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I know the vise grips are working for you but I cringe when I see how they chew up bolt heads. These wobble head allen wrenches can help in tight access
 

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I was convinced my tapping noises were valve conditions but after readjusting with no change it actually went away when I put a new intake boot. It was so dry and filed with hair line cracks it must have had a leak

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk
 

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I just did my first valve adjustment too. Totally did bottom dead center first try. The cam mark is so easy to get to and use, just 2 bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I readjusted my valves today and made sure to tighten the locknuts real tight. I checked the cam chain tensioner and did an oil change. Tapping noise still present :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I was convinced my tapping noises were valve conditions but after readjusting with no change it actually went away when I put a new intake boot. It was so dry and filed with hair line cracks it must have had a leak

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I sprayed lubricant onto my boots while the motor was running but saw/heard no difference. I think it's definitely the valves at fault.
 

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I had the same problem. No matter how many times I adjusted the valves "tic, tic, tic, tic".

Remove the adjusting screw and look at the end of the valve stem. If it is concave feeler gauges won't work. They just bridge the concavity giving a false reading.

Auto part Font Rim Metal Bicycle part Material property Font Metal

You can adjust it by "feel". Wiggle the rocker arm up and down and make sure there is some clearance but less than when you used the feeler gauge. Good luck, Tony
 

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I'm sure someone will take this wrong, but it really bugs me so here goes;
language on this thread is VERY sloppy in description on setting valves. Enough that it will surely cause someone to set their valves wrong.

First, is the actual measurement in setting valve clearances. The only mention of settings doesn't even indicate inches or millimeters. To clarify;
intake 0.05 - 0.09 mm
exhaust 0.11 - 0.15 mm

Next;
Getting to TDC. This is EXTREMELY critical. Those three marks on the flywheel are for both TDC and timing advance. Looking at the 3 marks, it is the far right mark that is TDC. The crank turns counter clockwise. That means the first two marks come up first. These are timing marks. Timing is usually measured in degrees of advance. See? these marks are in advance of the TDC mark, which follows those first two marks. Those marks bracket the timing advance. The timing advance is 9 degrees. So, if you set up your valves for adjustment using the FIRST, or far left of the three marks, you'll be off by probably 10 degrees from TDC. The better way to set TDC for the valve timing is with the cam cover off and aligning up the marks on the cam gear to the mark on the cylinder head. When those are lined up, the crank marks should be lined up on the far right of the three marks. If it isn't, then there is a timing problem between the crank (piston) and the valves. That isn't good and could result in a valve hitting the piston if it's off by too much.

Anyways, I just thought it was important to make clear that setting valves is something where detail matters.
I'm sure those that have posted in this and many other threads are just trying to help out. This forum is a wealth of information in regards to the TW. The manuals are available on this forum and should be consulted before any technical work is performed. (At least I know I'll read the manual before trusting something I read on the internet(no offence meant to anyone here but you never know)). I use the info here as a guideline even though there are plenty of threads that are spot on as far as procedures go, many others simply add much needed clarification to the procedures in the manuals.
 

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The wear occurs at the valve seat; where the face of the valve meets the cylinder combustion chamber. As that area wears, the stem of the valve moves up, closer to the adjuster and the gap closes.
I have heard this before but it has not been my experience.

The post before yours shows where the end of the valve stem wore into a concavity and the clearance was increased. The tip of the adjusting screw was also worn, increasing the clearance (and was also replaced with the valve).

When I removed the valve from the head both the valve face and valve seat had a coating of carbon on them. The engine ran fine. If valve seat / valve face wear was occurring I would expect metal to metal contact. No doubt the carbon was do to an overly rich carb or oil leaking into the cylinder -- hopefully both conditions have been corrected -- so who knows, maybe metal to metal contact is now being made and wear is occurring.

The last time I set the clearance on my valves I set the intake at .0025" and the exhaust at .0045" and that was approx. 10,000 miles ago. I checked the clearance approx. 5,000 miles ago and no adjustment was necessary and I should probably check them again soon. The engine doesn't make any tic, tic, tic sounds so I am not anticipating having to adjust anything, but one never knows until one checks.

I have come to the conclusion that all moving parts wear. In the case of valves, when they wear adjustments are necessary and that adjustment may be to increase of decrease the clearances to bring them back to what the service manual calls for.

As I said in the beginning, this has been my experience. Tony
 
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