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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm not sure when the word Hack was coined...Us old timers always called them "tricks of the trade or just ingenious ideas". Well anyway I have a few to start with. Share your Hacks. :)

I've shone this one before on how to keep the nut in place on the flooded batteries while securing the battery cables. It's a tie wrap with the anchor eyelet

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My grease/dust cover is old and lose on my front wheel so I installed a tie wrap to keep it from backing off.

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Not sure where I got this idea... probably someone on this forum but it works great to remove and install Grips.

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YOUR TURN!!!
 

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When you break your OEM chain guide as I did, or go to a larger than 50 tooth rear sprocket you will want a suitably sized replacement to protect the sprocket and chain. Simply cut a custom sized shape from cutting board HDPE plastic. Easy, cheap, quick and effective.
Here is poor photo of my current 55 tooth protector painted in a matching orange, perhaps twice the size of busted OEM chain guide. 21465bc8b91212677055f7910360777b.jpg
 

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My battery terminal nut hold is a piece of battery vent hose under the nut to hold it tight against the terminal. A cruel battery designer came up with the bolts that are about a mm too short to reach the nut when installing a battery! The air hose grip removal is another trick I also use and works great. I've seen a square drive deck screw used to hold the square valve adjuster bolt. I've used a spoke ground down to fit down a gas tank locking cap to remove the tumbler. Various re-purposed tools converted to flat screw drivers to reach pilot adjustment screws.
 

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Stroking a screwdriver with a strong magnet can magnetize it enough to hold small screws for installations on angled or inverted locations. I also save thin wall tubing odds and ends for similar use of keeping screw on bit.
Similarly a small piece of masking tape inside a socket can help hold a nut in place in the socket during installations.
 

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Ken, you could go overboard like these valve adjusting jewel-tools from our own Gerry's Shunkworks. Gerry is such a nice guy he made me a prototype for evaluation. I told him it worked fantastic, but I would drop it occasionally while juggling feeler gauge, wrench and adjuster all at once while snugging up the final little bit. Next thing I know a second one shows up in the mail with a rare earth magnet that really stays put on top of the valve stem while I slowly snug up the nut while monitoring feeler gauge drag. Hand turned and knurled aluminum on his lathe, "scratch" signed by the artist no less.:)
Unexpected generosity from an outstanding forum member.
But then that is getting to be the norm here.
 

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What's that fancy thing the tool is sitting on? It kinda looks like money. I have similar ones, but they only have a "1" on them... :p

Gerry's quite talented, he sent several of those around.
Ken, you could go overboard like these valve adjusting jewel-tools from our own Gerry's Shunkworks. Gerry is such a nice guy he made me a prototype for evaluation. I told him it worked fantastic, but I would drop it occasionally while juggling feeler gauge, wrench and adjuster all at once while snugging up the final little bit. Next thing I know a second one shows up in the mail with a rare earth magnet that really stays put on top of the valve stem while I slowly snug up the nut while monitoring feeler gauge drag. Hand turned and knurled aluminum on his lathe, "scratch" signed by the artist no less.:)
Unexpected generosity from an outstanding forum member.
But then that is getting to be the norm here.
 

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Zip ties are wonderful things! So useful!!!
If you've ever had your rear brake light suddenly not work - but the bulb is okay - check the line that runs from your brake switch to the brake pedal.
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There is a hook at the bottom of the metal rod that can vibrate out of the lever loop. Adding a loose zip tie will fill enough of the space to keep the hook from bouncing out.
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Do you get tired of waiting for your bike to cool before adding a tarp, or have difficulty trying to find the best way to bungie it down? Use weighted bottles instead!
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I use the small Vitamin Water bottles, but Gatoraide or any other heavy plastic will work. I had some ball bungies hanging around, but paracord works well too.
  1. It's recommended to clean the bottle before using or it might draw ants.
  2. Fill the bottle 3/4 full of sand, cement, or plaster-of-paris and re-cap. (If you need to set the cement or plaster, add the appropriate amount of water now and shake well - then wait 10 - 15 minutes before continuing.)
  3. Use a 1/4" bit to drill a hole in the bottle cap, and clean up any flashing that remains.
  4. If you use paracord, cut a 20" to 24" length and make a loop with a very large knot at the end.
  5. Feed the loop of the paracord or bungie ball through the inside of the cap so the ball or knot will be inside the bottle.
  6. Cap the bottle. You can either leave it as-is to make the next step easier, or wrap the cap with tape to keep water from dripping into the hole.
  7. Cover your item with the tarp and thread the bottle's loop through 2 of the tarp holes, then loop the bottle through the loop so it pulls closed.
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Now you have an inexpensive weight that will allow you to pull the tarp off when needed, but will keep all but the most fierce wind from blowing it away.
 

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Come on now, in motorcycle language a hack is a sidecar. It has been that way for about a hundred years.
You are trying to steal the term and use it in the way that computer geeks use it.
A term motorcyclists improperly stole from my families long line of golfers no doubt! :p



Tom
 

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I did a 27 year career as a Hack working in the NY Prison System. I am pretty good at hacking just about anything except a damn computer. I've had a couple of them I wanted to use a hack saw on though but opted for a sledge hammer on one.

GaryL
 

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Before Motorcycles a hack was a taxi. Fastening a chair onto a motorcycle to carry a passenger made it natural to adopt the term to sidecars.
I suspect that in golf the term was actually hacker, in reference to the way an unskilled player might swing a club.
A "hacker" is a term that describes an individual golfers talents or lack thereof. A "hack" is a collective term to describe a large group of poor golfers. My original argument stands;)



Tom
 

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