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:eek:
 

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Best to slow down when front wheel oscillates...which appears to be the situation, no?
 

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Saw this on FB earlier in the week. Driver says he entered freeway which was bumpy (poor pavement) and he was accelerating hard in first gear getting up to 70'ish and when he hit second gear hard and he was sitting too far back and that is when the front wheel started to oscillate. He went under and slid back out the other side with only some nasty road rash on his right knee which you can see in the video. Yes he knows just how lucky he was.....could have been so much worse!
 

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Some bikes are more stable than others. He should consider a different motorcycle, AND he should start wearing more gear, judging from the tore up pants and injured leg. Most people don't think of these things until after something like this happens.
 

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Tank slappers can be tricky – you so much as touch the front the front brake and you’re gone – touch the rear brake and it pushes the front of the bike down while it’s unstable (and you’re gone just the same)

Last time I was in that situation was years ago – close to 100mph on a Suzuki GT550 triple – my friend following behind said my rear wheel was going from side to side at about three feet. (Rubber swinging arm - what can you do)

I had no choice but to ride it out, “feel it through”- possibly more luck than judgement, but I figure the message here is “no sudden moves” …..
 

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I had one at 120 mph on a Suzuki GS1000, didn't dare touch anything, just slowly backed off on the throttle.
Tank slappers can be tricky – you so much as touch the front the front brake and you’re gone – touch the rear brake and it pushes the front of the bike down while it’s unstable (and you’re gone just the same)

Last time I was in that situation was years ago – close to 100mph on a Suzuki GT550 triple – my friend following behind said my rear wheel was going from side to side at about three feet. (Rubber swinging arm - what can you do)

I had no choice but to ride it out, “feel it through”- possibly more luck than judgement, but I figure the message here is “no sudden moves” …..
 

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Some bikes are more stable than others. He should consider a different motorcycle, AND he should start wearing more gear, judging from the tore up pants and injured leg. Most people don't think of these things until after something like this happens.
More gear is always an good idea and I try to follow that rule when I ride my Harley. However, you’d need to be dressed up like Ironman to come out alive after passing under the wheels of a semi. The leather would “maybe” hold some of the parts together. I used to paraglide and had the backpack motor that went with it. I sold it because of a few close calls that scared the hell out me and bought the Harley. Looking back at that decision now I think the paraglider was safer.
 

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Never had it happen to me...

The rule, from reading and videos is to move your weight rearward and slow down....

I had a new 15 speed bicycle that would start wobbling like that if i let go of the bars, going more than 10mph... It was odd.

Jim
 

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A “tank slapper” typically happens at speed – but with a smaller bike, you can come across this at under 50 mph

Bringing this back to the TW200 – the nearest thing I’ve found is at an indicated 68mph, I felt the front becoming unstable, and backed off the throttle – K60/TW34

“Getting a wobble on” is easy – getting out of it takes a calm head ….
 

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I hit a pothole on my TW one time and it caused a brief tank slap. I think I just slowed down and it stopped. Does anyone know the science behind the tank slapper? I'm sure many of you remember the old cars with poor suspension. When you went to fast or turned the wheel too quick the body sway would throw you and the car back and forth in a fit of rage. My guess is that the tank slapper is similar. Under extreme circumstances the fork pressure is unbalanced and the fork springs, recoil, dampening and the turning of the wheel are all fighting each other which results in the tank slapping.
 

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As you go down the road the front wheel is actually very slightly weaving. Not enough to be noticeable but it's happening. You can sometimes hit a resonance that causes that to amplify and you get a tanknslapper. Tire wear, suspension wear, steering head bearings ect all play a role in it.

Most folks instinct is going to be to brake or slow down. In most cases the best way to combat it is to accelerate. Though thats not always the case.

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/tank-slappers-and-the-way-to-avoid-them/167234.article

https://motorbikewriter.com/avoid-tank-slapper/

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