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Hi all,

I'm putting together a survival/evacuation plan for if and when a big natural/man-made disaster strikes. Concerns for my current location are earthquakes and fires. My bf and I would leave town on our bikes (mine a TW). Traffic is a gridlock here on any average day - I can't imagine what it'd be like in an actual disaster... Hence the choice for bikes instead of the car.

My goal is to be able to execute the packing process within 1 hour. There's already a great thread on building adventure-ready TWs, which I am in the process on doing anyway, and I think this will overlap with that a bit in terms of bike set-up.

Has anyone made a plan like this? Any ideas? These are the major categories I am building my list around. I will design a bike set up after the list is finalized.

- TW tools and maintenance (include basic toolkit and maintenance items, such as tire pump, spark plug, of course fuel)
- Survival (first aid kit, fire starter, flash light, wood saw, survival blanket)
- Food/water/stove (multi-fuel stove, including gasoline)
- Shelter (sleeping bags, tent)
- Personal items (cash, clean/dry clothes, toilertries)
- Communication (2-way radios, sat device, 1-way radio)
- Nav (gps)
- Plan (what city do we go to, on what roads, how much gas do we need, etc)

And which items can we keep on one bike, and which items need to be duplicated on both bikes, if we get split up?

Some differences I can think of from going on a planned TW adventures:
- My home may be destroyed/pilfered when I return, so I need to take items of high value or importance (e.g. title)
- Increased safety threat from thieves. I don't currently own a gun.
- I don't know how long I'll be on the road for.
- Road conditions immediate to disaster area cannot be predicted.

I'm interested to hear any emergency evacuations plans that any of you may have come up with.
 

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Buy a good handgun. No need to get crazy on gun or cost. $3-400 will get a good one. Get training. Conceal carry permits in Cali? Get one if you can, but take it either way. How does bf feel about that?
Extra gas...fill up every time you can.
Hunting knife.
Spare glasses?
A bag of good weed.
Zombie whistle.
A cable & lock to secure the bikes to a post or tree.
Make sure bikes are in good shape...tires, chain, brakes, etc.
Camera.
Good luck!
 

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A great topic for sure. I don't recall if there has ever been a comprehensive one like it here before. Sure, we've talked about many of the elements, but probably not all in one thread. I dunno.

I think that you plan pretty much the same as if you were going on an extensive adventure ride. That starts with making sure your bike is well maintained with the fuel tank always closer to full than empty. Then setting up your bike with racks and boxes or bags that will accommodate all of the gear your plan to take. I like having many options, so I have a tank bag that I almost always use. Then I have a rear rack that I can attach a 1 gal. Rotopax of fuel & a 1 gal. Rotopax of water. Then I have a set of the larger Versa packs soft saddle bags (from petandhorse.com) that I can put over the Rotopax, and to organize those I use the lighter weight waterproof bags that come in multiple sizes so I can color code and pull individual bags out when needed. Then, I have a medium sized waterproof duffel that my tent, sleeping bag, electronics, and clothing goes in to top off the rear of the bike. Then I have a small set of soft saddlebags that I can put over the fuel tank and the fuel cap goes in the saddle horn hole. These can hold extra tubes, tire tools, or whatever. Finally, I have an over the headlight front rack, which I usually strap my pretty well stocked first aid kit onto.

The point is that you can get all of this kind of stuff. I can load out my bike for whatever kind of ride I plan to do, or I/you can have these things pre-packed and ready to go for an adventure...or an emergency. You can throw it on and strap it down in 10 minutes and be gone. Many use the tool tubes, so they always can carry some extra fuel and or tools, etc.

The TW for sure would make a good get out of Dodge choice. If you are in an emergency situation like in the movies, you could be zooming past on the shoulders, or medians or sidewalks! I would also address the lack of weaponry or personal protections skills, because when you have good stuff...others will want/try to take it.

Having a plan for an a, b, or c destination or general direction would be good. Planning for meet up spots in case of separation every 50 miles or so. Stuff like that might be good along with pre-packed paper maps.

I'm curious to see how this thread develops. :)
 

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If you go to a couple of the Survivalist forums you will get all sorts of great ideas about what to pack. They refer to it as a Bug Out Bag. These are mostly centered around a situation where you have to get out of Dodge real quick and don't have time to fart around. The TW is probably one of the most versatile bikes one could have to Bug Out on. First and foremost on the list is to have your bike all set up with substantial racks bags and such and a way to carry additional fuel. Your TW with a full stock tank will get you between 75 -100 miles. The rear rack you choose is important, my choice would be the Cyclerack with panniers because it can handle a couple hundred pounds. Picking your destination will be most important but will depend on what disaster you are running from. One item I consider an absolute necessity on a TW is a 10 foot length of 1/4 inch clear tubing for siphoning gas. I would want 2 guns. A holstered hand gun on your person for protection and a 22 caliber rifle to hunt squirrels, rabbits and small game for food. Another necessity is a survival water purifier. You don't want to carry a lot of water but they make small survival straws and purifiers that can keep you alive. Remember, you are on a small MC so you will not have the capacity to make your life comfy. If this really is a big concern for you then I would be signing up to take a bunch of classes with a survivalist group. Getting away from the danger of something like a major earth quake is the easy part with a TW and your gear ready to go. Ending up out in the middle of nowhere safe and sound is just the beginning once you realize you know very little about survival without the amenities. You can be sure that many others will be doing the same and lawlessness will be the order of the day.

GaryL
 

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I've been up to the same thing.

Powerpot is nice because it generates thermoelectricity without the noise of the biolite. I have a flashlight, lantern, radio, and walkies that all USB charge off the powerpot. It also works on most cell phones etc.

Look up hobbo stoves. They're lightweight, small, easy to make, low smoke, and very efficient.

Guns are noisy (draw attention) and gunpowder may be limited so I say go with a high power air rifle. If you make one you can avoid CO2 cans and use a pressure tank. You could also use a commonly available (easy to scavenge material) metal stock to make slugs out of. Some hunters are now using the higher powered 50cal ones on big game even.
 

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You may want a gun to get out of a populated area, but otherwise you won't want to draw attention to your location and scare away game when you depend on it.

You can't plan for everything but being more self reliant and less dependent on batteries, fuel, and gun powder would an asset in the long term.

Get to know your wild edibles! The few I know about are actually very tasty! Weighing yourself down with food isn't ideal when you can pack more tools to provide wild foods. A day or too in rations will help you while you set up camp and find food sources. Learn/practice tracking snaring and targeting prey.
 

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cpit, if you are really trying to get out of the Grey Area after a natural disaster you will first be competing with millions of others on congested highways. The more narrow your bike is the easier it will be to slip between cars and make forward progress.
 

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Great ideas are flowing!
A few more thoughts...

In packing/loading the bike, try to keep the load balanced from side to side, heavier to the rear & lighter to the front. Try to avoid
adding weight to handlebars and especially on or above the front wheel.
Tank panniers will allow fine tuning of side to side balance & front to rear loading.
Keep heavy stuff low, lighter stuff higher.
Add more space for light stuff with backpack.

Guns...personally I would probably just go with a pistol, on your person. Still a good idea to have a carry permit if possible. There is no downside and you might run into civilization and avoid a problem. You will be overloaded in space & weight. A rifle would be nice but can you afford to carry an extra, much heavier, larger weapon? I fully understand the tradeoffs between hand & long guns...and I would go with a well chosen pistol...and not necessarily a semi-auto. Revolvers have their advantages too.

If you don't have experience riding with heavy loads...get some. Practice riding standing up. If you are tall and have to hump-over to ride standing, consider bar risers or taller bars. Watch cable length...lots of info on this forum about that.

You will probably want to lower your overall gearing (larger rear sprocket and/or smaller front sprocket). Especially with a heavy load, climbing obstacles, steep grades, etc. The bike will be much easier to ride and more capable. The guys here can provide great input on this.

If you will be in bear country, find out about them & bear defense! I can't help you there...but I was almost trampled by a Bison once!

Have fun with this and keep us posted!
 

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I have an Oh Shit bag already packed and ready to go if needed. It's the BARE minimum.

But as far as getting out of the Bay Area, I would start looking at the maps, and even do some pre-scouting to find the best routes out of the area. You already know the freeways are gonna be a complete mess. Finding roads or trails or anything to help get out of there will be key.

For example... I would want to head west first, then probably north or northwest towards the mountains, or towards Oregon (only because there's plenty of fresh water there). Nevada is great but unless you're headed for a major metro area like Reno, freshwater is pretty scarce. If its' Summertime, the Sierra Nevadas will do fine at least for the short-term.

if I were still living in Pleasanton or that area, I'd probably work my way towards Hwy 4. From the Pleasanton area, finding a way to Vasco Road would be good. If up in Concord, Marsh Creek Road (from Clayton Road) is another way to get down that way. It'll take you through Brentwood and out towards Stockton. If you stay on Hwy 4, it'll take you up into the Sierras and give you lots of other ways to get to Placerville or Sacramento or wherever.

Keep in mind that this is one of the only ways out of the Bay Area that don't require going over one of the big bridges.

From the South Bay, I'd probably head up towards Mt. Hamilton on Hwy 130. Again, it's a route that many cars won't even consider. It's perfect for a bike. That'll get you all the way over to I-5. I've done that drive a few times and it's pretty and fun. Not that that's important in an disaster, but you know what I mean. :)

If you're in San Francisco... well... good luck. The bike is definitely the answer there because it'll be a matter of just finding the best way out of the area depending on what's even possible.
 

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Tent, hammock, revolver, fire starter, light synthetic sleeping bag (down loses thermal properties when wet), great hiking boots and wool socks (3 pair), wool blanket.

I'd recommend highest quality of everything. look into either a smith and wesson governor, (can shoot multiple types of rounds - .410 shotgun, 45 long colt and .45 ACP) OR .357 - can shoot .38spcl.

No weed. get caught with firearm and this?? Big trouble. Sorry, beer is heavy leave at home.

MRES or mtn. house!! - at least 5 days worth.

A great knife and hatchet.

Compass, if you're directionally challenged.

Buy a survival book. I can't think of the one I have, but it's old and wonderful. Has great illustrations on a few types of shelters and offers knowledge of a variety of important items in the sticks.

Head of those hills! Large cities are scary, as it will be hard to evacuate and everyone will likely be heading for the Sierras -yikes, I'm in Reno :eek:. I would go toward Placerville, Fairplay area if you could - lower elevation, rivers and plenty of forests.

EDIT: - TOM BROWNS field guide!!
 

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FUEL, with the grid down if you don't have it you are walking or pedaling. Rotating a few 5gal jugs in storage might be a good idea. With the earthquake looming over us here in the NW, we are going to lose a lot of infrastructure. It will be weeks before we get bridges and such back up. Getting supplies into our area will be next to impossible.
 

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All good ideas, and first I would move further out of the high population area. I mean where my home is that I would be evacuating from. What is the current population of the greater Bay area? That number is how many people that will be in evac mode and competing with you for space and resources... of course it all depends on the type of disaster and how wide spread it is.
 
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