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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Update: 100,000 Kilometers on my Zong

I have now ridden over 40,000 miles on my Chinese copy of the Yamaha TW200, my 2006, Zongshen 200GY-2.
Here are some photographs I took during this evening's ride.















I rebuilt the top end of the engine at 31,500 miles, and my bike has never run better than now.




Spud
 

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Hey Spud,



LTNS. Glad to hear that your Zong is giving good service.



Do you know of a source for a parts breakdown on the Zong? Particularly the flywheel and CDI arrangement.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey Spud,



LTNS. Glad to hear that your Zong is giving good service.



Do you know of a source for a parts breakdown on the Zong? Particularly the flywheel and CDI arrangement.
Howdy, Liz!
You can download a parts catalog for the Zong from the following link at the China Riders website.




http://www.chinariders.net/transfer/spudrider_01-09-2010_123552_LZX200GY-2_parts.pdf



A wiring diagram for the Zong is included in the last pages of the bike's service manual, which you can also download from the China Riders website.




http://www.chinariders.net/transfer/spudrider_01-09-2010_123552_LZX200GY-2EC-Service_Manual.pdf



I see you guys are looking for a less expensive alternative to the Yamaha CDI unit. The Zongshen CDI units are much less expensive; therefore, I keep two spare units on hand.
However, I'm pretty confident the Zongshen CDI unit is not compatible with the TW200 electrical system. Nevertheless, one could easily install the Zongshen stator and pickup coil in a TW200, and then switch to the Zongshen CDI unit.
The cost for this coversion would probably be less than the cost of a Yamaha CDI unit.



I'm not soliciting business; however, I am a Zongshen parts dealer. Therefore, I could get the parts for you guys if you were interested in some kind of group purchase.








Spud
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good to hear from you Spud. Looks like a fine adventure and a great way to roll-in those impressive numbers. Gerry
Thank you, Gerry. I hope you are well; I always enjoy reading your informative, helpful posts.
I have traveled with my Zong to Montana, Wyoming, and Utah, as well as my home state of Idaho. The Zong/TW200 is a rugged, reliable, wonderful little motorcycle!








Spud
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What? No KTM decals yet? Spud you need to become a tour guide.
Howdy, Racer!
You aren't the first person who has suggested I should start a tour service. I initially dismissed the idea, but perhaps I should reconsider.




As you know, I don't plan to put any KTM decals on my Zong.
I'm proud to have my bike bear the Zongshen lettering on the saddle, and the right crankcase cover!







Spud
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Are you running Rotella T or Rotella T6?
Howdy, Rodney.
I have used Rotella T6 in my Zongshen engine for many miles; it's a great motor oil!
However, I have recently starting using the conventional, 15W/40 motor oils, and changing the engine oil every time the odometer turns over another 1,000 miles.








Spud
 

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How much gas does the tank hold?



Can you get me a price quote on cdi/stator/pickup coil?





Looks like lots of fun, and I agree that it doesn't need any KTM decals. Most of the fun for WAY less cost. Why try to be something it isn't?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Your Zong looks more like a XT200 than a TW200. Miles = smiles.
Indeed, I have modified my Zong quite a bit, and have added a lot of XT225 parts.
In stock form, the Zong has an 18-inch, front wheel, and a 15-inch, rear wheel. Since my Zongshen engine has the shorter, XT225 countershaft, I installed an XT225 swingarm on my Zong. Along with the swingarm, I installed an XT225 shock absorber, rear wheel, et cetera.



However, when I rebuilt my top end at 31,500 miles, I used a TW200 piston, gaskets, and piston rings. Instead of replacing the valves, et cetera, I installed a complete, slightly used, XT200 cylinder head that was given to me by a good friend.
The Teikei, MV28 carburetor and airbox on my Zong are virtually identical to the carburetor on the current TW200 bikes. My Zong employs TW200 countershaft sprockets, and I have a TW200 skid plate installed.








Spud
 

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Discussion Starter #13
How much gas does the tank hold?



Can you get me a price quote on cdi/stator/pickup coil?





Looks like lots of fun, and I agree that it doesn't need any KTM decals. Most of the fun for WAY less cost. Why try to be something it isn't?
My Clarke, XT225 fuel tank holds 4.1-gallons. I usually ride 220 miles before I hit reserve at 2.8 gallons, with a generous, 1.3-gallons in reserve.




Getting parts from Zongshen takes patience, and persistence. Therefore, I would be willing to get the parts only if ten or more people were interested.
However, I estimate the stator, pickup coil, and CDI unit combined would cost approximately $165, plus shipping. After the conversion, replacement CDI units would cost approximately $45.








Incidentally, my Zong has a backup kick starter.
If ten or more people were interested, I could also acquire the kick starter parts for TW200 owners.




Spud
 

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Thanks for continuing to keep us updated with your mileage reports. I'm interested in seeing how many miles you can get out of that bike.
 

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Some how,some way I've got to take a trip to your neck of the woods. Your pictures are making me even more tired of this flat land of sugar sand.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am within 25 miles of reaching 42,000 miles on my Zong's odometer.
Therefore, I though it was time to post an update on my Zong.
Several days ago I replaced the fork oil, oil seals, and dust wipers in my 37mm, USD Zongshen forks. These Chinese forks are somewhat different from conventional USD forks, but they perform very well, and are very well manufactured.
Here is a photograph of the outer fork leg after I removed the inner fork leg, oil seal, and oil seal washer.







Here is a photograph of the outer fork leg after I installed the oil seal washer, and the new oil seal.







If you examine the photograph above, you can see the USD Zongshen fork employs 2 inner fork bushings, both of which are installed in the outer fork leg. The first bushing is located at the bottom of the outer fork leg, just inside the oil seal washer, and the oil seal. The second bushing is located about half way down the tube. This fork bushing is held in place by the long, split metal sleeve, which is supported by the bushing below it.



The Zongshen USD forks also employ a cartridge, preload spacers with bushings, and a 20.5-inch spring.







The cartridge is held in place by a bolt at the bottom of the fork. Here is a photograph of the cartridge damping rod extending from the top of the assembled fork. The fork cap, preload spacer, and spring have been removed from this fork.








After installing the new oil seals and dust wipers, I added some new, Mobile1 Synthetic ATF as fork oil, and reassembled the forks. The forks work very well with the Mobile1 Synthetic ATF, and the suspension feels great! I'm also pleased to report my engine is running very well. The Zong is a great little motorcycle.












Spud
 

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I have now ridden over 40,000 miles on my Chinese copy of the Yamaha TW200, my 2006, Zongshen 200GY-2.
Here are some photographs I took during this evening's ride.







I rebuilt the top end of the engine at 31,500 miles, and my bike has never run better than now.




Spud


Thanks for all you have shared with us, great info. I'm still amazed at the longevity of this bike. To bad thy do not make a Zongshen 250GY.



Ronnydog
 

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I don't understand why Zongshen has not contacted you about your bike. Seems to me you have done all the R&D work for them. They at least need to hire you as a state side tester.
 
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