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I'm getting prepared to do a valve check on my 2007 Tdub. I bought it off of CL and it now has 6,700mi. I've done several upgrades and maintenance items including new: sprockets, o-ring chain, oil plug and filter, rear tube and tire, front tube, spedo cable replacement and gear cleaning, shorai battery, Colman seat cover, cycle rack, front brake fluid replacemet and general lubrication. I hear some tapping in the engine after it has warmed up and suspect the valves have never been adjusted given the questionable maintenance given to the other parts of the bike. This forum has made a world of difference in my being able to fix and get ahead of issues, letting me improve my ride skills and enjoyment rather than sitting around trying to find someone(s) to fix it. I've read the tutorial on valve adjustment and am ready to give it a try. In adjusting the valve clearance, four methods are mentioned: needlenose pliers, Robertson deck screw, 1/8" hole filed square, and a Yamaha valve adjusting tool (P/N YM-08035). I believe it is a 3mm square hole that is needed. Is that correct? Where is a good place to buy either the deck screws or the tool? I can find OEM parts online but not the tool. Thanks for your help.
 

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You might find the Yamaha tool on eBay, but I think any tappet tool should work. Motion Pro makes a good one.



Not sure on the size of the decking screw, but any hardware store should have them. Just buy a bunch with different heads, still shouldn't cost more than a buck or two if you can buy individuals at your particular shop.
 

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ProCycle sells a slick little tool in the "engine" section of their TW page. Seems like I'm adjusting the valves on SOMETHING at least once a month around here. Could be $11 well spent:



http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html
 

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GMTA. Er sumpin'. Bet we were only .2 seconds apart. lol.
 

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Get a wood screw that fits the valve adjusting square, drill a pilot hole into a piece of 3/4 inch dowel that is about 1 inch long, run the screw into the dowel and there is your custom made, personally engineered, specifically designed Yahama TW200 valve adjusting tool.
 

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ProCycle sells a slick little tool in the "engine" section of their TW page. Seems like I'm adjusting the valves on SOMETHING at least once a month around here. Could be $11 well spent:



http://www.procycle.us/bikepages/tw200.html




Procycle also makes a tool for the job. Has anyone bought & used it? Work well?



Procycle Valve Tool


right but there are 2 of these type of tools on the page now...one has a knob and one looks more like a wrench...does anyone have a preference?...i'm thinking of picking one up myself
 

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I'd like the flat one for the road, cuz you never know.. and the knobbed one for the garage.



Just did mine yesterday and I'm kinda worried. Third check in 6,000 miles and they haven't budged
 

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Just did mine yesterday and I'm kinda worried. Third check in 6,000 miles and they haven't budged


Paranoia checks!



"There is something wrong somewhere and I am going to find it!"



I must admit I am guilty of it too. The manual says to check them every 4,000 miles.
 

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I'd like the flat one for the road, cuz you never know.. and the knobbed one for the garage.



Just did mine yesterday and I'm kinda worried. Third check in 6,000 miles and they haven't budged




I have a little over 7,000 miles on my '05. I've checked them many times, but only had to make one adjustment so far, and it was on the intake.
 

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I have a little over 7,000 miles on my '05. I've checked them many times, but only had to make one adjustment so far, and it was on the intake.


It's interesting. Hers seem to close up enough to need attention every 3-5,000 miles.



Mine gets beat on twice as hard and twice as often as hers. I always check, cuz u gotta, but mine really haven't benn off by more than a thousandth in the last 12,000 miles or so.
 

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Just did a valve adjustment on my 2010 and only had to tighten up the intake by .001 to .003 and exhaust was perfect at .005. One thing I noticed was that my intake valve cover was upside down so I looked on my other TW and the wide side was on the right as I thought it should be so that the V inside will be at the top to direct oil splash onto the valve.... then I thought ... ok I was the last guy to work on that one too :-( ... so I checked the parts diagram to be sure and yes the thicker side goes to the right side (when your sitting on the bike)
Another point is I used a bent #2 Robertson wood screw as a valve adjustment too as mentioned earlier in this thread and I must say it worked perfect. I can't imagine a purchased tool working any better than this.
003.JPG 005.JPG 002.JPG
 

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I suppose the backwards cover is at least an indication that someone at least tried to lavish a little maintenance attention on your bike. Some previous owners seem to think that "Don't fix it untill it's broken" also means "Don't maintain it until its broken".
That has to be the fanciest trick valve adjustment for the shop imaginable (elite makes a smaller portable one from a phillips screw to carry on the bike). I really like the aggressive knurling on the ergonomically correct handle's grip coupled with the sharp point for chasing the cover screw threads clean prior to reassembly. Truly a fine tool.:)
 

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Get a wood screw that fits the valve adjusting square, drill a pilot hole into a piece of 3/4 inch dowel that is about 1 inch long, run the screw into the dowel and there is your custom made, personally engineered, specifically designed Yahama TW200 valve adjusting tool.
This ^^^^^^
 
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