TW200 Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone ride in Wharton State Forrest in NJ? I have a TW200 and tried once to ride in the sandy trails near Batsto and found it very difficult. I don’t know if it would be easier with a bigger bike like a WR250R. Of course I know I also need to learn technique for sand. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
Does anyone ride in Wharton State Forrest in NJ? I have a TW200 and tried once to ride in the sandy trails near Batsto and found it very difficult. I don’t know if it would be easier with a bigger bike like a WR250R. Of course I know I also need to learn technique for sand. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Its hard to ride deep sand no matter what you ride. I have a TW and a Husqvarna 701 (12" race suspension 80HP) and ride Wharton most weekends. I can give you some pointers; Speed is your friend, butt way back on seat, no deathe grip on the bars. Gently roc bars left and right and inch or two holding them loosely. If you feel like your gonna go down, quickly goose the throttle and the bike will stand right back up if your butt is far enough back and your not too tight on the bars. Only 10% max of your weight should be on the seat though, keep your weight on the pegs moving the weight from peg to pegs as it can and will help you steer up and out of or through ruts. Practice and a big set help too. Deep sand can be scary no matter the bike or the rider. If you are gonna be down there let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,348 Posts
Its hard to ride deep sand no matter what you ride. I have a TW and a Husqvarna 701 (12" race suspension 80HP) and ride Wharton most weekends. I can give you some pointers; Speed is your friend, butt way back on seat, no deathe grip on the bars. Gently roc bars left and right and inch or two holding them loosely. If you feel like your gonna go down, quickly goose the throttle and the bike will stand right back up if your butt is far enough back and your not too tight on the bars. Only 10% max of your weight should be on the seat though, keep your weight on the pegs moving the weight from peg to pegs as it can and will help you steer up and out of or through ruts. Practice and a big set help too. Deep sand can be scary no matter the bike or the rider. If you are gonna be down there let me know.
You hint at it, "keep your weight on the pegs". Stand in sand.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
Another thing often forgotten is to grip the bike with your knees. Also balance is crucial. You can go as slow as your ability to balance in sand allows and that's why weight on the pegs helps so much. However once your ability to balance becomes awesome you will find yourself becoming comfortable with sitting more. When my knees are acting up I find myself sitting much more and still outriding the fear that always rides with you when in deep sand. All advice aside it's practice, experience and crucially the right tires that help the most. You will inherently develop your own technique. The problem with Wharton is some roads are 20 plus miles strait of deep sand and that will wear you down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys! Do you think the wide tire of the TW200 is an advantage in sand compared to a thinner tire like a Wr250r? My tread/nuns are a little worn (still pass street inspection). Would new tires help in sand?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,046 Posts
I've tried wide and narrow. End of day its big widely spaced TALL knobs that make the most difference. A wide front tire without widely spaced tall knobs and you need great balance in deep sand.. and don't be trying to lay it over in turns with a wide bald sled of a tire without side knobs or you will actually lay it over. I have a new front knobby ready to install, once I get to it i'll let you know.. Here's a PIC:

This is the type of tire you want in the front in deep sand (pic):

It's very good on the road too (on other bikes I have). Once I test it on the TW i'll give more info.
Knobs are very close on the edge (good on pavement), spreed and weight rating is fine etc.. But the center three rows are tall and well spaced. Tires make a huge difference. You need a tire that matches the riding you do.

SO yes, it's a rear tire BUT it's knobbed like a front tire.

s-l1600 (1).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,170 Posts
Who makes this tire? I wouldn’t mind trying one on the BW to see how it does in the mud.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top