TW200 Forum banner

21 - 40 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
One thing you will find coming from a KLR is that the suspension isn't that great. Compounding the problem is that the bikes are shipped with too little oil in the forks, leading to bottoming. Look in the Technical Write-ups for info on the correct level for your weight, but as a benchmark a lot of us use 130mm. That is the only thing I would consider an "Achilles Heel". They are extremely reliable.

Of course you may consider some changes for your personal body type and riding style, like bar risers, wider footpegs, brush guards, a better seat, and so on. AND A SHINKO 241!!!

You can re-use the OEM filter for about 20 years and never ever have the dreaded "wrong filter in the right box" syndrome.
The info about too high torque values for the oil filter cover, the oil gallery check bolt, and the oil drain plug is right on!

I don't think the cannister delete will have any effect at all on performance and it only weighs about 6 ounces. It's a cosmetic decision.

It's a bike that going slowly on is more fun than going fast....smell the roses. ;)
Lol the KLRs factory suspension blows as well. I already got a 19kg/mm spring from ProCycle, but I haven't started researching the forks yet. I already got new taller bars, ims foot pegs, handguards, seat pad, and much more lol. What do you like about the Shinko 241? I am like a 50/50 street dirt rider, and I need something that can grip asphalt in the rain. Good to know the OEM filter is reuseable. I want to get rid of the charcoal cannister because it's one less potential issue I have to deal with. I haven't picked up my TW yet, so I don't know what I'm dealing with in regards to the cannister, but I just want it gone. Vapor lock is a PITA. Plus, on the CA model KLRs, the charcoal cannister was in a little metal box mounted to a unique-to-california bracket on the subframe, and once the cannister was gone, that little metal box was a GREAT place to keep a tool pouch!

EDIT: Ahh, I see the cannister is a much smaller hidden thing on the TW, and most people say it doesn't cause any issues. I suppose I will leave it on for now. And as I think about it more, I might be voiding the factory warranty by removing it.
The cannister on the KLR was behind this nice painted metal cover over by the rear rack. Had tons of potential uses once the stupid cannister was gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Shinko 241 does well in the rain. It is soft and has little sipes in it. I live in coastal BC. We do rain here.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SEADUB200

·
Registered
‘04 TW200, Jets+Shims, DGV2, S-moto fender, Acerbis Guards, ProTaper KX, JNS DOT LED BLK, Moose Rack
Joined
·
197 Posts
I’ve got a Shinko 700 up front, which I bought a few years ago just to get the dreaded Death Wing off the bike, but I’m rethinking that move due to it’s weight (heavy, as it’s classed as a rear) & concerns about wet pavement performance, which I haven’t experienced, but read several reviews by riders who have been bit by wet tarmac washouts.

Not a fan at all of the retro-trials bike look of the Shinko 241, but where what keeps you upright, in control & uninjured, in the widest variety of terrain is concerned, the smart man lets form follow function.

By that measure, the Shinko 421 is the winner by a wide margin among the majority of TW’ers with thousands of miles backing those opinions. Search. You will see.

It will likely be my next front tire.

(& a good front tire is ALWAYS cheaper than the cost of damage to you, or your bike).

I’d live with your brand new OE chain until you wear it out & put your $ toward that tire, 1st, especially if you plan to be off-road at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Hahaha hell yeah I do! I loved the crazy convos I had with other KLR owners.
You get far more than the "hey I have/had one of those too!" crowd. In fact, locally, I've only met one guy who owns a TW (works at Yamaha shop) and one who recognized it as a TW (took his MSF course on one). The other 599% of random encounters generally focus around "Gawwwwleee, I bet that there rear tire could get ya `bout most anywheres!". I had one guy follow me in his car for like 3 miles around town. I noticed he had been back there for a while and through some roundabout combinations of turns, so I pulled into a parking lot expecting a fight. He was just hoping I'd stop somewhere and wanted to ask me about the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
My advice would be to just ride the bike and figure out for yourself what you like about the bike, and what you think needs upgrading. Everyone is different, and so will recommend different mods. I've had mine about 9 months and have put about 3800 miles on it, and the only change I've bothered making is a bolt-on cargo rack. I still have the stock Death Wing, the little PW50 foot pegs, no risers... heck I even find the stock seat is reasonably comfortable for about two hours before I need to take a break. YMMV....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
I’d live with your brand new OE chain until you wear it out & put your $ toward that tire, 1st, especially if you plan to be off-road at all.
One potential problem with letting the chain wear is that as it "stretches" (actually rivet/hole wear), it will wear down both sprockets to match. Once the sprockets are worn, a new chain will not seat properly, and a $40 ten minute chain replacement becomes double (or triple) the cost and 5x the time as you discover the joy of rear sprocket bolt retainers and the captive front sprocket shaft.

If the money is there, do the chain and tire both right away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
One thing you will find coming from a KLR is that the suspension isn't that great. Compounding the problem is that the bikes are shipped with too little oil in the forks, leading to bottoming. Look in the Technical Write-ups for info on the correct level for your weight, but as a benchmark a lot of us use 130mm. That is the only thing I would consider an "Achilles Heel". They are extremely reliable.
What oil should we be using in the forks, as a new owner of a 2019 that will almost certainly be getting a load of suspension work because of my weight and use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,301 Posts
Thanks for asking this question. I'm a new owner as well (2021) with many questions and have found tons of answers here.
Welcome to the forum!

Marty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
443 Posts
@XVS650 has great advice. Ride it a little and get a feel for what works for you and what doesn't. Poke around the forum for a while and you'll notice that there are definitely certain upgrades that LOTS of guys do, because they just plain work.
As far as weak links like the doohickey, none really come to mind. After 34 years of production, Yamaha has it pretty well dialed.
With a KLR background, you'll feel pretty familiar with the TW. They are crude and heavy but more capable than most other riders would expect. They're a great place to start but really need to be tailored to the rider. You're only limited by your budget and imagination.

...and welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,640 Posts
What oil should we be using in the forks, as a new owner of a 2019 that will almost certainly be getting a load of suspension work because of my weight and use.
First, get the level correct. At 200, I've never had to change from the 10 wt. stock oil. Some folks have gone to 15 wt. My sequence would be: oil level first, then heavier or progressive springs, and only then oil weight. I think progressive springs would be the most important mod for people over 230 lbs.
 

·
Registered
‘04 TW200, Jets+Shims, DGV2, S-moto fender, Acerbis Guards, ProTaper KX, JNS DOT LED BLK, Moose Rack
Joined
·
197 Posts
One potential problem with letting the chain wear is that as it "stretches" (actually rivet/hole wear), it will wear down both sprockets to match. Once the sprockets are worn, a new chain will not seat properly, and a $40 ten minute chain replacement becomes double (or triple) the cost and 5x the time as you discover the joy of rear sprocket bolt retainers and the captive front sprocket shaft.

If the money is there, do the chain and tire both right away.
OP just bought a new bike, big bag of farkles & is holding off on a CycleRack, so I read that to mean he’s slowing his $ roll.

When I replace any worn chain, I replace sprockets by default. More work on the TW, yes. 200% 300% the cost of chain replacement alone? I’m not sure what the sprockets you buy are made of, or where you buy them.

Mine don’t double the cost of the job.

My only intent was that if, as seems clear, OP is @ point of starting to decide what makes the “buy now” list & what gets cut, I’d choose a new front tire before ditching the brand new chain.

Only one of those new parts can land you on your ass with a busted bike, a busted body & big bills.

If $ is no object, sure, stimulate the hell out of the aftermarket economy. Buy the list.

I didn’t get that impression - seemed like OP was taking a responsible crack at balancing wants & needs with a new bike purchase. Easy spending other people’s $. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I put an x-ring chain on right away, that plain chain had no place on this bike. O-ring is great too. Previous owner had already done some stuff like front suspension. I've mostly just been cleaning mine and doing routine maintenance and new owner learning about all the little parts and electrical, my kind of bike!!

What's the torque spec supposed to be for the oil screen plug?

My bike came with a whole set of stainless fasteners replacement kit. I think mine are solid so that's nice to not worry about. Are we talking the one oil filter cover bolt that's 10NM vs the other 2 that are 7NM?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
OP just bought a new bike, big bag of farkles & is holding off on a CycleRack, so I read that to mean he’s slowing his $ roll.

When I replace any worn chain, I replace sprockets by default. More work on the TW, yes. 200% 300% the cost of chain replacement alone? I’m not sure what the sprockets you buy are made of, or where you buy them.

Mine don’t double the cost of the job.

My only intent was that if, as seems clear, OP is @ point of starting to decide what makes the “buy now” list & what gets cut, I’d choose a new front tire before ditching the brand new chain.

Only one of those new parts can land you on your ass with a busted bike, a busted body & big bills.

If $ is no object, sure, stimulate the hell out of the aftermarket economy. Buy the list.

I didn’t get that impression - seemed like OP was taking a responsible crack at balancing wants & needs with a new bike purchase. Easy spending other people’s $. YMMV.
I am trying to maintain some level of self control, but I am going to tailor this bike to my needs fairly quickly. With the KLR, I was broke and it was a budget bike and mods were slow. This bike is a toy and money for these inexpensive mods is easy and I’m having a blast. So I will be replacing the chain and front tire sooner rather than later. And getting progressive springs. And an exhaust. And deleting the rear mud guard and changing out the taillight. And getting a kickstart kit if I can find a way to assemble the kit for <$250.

Meanwhile my 2020 Harley Fat Boy sits in the garage with it’s stock handlebars and exhaust cause on a Harley that’s a $1500+ job for EACH of those mods..
 

·
Registered
‘04 TW200, Jets+Shims, DGV2, S-moto fender, Acerbis Guards, ProTaper KX, JNS DOT LED BLK, Moose Rack
Joined
·
197 Posts
I am trying to maintain some level of self control, but I am going to tailor this bike to my needs fairly quickly. With the KLR, I was broke and it was a budget bike and mods were slow. This bike is a toy and money for these inexpensive mods is easy and I’m having a blast. So I will be replacing the chain and front tire sooner rather than later. And getting progressive springs. And an exhaust. And deleting the rear mud guard and changing out the taillight. And getting a kickstart kit if I can find a way to assemble the kit for <$250.

Meanwhile my 2020 Harley Fat Boy sits in the garage with it’s stock handlebars and exhaust cause on a Harley that’s a $1500+ job for EACH of those mods..
Right on, then! Have a blast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
What a rabbit hole of suspension optimization I just fell into reading about the ziptie drill.. I just need to figure out which set of progressive springs would give me the best starting point. I’m a solid 300# geared up. Gotta get that dialed in, sounds like I might bottom out the stock forks just sitting on the bike lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,577 Posts
welcome to the forum and where are you located? you might be sitting near fellow riders and can try their bikes to get a feel for how these can be dialed in for your personal preference.

ride on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
First, get the level correct. At 200, I've never had to change from the 10 wt. stock oil. Some folks have gone to 15 wt. My sequence would be: oil level first, then heavier or progressive springs, and only then oil weight. I think progressive springs would be the most important mod for people over 230 lbs.
Yep - the 10wt part is what I was looking for. Of course, I weight about 215, but I also ride with a pack on that weighs 20 pounds - when my racks get in, I'll move the tools in the pack to the tool carrier on the rack, but because I ride mostly trails or just raw woods the suspension takes a low speed beating. I want to check the oil levels for sure now that it's been brought up, but eventually my suspension tuning habits will kick in, and I'll take a stab at the springs and a rear shock. I've also got to sort out what the implications of carrying 5 gallons of fuel on the bike are - don't worry, it's not fuel for the bike - it's fuel for the machines I run to build MTB trails. Did I mention this bike would get a workout?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,970 Posts
What's the torque spec supposed to be for the oil screen plug?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,970 Posts
There are a couple of things to watch out for when buying a TW directly from the dealership. Firstly, these things turn up two to a crate, guaranteed, every time. So the mechanic takes a look, decides “sod that”, and gives the pre-assembly job to “Liitle Jim”, the workshop grunt

Here on this board, we primarily deal with TW’s day in, day out, but to the dealership they are toys with little mark up, and are so simple that the “big mechanic” has got better things to play with. Heck, a couple of bolts here and there, fill it with oil, get it out of my workspace. Grunt work

So the grunt does exactly that, and typically misses things. First up, look at the clutch cable, and follow it down to where it meets the left crankcase. The cable fixes to a lever, and on that lever is a return spring. This return spring is not attached in its final working position by the factory, relying instead to have it attached correctly once the bike is in use. In other words, Little Jim, who’s never seen a TW before, sees the spring, doesn’t realise it actually needs to be set up further, and hands the bike over with a “soft clutch”

We chew over this every now and then, but as new users come on board, they are often surprised - site https://www.tw200forum.com clutch return spring - Google Search

The next one makes perfect sense when you think about it, but this is “Little Jim” – tire pressure. Given that the humble TW has about as much suspension travel as your average hedgehog, most people just look at those big bulky tires, and think “Odd”. Think about it for a moment – if you were riding a hedgehog bareback, the last thing you’d do would be to make the ride as hard as possibly by pumping up the tires to bursting point

The TW is a bit like that, and a lot of the suspension is actually in the tires. The manual states “19 psi for riders up to 170 pounds” (or something like that). “Little Jim” knows better, and puts 24 psi front and back, just like always. Sure, if you have the TW201/203 road tires and are determined to go for the land speed record on a two valve thumper, pump them up and hope you never go over a bump. But if the bike is stock, with knobblies, tone it down a bit. Many of us run below 15 psi for the trails, and not much over for the road. Not all nuts are on the bike, some of them are on the rider, and just like crates of TW’s, they come in pairs

19 psi is your starting point, adjust to body weight and riding conditions from there in either direction, but don’t leave it up some grunt in the shop …….
 
21 - 40 of 54 Posts
Top