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I have had three previous TW 200 and sold them for various reasons - just bought a new 2017 and starting to ride again at age 70 (wife not too happy)

At my age I am not going to be doing aggressive riding and I will be riding in very warm temperatures - what do you wear for riding clothes. Also I like to walk a bit when I stop so hard core boots dont work.

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I wear a Aerostitch Roadcrafter suit & their Combat Touring boots.
the boots most definitely won't work well for long walks like more than a mile. The suit is well vented & offers a lot of storage & protection .
 
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A white or light colored vented jacket and white helmet help a lot in the heat. Check to see if you have a https://www.cyclegear.com/ near you anywhere. They have a pretty good selection of things.

Welcome to the forum!! :D
 

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I've been wearing a very old 2-piece Roadcrafter suit, which I replaced with a newer one for road riding some years ago.

I dug out my Alpinestar Enduro boots that have been sitting for the most part for the better part of a decade. The first clamp I went to secure broke - the plastic seems quite brittle now. I'm calling Alpinestar later today to see if replacement hardware is available, since the rest of the boot is in good shape. If not, I'll see what a shoe repair place can suggest for buckles or Velcro to get a few more years out of the boots.

As an aside, the suit - and boots - I'm talking about from a Baja trip in 2003:

 

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I like the Olympia Mesh Airglide 5 jacket and pants with CE internal armor in silver (pewter) and white: https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/olympia-airglide-5-jacket
And matching pants: https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/olympia-airglide-4-pants

They have waterproof removable liners so are good from about 50 to 100 degrees. For boots, I still wear heavy Sidi Adventure Rains. Good for about a mile or two of hiking once broken in. I feel that the most likely injury at the slow speeds I ride is to my feet, so I won't use lighter boots. I have been proven right by encounters with several hidden rocks in the sagebrush that would have broken toes or worse in lighter boots.
 

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I'm having difficulty staying safe and cool at the same time also. Even with the liner removed in my Viking jacket and all vents open in my helmet, i'm sweating if going <20mph.
 

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Next Adventure’s next adventure in Yuma Arizona would benefit from some of the modern mesh outfits since riding there tends to be a bit warmer than the Pacific Northwest. Their built in CE armor might reassure the wife too. Much cooler than conventional fabric jackets with vents.
I plan to keep wearing my Forma Adventure boots until I’m also seventy and they have to pry arthritic hands off the throttle. Those boots are so comfortable that I’ll happily clump around camp in them after a full day’s ride without complaint. Very supple buttery soft waterproof italian leather does not provide the protection of a full on MX boot but sure they are comfortable and safe for hiking that last bit to the mountain top or strolling along a lake shore.
 

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I've been wearing a very old 2-piece Roadcrafter suit, which I replaced with a newer one for road riding some years ago.

I dug out my Alpinestar Enduro boots that have been sitting for the most part for the better part of a decade. The first clamp I went to secure broke - the plastic seems quite brittle now. I'm calling Alpinestar later today to see if replacement hardware is available, since the rest of the boot is in good shape. If not, I'll see what a shoe repair place can suggest for buckles or Velcro to get a few more years out of the boots.

As an aside, the suit - and boots - I'm talking about from a Baja trip in 2003:

Very nice R100 GSPD. I have a 1995 Last Edition & have had a
ot of fun rides .
 

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From another Septuagenarian:
Justin 4762 boots (10" western style, very comfortable for hiking and made in the USA)
Wrangler jeans
Carhardt long sleeve T shirt
3/4 helmet (should sell my almost new Bell full face helmet, since I seldom wear it)
Kobalt TP18213 mechanics gloves
...work fine for me for casual exploring

Wife just wants to be advised of my route, so she knows where to pick up the body.
 

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For street I have a Klim vented jacket that is like being in a refrigerator when worn with a wicking shirt.
For pants, I use Rev it mesh pants. Both have upgraded armor.
For ADV or off-road, I have an Aerostitch Darien jacket and AD1 pants.
The Darien is also my rain jacket when paired with Frogg Toggs better pants.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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I ride and hike, fish or just hang out so I don't like to wear big riding boots all day. So I carry a pair of running/hiking shoes with me. I don't like to compromise with my feet/leg/ankles. My boots have probably saved my feet from being injured many times.

As for riding clothing, it gets warm here for half of the year. It's already in the 90s.
I have several ventilated textile jackets/pants with armor that I wear on road. A firstgear katmandu set and klim traverse set. I feel ok to about 90 degrees. Then it just depends on how much I'm working and how fast I'm going.

For off-road I use a fox titan armor jacket that flows air pretty well. I have worn it over a polyester shirt and been fine in 100 degree heat. Or I'll wear it with a jersey over it. I don't think it's rated for on road use.
There are various get wet and wear evaporation vests that work ok. I find they are a push because they will keep you a little cooler if you are moving but they are another layer you have on. I can feel the weight and more confined. And they are hot once the water is gone.

I like to feel like I'm somewhat protected. Riding in the heat will not be cool. It can be tolerable though.
 

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I don't know the temperature extremes in your area, but if you're Vancouver, you're probably in a high humidity zone like me. For dedicated protective gear that's effective, I would recommend looking for gear that is "mesh" - not textile or leather - that is within your budget. Under the mesh gear wear a moisture-wicking sports t-shirt and mid-thigh-length sports underwear as your base layers.

This setup provides several advantages:
  1. Even low quality mesh is superior to textiles for airflow and protection. Just make sure armor is positioned correctly over your joints to remain comfortable when riding.
    • Jacket - REV'IT! Eclipse Jacket is a great buy with decent armor and some color choices besides black.
    • Pants - REV'IT! Airwave 2 Pants are a great mesh pant that comes at an entry level price, but offers a lot of protection and sizing options.
  2. The sports shirt and underwear will keep you cool by pulling the moisture away from your body even in the humid climate.
  3. If you get caught in a rain storm, or wet crossing a creek, your gear and underclothes will dry pretty quickly, eliminating the damp, clammy feel left by regular fabrics.
For the other gear...
HELMET: Buy something that is COMFORTABLE. A lot of the guys here like the traditional helmet/goggles combo used with regular dirt bikes, but I find goggles uncomfortable because they crush my nose. I prefer helmets like Cycle Gear's Bilt Explorer Helmet because it has an internal drop-down sun-visor. But there's also the AFX FX-41 DS or the Bell MX-9 helmets that are well priced and have high ratings from users.

GLOVES: Again, buy something COMFORTABLE. I use Cycle Gear's Sedici Lucca Gloves. But do yourself a favor and find a motorcycle shop where you can try them on. I tried ordering several other brands that appeared to offer more protection, but they were super uncomfortable when I put them on. Chances are, if the glove hurts your hand, you're not going to wear it. So try on a variety of gloves. Just make sure they protect your knuckles at a minimum. I've seen what smacking your hand on pavement can do to knuckles - hello arthritis! Something to be avoided if possible.

BOOTS: I'm gonna be a broken record and state, buy something COMFORTABLE! LOL. If you like to hike, I recommend trying the Forma Adventure Boots in either the traditional high version, or low version. Almost universally, guys who wear these love how they offer great protection while on the bike, and are comfortable when hiking after they're broken in. If you find you don't like wearing these kind of boots to walk, go ahead and pack a pair of slip-on shoes that are comfortable for exploring. Just make sure you wear a good pair of high socks and you'll be good to go!

Hope some of these links help. There's a METRIC TON of gear out there, and choosing it is very personal based on style preference, riding conditions, and local weather situations. The gear that works for guys from dry, desert like climates won't necessarily be safe for guys in humid, rainy climates. The main thing is it's comfortable so you'll wear it, and armored to keep you safe.

Good luck and have fun!!!!!!
 

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Very nice write up Luv!! :)
 

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As LuvNot mentioned, the Rev'it Airwave II pants are what I have. They were comfortable throughout my last jaunt down South to the Dragon. When it rained, I slid on a pair of Frogg Togg's better pants. Perfect. I also have a pair of Tourmaster pants that I do not wear anymore since I got the Rev'its and AD-1's.

For superior hand protection, I prefer Held gloves. I have a vented pair that even worked fairly well in the rain.
Around town, I use a pair of Alpine Stars Masai vented gloves. They feel like not wearing gloves at all.
There are also two pairs of heated gloves in the closet. First Gear and Harley/Gerbing. Both work flawlessly. The First gear are waterproof, but breathable and quite warm. The Harley gloves are also very warm. I use them on the super cold winter days below 30 degrees. there are also random pairs of Harley gloves that have earned their keep. My peeve about gloves is that you cannot operate a phone to set the GPS, etc. with them. Even the Masai gloves have a sensitive area that is supposed to work, but does not. Going to have to mount a stylus near the phone.

Other heated gear includes a Harley/Gerbing vest and a Kanetsu inflatable heated vest from Aerostitch. I also have heated socks and pants liners. On the Southern trip, I carried the Kanetsu vest and the First Gear gloves. I was dry as a bone in downpours and toasty warm.

For boots... Off-road, there is a pair of Alpine Stars something or others. A little stiff, but offer good protection.
For ADV and trails I have a pair of Gaerne Oiled that I got from a member here. They are super comfortable. They are so nice, I hate to get them dirty. I wear them on the KLR when putzing around.
For the street I have a pair of Dianese Fulcrums. Did not even need break in. Put my favorite Red Wing insoles in them and they feel like I have owned them for 20 years.

Socks are Merino wool boot socks from Amazon. About 22 bucks a pair and worth three times that. My feet are never cold, hot, damp, nothing but dry no matter what the outside temp. Had two pair on the trip. Came back and ordered five more pair.

Helmets..
Off-road I use a Bilt Adventurer. Very comfortable, not expensive, great visibility and solid construction.
On road There is a Shoei Neotec modular with a fitted Sena 10U that is super comfortable, has great features, great visibility, very quiet. It is not cheap.
There, until recently, was a Shuberth C3Pro. Probably the best helmet ever made, and it sure costs like it is. Very comfortable, super quiet, great visibility. I only sold it because a friend could not find one (They are moving to the C4) and he offered me 1.5 times the list price for it. (I gave it to him). I hope the C4 is as comfortable and quiet, so I can spend almost 1k for a helmet again.

Underclothes/base layers
For warmth, you can't beat the "Freeze-Out" gear at CycleGear. I have a zippered shirt and pants. They are a perfect windproof layer that I use under my Klim jacket when it is under about 60 degrees, or if I am riding a bike without a windscreen below 70.

For cooling, I use Columbia wicking shirts. The ones with the tiny O's. They are amazing in their ability to move heat. Jockey or Russell wicking medium length briefs take care of the air conditioning downstairs.

It has taken me a fair bit of time to get all this stuff to where it works for me. I am very happy with what I have.

I hope to go look at the new BMW riding suit that has the variable pores that acts as a vented suit and also is rainproof. Gonna be some coin, but I like to pack light. Last trip carrying the Darien jacket was a chore in itself. It took up more room than my tent.

Sorry if I rambled.
 

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Nice write up Smitty!!


***I love it when members really go out of their way to take the time to write up quality answers to help members. ;)
 
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