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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm a bit of a do-it yourselfer and I also like to save a buck. I changed all the lights to LED except for the brake light and will probably do that also. I bought the headlight on Ebay and everything else on Amazon. here's the breakdown of the what it all cost.

Cree Headlight 4x6" Hi/Low beam
for Kenworth and other large trucks. $38.00 and I saw it for 27 a couple of days later.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/4x6-CREE-LED-Headlight-Projector-Crystal-Sealed-High-Low-Beam-DRL-for-Chevrolet-/222962554656

Metal for headlight Bracket $11.00

LUYED 2 x 900 Lumens Super Bright 1157 $13.00
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DNNDVFG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

LUYED 2 x 650 Lumens 12v-24v 1156 $9.00
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0173805LU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

4PCS ARTR 50W 6ohm Load
Resistors With Extra Long Wire 17.7 Inch $9.00
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L4V9ECY/ref=dp_prsubs_2


Misc. $5.00
Total $85.00 If you want to do the brake light add 13 bucks for 2 more 1157's. So for less than 100 dollars you can go total LED.

The turn signals are easy as your dealing with male/female connectors. I removed the clear plastic open end tube from the connectors soldered the load resistors leads to the male connectors . Coated the connectors with
dielectric grease and used heat shrink tubing. This makes for a much better water resistant connection than that from the factory. The front and rear are pretty much the same all you have to do for the front is determine which wires are the turn signals which takes about 10 seconds. The biggest hassle is removing the parts to get to the wiring even that's not bad.

A picture of the Luyed LED's


And here's a couple of videos showing some of the process.


 

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Good prices!
The 1156 & 1157 LED bulb swap is a simple plug-n-play option with the most difficult part being selecting the desired lumens from all the options out there.
A simple digital adjustable rate flasher is another cheap plug-n-play option that avoids any wiring modifications, around $4 from China or $10 from Napa.
If one does want to chop into the wiring a single load resistor if wired into the common ground rather than four individually wired into each turn signal's hot lead achieve the same flash rate correction. I had bought the recommended 4-pack for one of my bikes but then turned on my brain and realized circuitry only needed one resistor for the desired affect. My other bike has the digital flasher with the adjustable flash rate. Both approaches accomplish the goal of stopping the hyper-flash but replacing the flasher is much easier and can be cheaper.
How about a video of the headlight in operation outdoors in a dark environment? For some reason folks tend to show lighting inside their garages but I since rarely ride inside a garage I prefer a more real world demonstration of any benefits or limitations.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Looks good! I'll be getting a new TW soon and I don't have the stones to get into the wiring on brand new bike. I'll probably just drop the $ for the head light kit.

Thanks. It's not that bad and the wiring wasn't cut only piggy backed onto. No wires were cut. When you get it apart and see how it's wired it's a piece of cake and like I said it's pretty much water proof where the heat shrink was used and better than factory. The headlight I used is the same as the kit light just no bracket and is plug and play. I enjoy tinkering and since I'm retired I have the time and I've been doing stuff like this most of my life. I thought about the ready made headlight myself but when I found one just like it minus the bracket I said heck I can make a bracket.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Good prices!
The 1156 & 1157 LED bulb swap is a simple plug-n-play option with the most difficult part being selecting the desired lumens from all the options out there.
A simple digital adjustable rate flasher is another cheap plug-n-play option that avoids any wiring modifications, around $4 from China or $10 from Napa.
If one does want to chop into the wiring a single load resistor if wired into the common ground rather than four individually wired into each turn signal's hot lead achieve the same flash rate correction. I had bought the recommended 4-pack for one of my bikes but then turned on my brain and realized circuitry only needed one resistor for the desired affect. My other bike has the digital flasher with the adjustable flash rate. Both approaches accomplish the goal of stopping the hyper-flash but replacing the flasher is much easier and can be cheaper.
How about a video of the headlight in operation outdoors in a dark environment? For some reason folks tend to show lighting inside their garages but I since rarely ride inside a garage I prefer a more real world demonstration of any benefits or limitations.
Not really chopping the wiring just piggybacking. The single resistor is a good idea but for me laid is played. It's been too cold here in Kentucky to ride especially at night. I'll see what I can do when it warms up. The garage wall works well to show the difference in brightness between the 2 different headlights. We aimed headlights at the Mitsubishi factory when the aiming machines went down we used swing doors with marks for each different models lights. Kind of a movable garage wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Till Death Dual Us Sport™;983420 said:
Looks great! That headlight sure does look like the JNS light.

It does. From all outward appearances it's the same. They had to get them from somewhere. If I didn't have the ability to make a bracket I would have definitely bought a JNS
 

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Wiring in new lights is super easy as you don't have to trace the leads far but it is best to have a crimping tool for the bullet connectors and that the connectors are compatible. I got some that were smaller and required a little extra effort. Still very easy and easy to undo on a new bike without marring anything. Mine is a 2015 new off the lot and look at it now...But I have no plans to ever sell it. No regrets.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wiring in new lights is super easy as you don't have to trace the leads far but it is best to have a crimping tool for the bullet connectors and that the connectors are compatible. I got some that were smaller and required a little extra effort. Still very easy and easy to undo on a new bike without marring anything. Mine is a 2015 new off the lot and look at it now...But I have no plans to ever sell it. No regrets.
That's what made what I did so easy. There was no altering of the factory wiring. Just soldering the leads of the load resistors to the existing factory connectors.
 

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It does. From all outward appearances it's the same. They had to get them from somewhere. If I didn't have the ability to make a bracket I would have definitely bought a JNS
Desert Drifter bought those lights on a tip from me and has an easy work around on the bracket he said he would share soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Desert Drifter bought those lights on a tip from me and has an easy work around on the bracket he said he would share soon.
Cool. I'm all for easy.

Got 2 more of the Luyed 1157 turn/brake light and installed one in the brake light and it works great and I have a spare. The TW is fully LED except for the instrument cluster
 

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As long as the sockets in question have DC rather than the '87's headlight's AC voltage then the LEDSs as described should work fine.
 

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Filming headlights is kinda tricky but it appears you have a faulty headlight. The center projector is the High Beam and should not be illuminated at all when running the Low Beam. A faulty production run of headlights landed stateside in February 2018. I worked with the manufacturer to return and replace all my faulty inventory and at this same time I had them switch from a red Daytime Running Light to a clear/white DRL which is legal in USA/Canada/etc. If your headlight is faulty I recommend returning it so that you are not blinding oncoming traffic which is dangerous, it can also get you pulled over and ticketed.


I'm a bit of a do-it yourselfer and I also like to save a buck. I changed all the lights to LED except for the brake light and will probably do that also. I bought the headlight on Ebay and everything else on Amazon. here's the breakdown of the what it all cost.

Cree Headlight 4x6" Hi/Low beam
for Kenworth and other large trucks. $38.00 and I saw it for 27 a couple of days later.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/4x6-CREE-LED-Headlight-Projector-Crystal-Sealed-High-Low-Beam-DRL-for-Chevrolet-/222962554656

Metal for headlight Bracket $11.00

LUYED 2 x 900 Lumens Super Bright 1157 $13.00
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DNNDVFG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

LUYED 2 x 650 Lumens 12v-24v 1156 $9.00
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0173805LU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

4PCS ARTR 50W 6ohm Load
Resistors With Extra Long Wire 17.7 Inch $9.00
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L4V9ECY/ref=dp_prsubs_2


Misc. $5.00
Total $85.00 If you want to do the brake light add 13 bucks for 2 more 1157's. So for less than 100 dollars you can go total LED.

The turn signals are easy as your dealing with male/female connectors. I removed the clear plastic open end tube from the connectors soldered the load resistors leads to the male connectors . Coated the connectors with
dielectric grease and used heat shrink tubing. This makes for a much better water resistant connection than that from the factory. The front and rear are pretty much the same all you have to do for the front is determine which wires are the turn signals which takes about 10 seconds. The biggest hassle is removing the parts to get to the wiring even that's not bad.

A picture of the Luyed LED's
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Filming headlights is kinda tricky but it appears you have a faulty headlight. The center projector is the High Beam and should not be illuminated at all when running the Low Beam. A faulty production run of headlights landed stateside in February 2018. I worked with the manufacturer to return and replace all my faulty inventory and at this same time I had them switch from a red Daytime Running Light to a clear/white DRL which is legal in USA/Canada/etc. If your headlight is faulty I recommend returning it so that you are not blinding oncoming traffic which is dangerous, it can also get you pulled over and ticketed.
Thanks I appreciate your concern. It's working just the the camera was at a bad angle while at the same time being overloaded by the the low beam so you can't see the high beam switch on and off.
 
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