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lately I’ve been building a stealth adventure van for road trips and decided a TW200 would be a great addition. Unfortantly, I didnt want to tow a trailer, and other hitch carriers were not suitable or up to my standards a quality. check out my video to see how it works with the tw200 and holds up on the road


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XlhkAGGxePw
 

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Great video!
We van guys like the hydraulic jacks. Rav7dMA+Qj2VE8DKxGmCXw_thumb_67.jpg
We find all sorts of uses for them:


Here Bad Luck demonstrates their use as a bike lift and repair stand. rackjpg.jpg
Been there, done that...great for servicing chain and flat fixes at camp.

Mine also does kitchen duty in camp.:p rack stove.jpg
Not being limited by a trailer greatly increases nimbleness and ability to explore for the perfect camp spot. Daedalous has got himself a good carrier!
 

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Stands too far away from the vehicle it won't work on my Subaru Forester because the suspension will be sagging too much. My rail is much tighter to the bumper and, while there's sag, not so as much as that unit will cause.
Jacks the TW up too high to work on the front receiver hitch on my pick up truck. I carry a camper on the truck and my TW on the front. The rail I use keeps the bike at hood level, This carrier will put it much higher. Looks like nearly a foot higher than a rail.

Too many stickers. Stickers fade, peel and look shabby. Would look much better without any at all.
 

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"Other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how'd you like the play?" :D
 

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Much of the remaining wobble occurs within the four bar linkage itself. With vibration the pivot bolts tend to oblate the mild steel of the bars, platform and frame itself. This is something that exacerbates itself over time and will just get worse with use. The rate of deformation of the pivot holes certainly can be lessened by reducing the vibration. I use 4 tension straps from front and rear of bike to 4 corners of the van to lessen much of this destructive vibration since my haul destinations invariably entail off-roading. Lower straps go to bumper structure and upper straps go to overhead cargo rack.
After 4 years and many dozens of transports I recently drilled new larger round pivot holes and increased diameter of Grade 8 pivot bolts to start fresh and have more bearing surface area for future wear. An option could have been installing bushings rather than simply larger pivot bolts.
These carriers certainly are customizable. I re-welded the 2" receiver tube to : 1) bring bike closer to haul vehicle & . 2) lower carrier so my Tacoma's camper door can fully open.
 

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So my assumption is this won't work on a pickup truck due to the rear lights being obstructed???? I have a brand new Ford Raptor and don't want to load it into the bed every time, so was looking at a hitch carrier, either hydralic like this (preferred) or the ones you roll the bike up on to. Any help/advice would be appreciated...
 

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Hello TitanFlyer and welcome to the group.

I use an aluminium rack on the back of my Town & Country van and to avoid the issue with obstructing the rear lights I simply added a set of aftermarket trailer lights onto the carrier and plug them into the same light harness that my trailer plugs into.

Here is a picture of it....

TW_Rack_2.jpg
 

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Hello TitanFlyer and welcome to the group.

I use an MotoJack carrier on the back of my van and to avoid the issue with obstructing the rear lights I simply added a L.E.D. strip light onto the carrier and plug them into the same light harness that my trailer plugs into.

Beware any attempts to label any device, or video as "ultimate" since those subjective claims seem pretentious and invariable erroneous.

The Raptor does have a relatively high bed but putting the bike in a pick-up bed in my opinion remains the safest, securest, cheapest, most efficient means of motorcycle transport.
 

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The Raptor does have a relatively high bed but putting the bike in a pick-up bed in my opinion remains the safest, securest, cheapest, most efficient means of motorcycle transport.

Thanks, Miaugi and Fred....


I totally agree that would be the best way to do it, but my mission requirements are to have a family in the Raptor on the way to our weekend place up in the mountains. This would require the covered bed to hold all of our crap for the weekends and the bike just wouldn't fit in there, plus the roll up cover currently being installed takes up some space at the front of the bed. I really like the idea of a hitch carrier, especially the hydralic one that makes it an easy one man job.
 

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Understand now the Raptor pick-up bed's dedicated use so some other form of carrier or trailer certainly makes sense.
My open pick-up is a great two bike hauler but only goes on day trips. Like you any over-nighter comes with too much gear.
I really like my hydraulic carrier over a my simpler much less expensive ramp style, primarily since I don't inadvertently walk into it as frequently once the bike is unloaded. Plus it makes a work stand for the bike a camp.
However one more unmentioned minor downside is after thousands of miles of hauling the serrated sharp points on the footpegs are getting worn down by the foot peg restraining clamps.
Oddly enough both styles of carrier seem equally vulnerable to high centering or dragging while crossing dips and low spots.
 
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