to do it.
I have not done an exact calculation, but I estimate motels averaged $85-90 per night. I did wind up staying in some ratty places. It's sometimes a crap shoot. And sometimes I was ready for a really nice place after that experience.
So my expenses were roughly the motel, plus gas, plus food. I usually had breakfast at the motel, carried a couple of bottles of 32 oz Gatorade and several bottles of Boost in my milk crate. So I had that for lunch on the road. The Boost provided all the calories that I needed for the day, and was really easy to carry. Then had a pretty good dinner after I found the motel.
Gas prices ran from $2.15 to about $3.75 per gallon depending on how remote the service station was. I got about 60 miles per gallon when going 55 mph, better at slower speeds. Once I went 88 miles and put in one gallon of gas.
A big expense for me was the two major repairs on the bike. I don't know if this is good or bad pricing as I didn't have the option of bidding it out at the time. My first big repair cost $1200, my second $900. I spent about $80 for a dealer to put on new spockets and install the x-ring chain I already had. I bought a new battery in Oklahoma for $35. So what's that? $2,200 - $2,300 for repairs. I would hope nobody else would make the mistakes I did and therefore not have the major repairs. Oh, I put on a new Shinko front tire before the second part of my trip. I think the tire was about $70 and installation $25. So add another hundred there. My back tire now has about 11,000 miles on it and is about ready for replacement.
Oh, and it turns out my speeding ticket in Port Orford cost me $380!!! That stung.

2) What gear did you wear (coat/pants/boots/gloves/helmet)?
I didn't buy anything special. I wore Olympia pants and jacket. Milwaukee boots. A pair of TourMaster warm gloves, but wished I had brought my Gerbing electric gloves. I didn't expect the temps to get so low. I also had a junk pair of summer gloves with the finger-tips out. I just like them. Of course, I mentioned that I have a Gerbing electric jacket liner, which was a life saver. I got my Shuberth C3 Pro helmet when I was at Sturgiss in August (on my Yamaha FJR). I guess it was my luxury item. I thought it was a deal at $500 with the communications kit included. I must admit that I never listened to the radio on the communications set or communicated with anyone else. I like being alone with my thoughts! I had two sets of travel underwear, which I like to call "rechargeable underwear." Almost every night I washed the briefs, long-sleeved T-shirt and smart-wool sock liners out in the sink, rolled them in a towel, mashed that around under my knees, hung them up, and they were dry by the next morning. For warmth, I had a nice pair of lama-wool ski socks that I wore I think every day. I had a set of UnderArmor heat-gear pants and long-sleeved shirt which also helped in the cold. I had boot rain covers, rain pants, and a rain jacket liner. The rain pants and jacket liner were sometimes worn to block the wind for warmth. I think that is about it except for toiletries. Oh, I had a pretty good stock of medicines and bandages in case of emergency. I didn't use any except Ibuprofen, which I took often. I found taking a couple of Ibuprofen at noon helped a great deal with the butt-pain in the afternoon. And I usually took some at night because I was sore all over every day. I do have a nice gel pad that I put on the seat, which made the seat remarkably comfortable. I had all the tools that I knew to fit my bike, and even had tire repair tools, which I was glad to never have to use.

3) Did you do any camping at all, or just motel stays?
As mentioned above, I did no camping. Just motels.

4) Which GPS unit did you have that allowed you to do the live-tracking thing? Was that a SPOT in addition to a TomTom/Magellan/Garmin GPS? Or was it an all-in-one unit?
I decided to spring for the Garmin Inreach system, plus I did navigation using my Samsung 6 Active phone. I paid the ($60) subscription fee to Garmin so that I could have the tracks uploaded every ten minutes, and my wife and others could see exactly where I was any time during the day. That was completely worth it to me since I was traveling alone and the whole issue of having trouble in some remote area was a serious problem. With this I could send texts to my wife by satellite or send SOS signals by satellite. I paid the $18 for a year of insurance through Garmin to cover up to $50,000 of search and rescue expenses, which I thought was an amazing deal. I only used the satellite texts a few times, so I would opt for the lower tier package next time. I had the unlimited plan just in case. After the trip, I suspended the account so that it will only cost the basic $25 per year, and I can activate it again any time I go on a trip.
I was surprised that I wound up doing most of my navigating with the Android cell phone. I had downloaded gpsKevin's tracks on it, and found following those very easy. I think there was only once that the phone did not want to navigate when out of cell phone service area. I had the Garmin Inreach gps as a backup. PLUS I had bought the full set of Sam's paper maps before I left. I used the roll chart for the first few days, but found that entirely too cumbersome and a pain to load the new charts every night. Plus I had too much stuff on my handlebars with the phone and the GPS mounted there. So I wound up taking the roll chart case off. I decided to follow the blue line on my phone and use the paper maps in my tank bag for back-up. And I never had to use the paper maps.
I had rigged a charger cord for the phone to the bike battery. The Garmin Inreach did not need charging during the day. I think it would run three days without a charge, but I charged it every night at the motel.

5) How did you decide on routes once you started going tarmac instead of TAT?
I was in Utah when I finally gave up on the TAT altogether. I had "cherry-picked" it up to that point. I rode much of it in every state until then, but I had done some tarmac in almost every state as well.
Mostly, I used Google maps with the option to avoid freeways to plot routes to the major towns the TAT went through anyway. I would have roughly taken gpsKevin's route through Nevada, but when I tried to make motel reservations, I found that there was no vacancies along that route. There were only small towns with few motels in those places. AND Nevada is very remote, even on pavement. So I decided to go north early and went through the Salt Lake City area because I knew I could find vacant motels there. Unless my target city was in a larger metropolitan area, I usually made a reservation for that night's motel. I didn't want to arrive after a hard days ride only to find no vacancies and have to ride further into the night to find a place to stay.

6)If you were to do it again, what would you change?

A) I would have someone with me! That would make everything more fun, much easier and less scary. But I didn't have anyone who could go, so it was Don't go or Go alone. I'm old. I won't have many chances. I decided to go alone. But I DID have some back-up plans through the Garmin Inreach, and I had AAA. I guess most of all, I had luck. Both times I had a breakdown, someone helped me within five minutes of the breakdown. It could easily have been SO MUCH WORSE. I went through a lot of really remote areas. I am very grateful.

B) I am not an off-road guy. Though I have ridden about 90,000 miles by motorcycle since I began in 2003, I had virtually no experience at off road riding. If I had it to do over, I would take an off-road course before attempting the TAT. Most of what I rode was pretty easy gravel roads, but I kept getting into some really tough situations on remote mountains. They were not undoable for me, but they were uncomfortable for me, especially being alone. And because I am such a beginner, those sections really took me a long time. In fact, I thought this was funny: Google maps kept track of where I went the whole time. It's a standard feature of Google maps. When I got home and looked back through each day's record, Google assumed that I was riding a bicycle when I was on the most of the off-road sections! That's how slow I was going! I think a weekend course in off road riding would have been very helpful to me.

Yeah, I think if I had someone with me I could have done the whole TAT. I would have to carry a tent and sleeping bag because I doubt I would have been able to make enough speed to get to the motel cities. But I'm Okay with what I did. It's enough for me. At my age, I think I'll just stick to being a pavement guy. It was adventure enough for me. I am satisfied with it. I am proud of it. I feel good about it, and will enjoy reflecting back on it the rest of my life. Thanks for your interest.
 

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And you should be very proud of yourself. Fantastic trip and write up. :)
Thanks, LuvNot, for your interest and your questions. I'll be glad to do my best to answer them:

1) Roughly how much did you budget?

Budget? I just hauled off and did it!

But the cost? That I can talk about. And to answer another question, I did stay in motels, which affected the cost the most. I did that because:
a) I didn't want to haul a tent, sleeping bag, possibly cooking gear and food. It's a small bike; I thought running light was a good idea. It meant that I had to plan to be at a motel and restaurants every day, but that was not hard. It did however mean that I HAD to make a certain number of miles per day. If I were to do as some have said and only make 10 miles in a day on certain TAT sections, I would have been in trouble with no tent.
b) I am an old fart (69 years) and wanted to take a shower and have clean sheets every night.
c) I don't have kids in college, I don't have a mortgage on my house, I don't have payments on my car, truck or motorcycles. So I could afford to do it.
I have not done an exact calculation, but I estimate motels averaged $85-90 per night. I did wind up staying in some ratty places. It's sometimes a crap shoot. And sometimes I was ready for a really nice place after that experience.
So my expenses were roughly the motel, plus gas, plus food. I usually had breakfast at the motel, carried a couple of bottles of 32 oz Gatorade and several bottles of Boost in my milk crate. So I had that for lunch on the road. The Boost provided all the calories that I needed for the day, and was really easy to carry. Then had a pretty good dinner after I found the motel.
Gas prices ran from $2.15 to about $3.75 per gallon depending on how remote the service station was. I got about 60 miles per gallon when going 55 mph, better at slower speeds. Once I went 88 miles and put in one gallon of gas.
A big expense for me was the two major repairs on the bike. I don't know if this is good or bad pricing as I didn't have the option of bidding it out at the time. My first big repair cost $1200, my second $900. I spent about $80 for a dealer to put on new spockets and install the x-ring chain I already had. I bought a new battery in Oklahoma for $35. So what's that? $2,200 - $2,300 for repairs. I would hope nobody else would make the mistakes I did and therefore not have the major repairs. Oh, I put on a new Shinko front tire before the second part of my trip. I think the tire was about $70 and installation $25. So add another hundred there. My back tire now has about 11,000 miles on it and is about ready for replacement.
Oh, and it turns out my speeding ticket in Port Orford cost me $380!!! That stung.

2) What gear did you wear (coat/pants/boots/gloves/helmet)?
I didn't buy anything special. I wore Olympia pants and jacket. Milwaukee boots. A pair of TourMaster warm gloves, but wished I had brought my Gerbing electric gloves. I didn't expect the temps to get so low. I also had a junk pair of summer gloves with the finger-tips out. I just like them. Of course, I mentioned that I have a Gerbing electric jacket liner, which was a life saver. I got my Shuberth C3 Pro helmet when I was at Sturgiss in August (on my Yamaha FJR). I guess it was my luxury item. I thought it was a deal at $500 with the communications kit included. I must admit that I never listened to the radio on the communications set or communicated with anyone else. I like being alone with my thoughts! I had two sets of travel underwear, which I like to call "rechargeable underwear." Almost every night I washed the briefs, long-sleeved T-shirt and smart-wool sock liners out in the sink, rolled them in a towel, mashed that around under my knees, hung them up, and they were dry by the next morning. For warmth, I had a nice pair of lama-wool ski socks that I wore I think every day. I had a set of UnderArmor heat-gear pants and long-sleeved shirt which also helped in the cold. I had boot rain covers, rain pants, and a rain jacket liner. The rain pants and jacket liner were sometimes worn to block the wind for warmth. I think that is about it except for toiletries. Oh, I had a pretty good stock of medicines and bandages in case of emergency. I didn't use any except Ibuprofen, which I took often. I found taking a couple of Ibuprofen at noon helped a great deal with the butt-pain in the afternoon. And I usually took some at night because I was sore all over every day. I do have a nice gel pad that I put on the seat, which made the seat remarkably comfortable. I had all the tools that I knew to fit my bike, and even had tire repair tools, which I was glad to never have to use.

3) Did you do any camping at all, or just motel stays?
As mentioned above, I did no camping. Just motels.

4) Which GPS unit did you have that allowed you to do the live-tracking thing? Was that a SPOT in addition to a TomTom/Magellan/Garmin GPS? Or was it an all-in-one unit?
I decided to spring for the Garmin Inreach system, plus I did navigation using my Samsung 6 Active phone. I paid the ($60) subscription fee to Garmin so that I could have the tracks uploaded every ten minutes, and my wife and others could see exactly where I was any time during the day. That was completely worth it to me since I was traveling alone and the whole issue of having trouble in some remote area was a serious problem. With this I could send texts to my wife by satellite or send SOS signals by satellite. I paid the $18 for a year of insurance through Garmin to cover up to $50,000 of search and rescue expenses, which I thought was an amazing deal. I only used the satellite texts a few times, so I would opt for the lower tier package next time. I had the unlimited plan just in case. After the trip, I suspended the account so that it will only cost the basic $25 per year, and I can activate it again any time I go on a trip.
I was surprised that I wound up doing most of my navigating with the Android cell phone. I had downloaded gpsKevin's tracks on it, and found following those very easy. I think there was only once that the phone did not want to navigate when out of cell phone service area. I had the Garmin Inreach gps as a backup. PLUS I had bought the full set of Sam's paper maps before I left. I used the roll chart for the first few days, but found that entirely too cumbersome and a pain to load the new charts every night. Plus I had too much stuff on my handlebars with the phone and the GPS mounted there. So I wound up taking the roll chart case off. I decided to follow the blue line on my phone and use the paper maps in my tank bag for back-up. And I never had to use the paper maps.
I had rigged a charger cord for the phone to the bike battery. The Garmin Inreach did not need charging during the day. I think it would run three days without a charge, but I charged it every night at the motel.

5) How did you decide on routes once you started going tarmac instead of TAT?
I was in Utah when I finally gave up on the TAT altogether. I had "cherry-picked" it up to that point. I rode much of it in every state until then, but I had done some tarmac in almost every state as well.
Mostly, I used Google maps with the option to avoid freeways to plot routes to the major towns the TAT went through anyway. I would have roughly taken gpsKevin's route through Nevada, but when I tried to make motel reservations, I found that there was no vacancies along that route. There were only small towns with few motels in those places. AND Nevada is very remote, even on pavement. So I decided to go north early and went through the Salt Lake City area because I knew I could find vacant motels there. Unless my target city was in a larger metropolitan area, I usually made a reservation for that night's motel. I didn't want to arrive after a hard days ride only to find no vacancies and have to ride further into the night to find a place to stay.

6)If you were to do it again, what would you change?

A) I would have someone with me! That would make everything more fun, much easier and less scary. But I didn't have anyone who could go, so it was Don't go or Go alone. I'm old. I won't have many chances. I decided to go alone. But I DID have some back-up plans through the Garmin Inreach, and I had AAA. I guess most of all, I had luck. Both times I had a breakdown, someone helped me within five minutes of the breakdown. It could easily have been SO MUCH WORSE. I went through a lot of really remote areas. I am very grateful.

B) I am not an off-road guy. Though I have ridden about 90,000 miles by motorcycle since I began in 2003, I had virtually no experience at off road riding. If I had it to do over, I would take an off-road course before attempting the TAT. Most of what I rode was pretty easy gravel roads, but I kept getting into some really tough situations on remote mountains. They were not undoable for me, but they were uncomfortable for me, especially being alone. And because I am such a beginner, those sections really took me a long time. In fact, I thought this was funny: Google maps kept track of where I went the whole time. It's a standard feature of Google maps. When I got home and looked back through each day's record, Google assumed that I was riding a bicycle when I was on the most of the off-road sections! That's how slow I was going! I think a weekend course in off road riding would have been very helpful to me.

Yeah, I think if I had someone with me I could have done the whole TAT. I would have to carry a tent and sleeping bag because I doubt I would have been able to make enough speed to get to the motel cities. But I'm Okay with what I did. It's enough for me. At my age, I think I'll just stick to being a pavement guy. It was adventure enough for me. I am satisfied with it. I am proud of it. I feel good about it, and will enjoy reflecting back on it the rest of my life. Thanks for your interest.
 

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WOW!! Just read through the blog! What a trip & story! Thoroughly enjoyed the read!

I sure hope to do this TAT trip someday. Hopefully sooner than later!
 

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I too enjoyed and was inspired by the blog. Way to go Mickey!
 

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What a fantastic adventure to say the least! I love that you traveled the Heartlands of America I always enjoy when I can take the Ol Route 66 from Arizona to New Jersey etc it's amazing to see the industrial and agricultural core that is America.
I am also skeptical of synthetics in small engines even though in theory it is far superior I think my TW and my Honda eu series generators will get plain old 30 weight
Thanks for sharing and please remember anything TW is welcome here regardless of your experience we all gain experiences together!
 

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Wow! You are a Biker now. Sorry to hear of mechanical issues in spite of preparation. I doubt adjustingyour idle mixture screw did much damage to engine. I am suspect of synthetics in air cooled units, thin stuff makes it past rings somehow in high heat scenes in my experience. This lowers oil level and leans out the fuel mixture with incombustibles.
The second possible failure mode is darn ethanol fuel. Though it burns okay, etoh putts out less power per volume than gasoline. Thus the mixture needs to be richened up to run properly. Even then, more heat will be generated due to inefficiency. Extra heat fine if your motor designed for extra cooling ala water cooled.
Back in the day, folks found that running a VW on Alcohol was a complete nonstarter. The feeling being that air cooling was just incompatible with alcohol fuels.
So between heat and poor oiling it’s amazing you didn’t break down more. Sad but the TW has poor recent history of failure long term useage. Just not designed for modern times.
How to correct this issue?
1) Don’t use ethanol
2) enrichen your main jet/fueling
3) add an oil cooler
4) make sure oils are not only for motorcycles but for Air Cooled units with wet clutches.
5) I’ve had some success changing carb to larger throat(more cooling air) and easy swap main jets/needles. But not really satisfactory. Too much work.
This is the main reason I’ve gone with the Suzuki Van Van as my fun wee bike. I’d rather ride than try and re engineer my beloved TW. VV has no fueling issues and comes with a oil cooler stock. I spent my life fixing, now Daze I wish spend time riding. My TWs are still all working but on Farms. They like that.
 
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vanvan is the best bang for the buck I've ever seen I wonder if they are seeing a covid price jump like TW's or if they are still unknown I need to watch the vanvan market again
 
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