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Just sold my 400EXC KToom and now need a dual sport, the TW looks like a hoot, I've got a Yamaha quad that seems pretty much indistructable so I guess I'll dive in.
 

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Just sold my 400EXC KToom and now need a dual sport, the TW looks like a hoot, I've got a Yamaha quad that seems pretty much indistructable so I guess I'll dive in.
deadguy,
This is one of those things that, in my opinion, is fairly subjective. We had two TW's a few years ago and, well, while they were fun little toys back then, they did not fit the bill for our intentions due to them being too small for decent street driving but did ok for mild off roading. But, that was several years ago. I've aged even more (duh!!) and, I have a Honda GL 1800 Goldwing for the street. But, I wanted something to zip around on for small runs here and there. Long story short, I started out looking at the Honda Monkey bike. Toooooooo expensive out the door. Next up, the Suzuki VanVan. Also too expensive out the door. Both of those have little to absolutely ZERO used ones anywhere. So, that left something I was familiar with, the Yamaha TW200.

I started looking and, within a couple days, I'd found plenty of them on C/L. We ended up getting an '07 with 582 miles on it. It had a rough younger life. The previous owners tore stuff off of it, laid it over on the right side and broke off the right rear turn signal and the hand brake lever. And there was more damage. But, I got it for about the best price possible and, I've been nurturing it back to life in the last week or so. It's now in SERIOUSLY better shape than it was. I'm awaiting a new stock rear sprocket and chain. I've already got the stock front one. It's way too low geared right now with a 60T rear sprocket. We'll see how much different it is with a set of stock gearing.

As for you and your intentions, well, remember, it's a fairly small bike, in terms of power and capabilities. Treat is as such, don't over use it, enjoy what IT will do for you within its realm of strengths, and you'll have a ball on it. I'm 66 years old and 6'2 1/2" tall and 240 lbs and, so far, I'm tickled with what it does with me on it. I've not done any off roading and don't plan on heavy duty off roading but, will occasionally scoot around on one or two of our local trails. If you cruise on over to youtube, you'll see all kinds of stuff about the infamous TW, riding it, working on it, modifying it, comparing it to the VanVan and more. Good luck.
Scott
 

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My TW200 is my first motorcycle. I love it. I'm 5'11" 170lbs, and the bike fits like a glove. I live in Northern Ontario, where the roads are notoriously bad and the Tdub just eats it up and tracks straight. I've had big mud trucks, lifted JEEP, fast cars and lowered truck. This is the most fun I've had in a long time, and it's only 13HP! Cheap insurance, great gas mileage, inexpensive parts and easy to work on. Never-mind the durability of these badboys.

The school I took my motorcycle safety course with, had 3 TW200s. They were all <2001 model year, because they had drum brakes. They must have been dropped on pavement, like 1000+ times since the school has had them, yet they're still running.

I may get a new bike in the future, but I won't get rid of my TW200!
 

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THe KLR 650 is my daily commute but I bought a TW200 cause I just liked the looks. I put a 45 tooth sprocket on the rear and it is smooth at 55 all day. I commute to workin about the same amount of time while not getting on the insanity that is highway 77 in CHarlotte, nc. SUPER fun bike and in South Carolina, I can wake up at sunrise and crise around the empty countryside with no helmet, the wind in my hair and just flip off the world. I love it.
 

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It's fun, easy to get around on, can go on trails and do some decent off-roading. Don't expect anything at high-speed. Like TeeDoubleUTwoHundred stated, I'll likely get another "bigger" bike, but I won't ever sell the TW. Good luck and have fun!
 

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When was the last time you could ride a bike wide open throttle... all the time? The TW seems to beg for it on pavement, down the mountain it won't hit 80, chin on dash and left hand on fork leg, but it will keep up with traffic going 50-55 up the mountain (which I felt was perfect and a bit surprising) and let you pass the laboring tractor trailers and buses. Absolute fun off pavement and on single track, without worrying that the right hand will get me into trouble too quickly... it doesn't do anything quickly. Puts me into a completely different mindset when I ride it. No big air, no wheelies over things... kinda like a 3/4 scale KLR... an underpowered, undersuspended primitive tractor that will go wherever you're willing. Low enough to easily dab a foot, light enough to pick back up alone when no amount of my skill less correction procedures save me... and when it goes down... you'll find you're just standing next to or over it. FUN... at a pace that shouldn't get you too wounded. Reminds me of bikes from the 70's, and with a design that hasn't changed in 30 plus years... there must be something inherent that makes everyone love it... just the way it is.
 

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YUP! You are in for moving over into the slow lane and staying there. A good running, well tuned and maintained TW is a great little bike for just getting out and around anywhere as long as you don't need a thrill in the seat of your pants. If you can accept it for what it is and understand there is not much you can do to make it all that much better then you have a winner. Concentrate all your upgrades on creature features that make it more comfortable for your needs and don't get too deep into more power options. If you buy a new one I would ride it around in your typical places for a while before I do much to make it better. We can help you spend lots of $$ on all sorts of nice upgrades but we can't help much to increase the power contained within the limits of the 12 HP motor. Many have tried and few have succeeded.

GaryL
 

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YUP! You are in for moving over into the slow lane and staying there. A good running, well tuned and maintained TW is a great little bike for just getting out and around anywhere as long as you don't need a thrill in the seat of your pants. If you can accept it for what it is and understand there is not much you can do to make it all that much better then you have a winner. Concentrate all your upgrades on creature features that make it more comfortable for your needs and don't get too deep into more power options. If you buy a new one I would ride it around in your typical places for a while before I do much to make it better. We can help you spend lots of $$ on all sorts of nice upgrades but we can't help much to increase the power contained within the limits of the 12 HP motor. Many have tried and few have succeeded.

GaryL
Gary,
Without a doubt, one of the most well written responses I've ever read, especially on here. Right to the point and on target for all points about the TW. In my opinion, for whatever that's worth, about the only way to try and obtain more power from a TW is to re-gear it. That is, simply change the sprockets. Just like we've done with 9 different Jeeps in a 35 year period, changing differential gears to a lower ratio or higher numerically, you'll achieve more power due to the better use of already available power. Well, you can do the same with a TW. Simply get a bit larger rear sprocket and that will give you a bit lower gearing for better use of the available power of the TW. Yes, you might loose a tad bit of top end but, it's a bit of a sacrifice. You determine what's important for your application.
Scott
 

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YUP! You are in for moving over into the slow lane and staying there. A good running, well tuned and maintained TW is a great little bike for just getting out and around anywhere as long as you don't need a thrill in the seat of your pants. If you can accept it for what it is and understand there is not much you can do to make it all that much better then you have a winner. Concentrate all your upgrades on creature features that make it more comfortable for your needs and don't get too deep into more power options. If you buy a new one I would ride it around in your typical places for a while before I do much to make it better. We can help you spend lots of $$ on all sorts of nice upgrades but we can't help much to increase the power contained within the limits of the 12 HP motor. Many have tried and few have succeeded.

GaryL
Gary,
Without a doubt, one of the most well written responses I've ever read, especially on here. Right to the point and on target for all points about the TW. In my opinion, for whatever that's worth, about the only way to try and obtain more power from a TW is to re-gear it. That is, simply change the sprockets. Just like we've done with 9 different Jeeps in a 35 year period, changing differential gears to a lower ratio or higher numerically, you'll achieve more power due to the better use of already available power. Well, you can do the same with a TW. Simply get a bit larger rear sprocket and that will give you a bit lower gearing for better use of the available power of the TW. Yes, you might loose a tad bit of top end but, it's a bit of a sacrifice. You determine what's important for your application.
Scott
 

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I think the TW is kind of like an adult mini-bike. Nearly anybody can ride it and it is a blast to ride. It's street legal and can go on the trails too. Lots of fun.
 
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