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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The past few years I haven't been driving as far and have been more interested in hard enduro style driving. Too many dependents, work, and not enough camping....

I plan to:
- remove the racks
- get a shinko sr241 front tire
- smaller headlight
- install handguards

And I'm considering a smaller front tire, longer forks, swing arm extender, smaller battery. These changes are more dramatic and pricey so I'm going to do more research and contemplation before I waste time and money on serious mods. I know it will never be a race level bike, but I'd like to ride more technical terrain. I've been looking all over youtube and most TW references to enduro are far from hard enduro and don't appear to be harder then any riding I've done.

Any big enduro riders? Thoughts?

Oh yeah and a smaller/lighter gas tank..

Edit...
Anyone considering similar mods see http://tw200forum.com/forum/performance-customization/6998-guide-building-adventure-ready-tw200.html
and
https://procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html#sumo-fender
To get ya started
 

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Mr.Gizmo at creek.jpg I purchased the Mr.Gizmo bike from forum member Gerry who equipped it with longer travel suspensions both front and rear that are significantly more compliant than stock. Not hard enduro rated but certainly much better at traversing the nasties at speed without spitting you off. Try-Z forks up front are set up for about 9 inches of travel and a blaster shock gives about 2 more inches of post-sag compression travel. Look for his build posts for inspiration at the affordable end of the spectrum..
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Fred ...that bike has a great stance with the added suspension below the axle.

PeterB....I haven't been to any open trails for bikes, just the one we groomed in our backwoods, forestry roads, and atv trails. A good variety of terrain and I'd like to set up some natural obstacles on our trail closer to home. Save the 30 min+ rides to get to somewhere challenging. I've been doing some difficult riding but it gets tiring quick.
 

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I wouldn't go for a smaller fuel tank. Just run with less fuel and put the fuel foam in to stop it from sloshing around.
The lack of ground clearance on the TW is what is going to hold you back on the trails that are rutted out or you have to do a tree crossing.
An ATV tire goes along way in providing traction on the loose step trails and gearing the bike down will allow you to go almost any where.

It will never be a hard enduro machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My thinking with the tank is (merely consideration at this point) I can drive as far as I used to back in the forestry roads twice on one tank so a 1 gallon plastic tank would cut a lot of top weight. Like a TTR110 tank...Otherwise I can bring extra gas when needed or switch back to stock tank later if I need to.

I've managed rutting by picking my line carefully. And have cleared 2 foot+ high fallen trees as long as they're thick. But I have bent my brake lever on a stump so I can appreciate a little more height.

I know it's not a competition level machine but I think it can be an even more capable one then sock. The bucking and bottoming out suspension could use much improvement. Bar risers helped set my weight back on the seat for better shock response, but then I have to slide forward to get more front traction at times. Good thing it has a long seat. lol
 

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I'm fairly new at riding dirt bikes but I think is a lot of fun pushing the limits of this little beast. If I wanted to do a little more aggressive riding and still have a little dual sport bike, the easiest thing would be to trade it for a XT250. More power, six gears, more travel and front/rear disc brakes.
 

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I often wonder what “more technical” actually means – for me, unless you’re constantly grounding the skid plate (for instance) it’s just one of Fred’s “easy rides”

The often “soggy” suspension of something like the XT250 is just as likely to get you into trouble – whereas the harder shorter suspension of the TW (together with the gearing) can often get you out of it

Horses for courses, but I prefer the ability to get the occasional foot down if needed, at which point, the TW is quite “spritely” – on the XT, the tendency is to stay on the pegs, requiring a different style of riding

I’m old and stubborn, same as the TW – but with age comes some wisdom – pick your route with care and you’ll be fine …….

As for “mods” – a basic “Manrack” will help if you ever need to pick the bike up – but personally I prefer to carry a couple of spare levers rather than faff about with handguards (doesn’t suit everybody, but it works for me) – Lithium batteries are good simply because they don’t leak in a tumble – and of course a decent bash plate

90% of the weight in a fuel tank is the petrol itself – trying to save weight on a smaller tank is a lot more complicated than going out with the tank only half full – the stock tank isn’t exactly bulky

Protective riding gear – can’t emphasise this enough – if you’re upping the stakes, then you also need to “up” your gear – it’s a contact sport

Always carry a camera – pics or it didn’t happen - (and we need the laughs) .... :p
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well I'm not about to trade in my Tdub It's too fun. Nor can afford a second bike so some minor mods could help with it's short comings. I prefer being able to reach the ground easier too. I'm tall but most bikes are silly tall...My bicycles of preference are BMX and lowriders.

A WR250 sounds like fun but may be still heavier then I'd like. More suited to motocross isn't it?

For ideal enduro I think I'd opt for a YZ250.

For me standing, using your legs as an extension of your shocks, clutch work and shifting your weight for preload and traction dictates technical for me. Skid plate has very little to do with it IMO. Keeping your ass planted... not so much. Still fun and nice to get out but not the most challenging unless you enjoy getting bucked like a bull. lol
 

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If your gonna do some rough off road imo the basic have to have's is a skid plate, bar protectors, and from what kinda riding your suggesting I'd say better suspension. Some decent tires also front and rear. Maybe get new fork springs and emulators, and a better rear shock. And of course good riding gear. At least...... a helmet, gloves and good ankle high boots. As far as the rest goes for the TW its not gonna make much of a difference. If your out by yourself, a kick start or jump pac would also be very important. This is what I would do imo atleast.
 

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We don't really know how well your TW is already equipped TrailWoman, nor the severity of the trails that either challenge you or the trail type that requiries an improved TW.
My Mr.Gizmo post was simply pointed out one of several affordable options just get a few more inches of travel to soften the surprise G-outs our mild 13HP occasionally serve up. It works for that. Certainly Emulators and stiffer forks have been recommended as good investments.
Certainly the Trick-Z forks extend well below the axle centerline and as such are not the best for the deep ruts carved by conventional MX bikes in cohensive soils.
So, what are your riding areas like? I envision the glacially eroded remains of the northernmost end of the Appalachians as they dive into the North Sea, a mix of forests, rock and glacial till. What is it really like? BLUEROCKS2.jpg
 

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Purple, hand guards or bark busters are a must for technical trail riding. I don't have them on to prevent lever breakage, but to stop tree bark from applying the front brake causing me to suddenly depart the bike over the handles bars or a tree grabbing the clutch on a steep climb and losing all power and any hope of making it up the incline. They also prevent nasty bruises to your hands in these unforeseen situations.

In Moab they do help prevent lever breakage when you do let you bike fall over.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
We don't really know how well your TW is already equipped TrailWoman, nor the severity of the trails that either challenge you or the trail type that requiries an improved TW.
My Mr.Gizmo post was simply pointed out one of several affordable options just get a few more inches of travel to soften the surprise G-outs our mild 13HP occasionally serve up. It works for that. Certainly Emulators and stiffer forks have been recommended as good investments.
Certainly the Trick-Z forks extend well below the axle centerline and as such are not the best for the deep ruts carved by conventional MX bikes in cohensive soils.
So, what are your riding areas like? I envision the glacially eroded remains of the northernmost end of the Appalachians as they dive into the North Sea, a mix of forests, rock and glacial till. What is it really like? View attachment 146362
Currently I'm running a sr244...241 would be better.
The only other mods I made is bar riser extenders, racks installed, street lights and a custom tool tube, and rear fender.

Your not far off. That's a general description of the province. Very much the Appalachian foothills of the north. Mostly under 200 meters above sea level. In my region it's mostly dense forest with loam soil, mud and marsh, with the occasional exposed bedrock and yeah glacially displaced rock. The forestry roads vary seasonally. Rutted and pot holed in the spring. They level out some and get dusty in the summer. Some spots have loose rocks from wash outs. Most of the rutting is from truck, atvs. Most of the bikes I see back there are among my few friends.

I'd like to build natural obstacles in my trail out back to improve my skills. Logs, rocks, jumps, etc.

While my Tdub can handle the terrain it takes a lot of effort and still the shocks bottom out and the back end threatens to buck me at times. I only weight 140 lbs. A small rock (1'H x 3'L) in my path can feel like a boulder on a trials bike. I see people twice my weight slam through obstacles with no effort and no bottoming out of their shocks.

On the other hand I'm getting a lot better at keeping up with the xr250 and crf250x I ride with. So much so that a new crf250 rider couldn't keep up with me. There's also been times where they all gets stuck and tortoise we all know and love leaves the hares in their trenches. That makes it all worth while.
 
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