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Discussion Starter #1
I'm wondering if anyone else has noticed this strange problem.



Here in Kansas it's common to have 25~30 plus winds. When I am riding with a cross wind coming from the right, every once in a while a gust of wind will cause the bike to stall. The harder the wind is blowing the more pronounced the stall.



If I turn into or with the wind, or even turn around and have the same cross wind only from the left, the bike runs fine. No loss of power, no symptoms. This only happens when the wind is from my right.



I'm wondering if the shape of the air box is causing a vacuum at the intake. Kinda like blowing across the top of a straw in a drink. At first I wasn't sure it was really happening, but I've actually been able to reproduce the effect by going out & finding a road that is angled the right way with the wind. It's Kansas, wind is easy to find.



 

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i have drilled large holes into my air box cover, wondering if this might help your issue. the carb can breath through these holes when needed in your case. the holes are under the left side cover, somewhat protected. the air box cover can easily & cheaply be replaced if need be. good luck
 

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We've got 40+mph winds right now, and I've had this problem all day long. Seems like the issue occurs anywhere from about -30 degrees off a headwind to a direct 90 degree crosswind: either direction. I'm suspecting that it creates a reversed vacuum from what the engine is naturally doing, literally vacuum sealing the intake for short durations. My bike is running painfully lean, so drilling holes in the airbox is exactly the opposite of what I'd like to do.. Does anyone else have a creative solution to this issue?
 

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For what it's worth: I found a brief workaround if the issue is gusting wind instead of sustained: my problem is that while it stalls riding at speed, it stalls more prominently at stop lights (and i have a dead battery, which means kick starting it in traffic...):

Choke it.. not all the way, but maybe 1/4 to 1/3 of the way out, just bumps the idle up a bit and gives it more fuel: i made it home without any stalling, even though winds are susataining at 25-30mph and gusting to 40+.
 

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For what it's worth: I found a brief workaround if the issue is gusting wind instead of sustained: my problem is that while it stalls riding at speed, it stalls more prominently at stop lights (and i have a dead battery, which means kick starting it in traffic...):

Choke it.. not all the way, but maybe 1/4 to 1/3 of the way out, just bumps the idle up a bit and gives it more fuel: i made it home without any stalling, even though winds are susataining at 25-30mph and gusting to 40+.
If it runs well with the enrichment knob pulled partway out, you'll likely find a properly jetted carburator will cure your problem. I've ridden in sustained winds up to 70mph with gusts to 95mph and not had engine problems. I've had problems keeping the bike in its lane and problems dodging flying crap (literally--the wind was strong enough to tumble porta-potties hundreds of yards), but Tdub kept running perfect.



By the way, when riding in strong crosswinds, stand on the pegs, lean the bike into the wind, and sit back down on the edge of the seat--straightline stability is much improved.
 

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Good advice!




I know the bike is running lean and that rejetting will help substantially.. something I haven't been able to afford yet, and now tires are high on my list as well! I wouldn't say the bike runs "well" with the choke knob pulled slightly, but it stays running.



I'll know more around autumn, I suspect, after the bike has been rejetted and the winds return.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We've got 40+mph winds right now, and I've had this problem all day long. Seems like the issue occurs anywhere from about -30 degrees off a headwind to a direct 90 degree crosswind: either direction. I'm suspecting that it creates a reversed vacuum from what the engine is naturally doing, literally vacuum sealing the intake for short durations. My bike is running painfully lean, so drilling holes in the airbox is exactly the opposite of what I'd like to do.. Does anyone else have a creative solution to this issue?


Hey! Finally. Been a few months since I started this thread.



Nice to know I wasn't just imagining things. I haven't had this problem since moving to Georgia. Too many trees to get a strong, steady cross wind at road level.




It was a major pain out on the flat-lands when the wind was quartering me on my way to or from work.




Only thing is, I didn't have the problem with the wind hitting the left side. It was only when blowing from the right.




I never did figure out a fix. (other than moving to another state!
)

 

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Well, it was already in my plan to try qwerty's fix of rejetting the bike, interesting to note that yours is a later (07) TW and mine an earlier (97). I don't come across the problem often, yesterday just happened to be particularly bad and it may have only been from one side; I was too busy cracking the throttle to keep it running in traffic




I see you've put jets in yours, so I can't be too sure it'll fix mine either. Seems like nobody else has had this issue, or hasn't recognized it. Took me a while to figure out that the bike was actually stalling instead of just losing power. Very strange, indeed.
 
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