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I changed my rear sprocket from a 50 to a 47 tooth and it is like a new bike. I did lose some torque but I'm not pulling wheelies or riding straight ups hills (usually). Mostly it's my town and trail bike that was a real a pain to ride on the highway but after replacing the rear sprocket it's much more suited for 5 gears and street riding. Totally recommend changing your rear sprocket (only) for a decrease in rpms at higher speeds. Torque is reduced but the speed gained is worth it. For example; 1st gear to 2nd gear change usually happens around 9-11 mph, now its near 15-18 mph. Tdub for life. Kevin - PA
 

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When you realize the TW makes a great go anywhere bike, you'll acknowledge you're now doing much more street riding because the bike is way more friendly and comfortable with that 47. Once that sinks in, try a 45. With a stock front and 45 rear, I can and do ride with my friends in every environment other than long high speed highway settings. In stock configuration, its too slow to be fun on the trails, but great on rocks and hills. I just don't go those places very often anymore.

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When you realize the TW makes a great go anywhere bike, you'll acknowledge you're now doing much more street riding because the bike is way more friendly and comfortable with that 47. Once that sinks in, try a 45. With a stock front and 45 rear, I can and do ride with my friends in every environment other than long high speed highway settings. In stock configuration, its too slow to be fun on the trails, but great on rocks and hills. I just don't go those places very often anymore.

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"its too slow to be fun on the trails," i have never found that to be true!
 

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I was not taking shortcuts as all the old driveline stuff was very used up. Meaning I replaced both sprockets, the shaft bearings, side plate gasket, and upgraded to a X-ring chain anyway. My choice was to stay with the stock front sprocket.

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47/15 (3.13) vs 45/14 (3.21) ratios so close it'd be hard to even feel the difference.

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I found the stock gearing too low for everything. I think a 47 would be good for most. Im a 15/44 so I'm biased to taller gears. But I get guys gearing thier bikes down. The TW is one bike suited to alot of riders needs
 

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I run a 15/47 for predominantly street use with some occasional trail riding. You're not going to max the RPMs out- that gearing in theory would allow about an 85mph true top speed (or the dash speedo absolutely buried) and the engine does not have the power to shove this bike with the aerodynamics of a brick that fast anyway. A 60-65mph cruise is pretty easy, and it's still useable on trails, although steep or tight stuff will definitely have you working the clutch harder. But 1st gear is actually somewhat useable on the street now. Stock gearing I'd always set off in 2nd.

My old TW with the atv tire on the back I ran 13/50, but the heavy rear tire saps a lot of the bike's power and I used that one almost exclusively off road, so didn't really care about road manners or top speed much.
 

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Speaking of all the gearing changes. I wish that the tdub had the rubber sprocket damper with the rear sprocket attached to it like some of the street bikes. That would be nice to have a set of different sprockets that could be easily swapped out by simply pulling the tire off and dropping in a new damper with the sprocket attached. You could pick your favorite setup for nearly any ride very quickly.
 

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15/50 or 14/47 is the best all around gearing I've used to date for 99% of what I do.. I ran 15/47 on a 1600 mile road trip and personally I think it was a tad to much. I think the 14-45 would be about ideal for mostly road riding however it that gearing does sacrifice off road abilities. I currently run 15/50 and have the majority of the time. The last Colorado mountain trip I ran 15/54 and that was a game changer for high elevation and keeping a steady rpm at 55. Before with 15/50 on roads at high elevation I couldn't get a above 45mph because of the hp loss at high elevation. A buddy of mine bought a tw with a 40 tooth rear sprocket and it would run 68mph in fourth gear and once you shifted into 5th it wouldn't run over 55mph at wfo at low elevation with small guys on it... Over gearing it can be worse for it since the engine is under more of a load.

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While you're considering all the various gearing choices, give serious thought to installing a good windshield to keep your chest from functioning like a parachute. It will add 5 -10 MPH to your normal cruising speed. Really makes a big difference.

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Some members like Cornelus from South Africa have reported sustained 80 mph speeds with the aforementioned gearing coupled with his "cornshield" homemade fairing and a nicely tuned inexpensive Chinese pumper carb.

Now my '06 TW has some serious built-in wide ratio flexibility from the previous owner with dual front sprockets ( 13 & 15 teeth ) and dual rear sprockets (47 & 55). Guess which combo I leave the chain coupled to almost exclusively?
 

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Correct TW-BRIAN. You win the cement bicycle!
Guess those who know me know I am somewhat predictable.
Still Nibbler, a.k.a. MrGizmo, remains the likely candidate for the next off-season 180 mile Yosemite cruise with some of the relaxed road oriented gearing selected. Even so the park's 45 mph max speed limit made the 13x55 previous visit a spirited adventure where acceleration allowed me to nip & tuck around the occasional traffic. If one start early from the relatively deserted Mono Lake side one faces reverse traffic flow most of the day making things much more pleasant, especially over Tioga Pass.
 

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That was an easy guess Fred, considering the terrain that you typically ride :D!

I take exception to those who feel that a 14 x 47 combination is suitable for serious trail riding. I made that mistake once. I had a 47/55 dual rear sprocket setup at the time and was running the 14 x 47 combo. Bikerjosh and I went riding at Carnegie OHV park which has some steep, rocky, rutted single track trails. I was going up a trail with a certain death dropoff on the left and the rocky hillside on my right elbow. Second gear was too tall, I started bogging down and went to downshift to first. I hit neutral instead, lost momentum and began sliding backwards. I had to dump the bike against the uphill side and then fell backwards landing on a sharp rock that hit me just below my back protector. Broken rib, followed by seven weeks of sleeping in a recliner.

Now, my philosophy is that you can never go too big in the rear sprocket when riding off-road and my current favorite setup is 13 x 66.

 

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Gearing choices are definitely a personal choice based on the individual rider. A 15/47 combo might be just right for a 150 pound rider but totally unusable for a 250 pound rider! Just something to keep in mind when reading some of the opinions expressed here.
 

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So you missed a shift and fell over and it’s the bikes fault???? Ha, taking a bit of a piss with you but you bring up a good point. Gear the bike so you can push second gear up everything as long as you maintain momentum.


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