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Worth watching.


GaryL
 

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There is another glue he did not test but also worth having around. PC-7 comes in 2 35MM film canisters and is very similar to JB Weld. I have had fabulous results with it and used it on a part over 20 years ago and it is still strong as can be today.

GaryL
 
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Impressive.

The only thing I could add is when watching the "wood" presentation the Gorilla Glue didn't look like it was applied very well, evenly or hardly at all. Wood is supposedly that glue companies forte. Now of course they have (almost all of them) specific applications for specific materials. I was in my local True Value Hardware store the other day and saw 6-8 different type of Gorilla with an equal amount of eye-catching packaging and applicators. And of course "The Original" that works on everything-type used in the video.

Better or is it just another ploy in the endless marketing & advertising business selling you "what you need"?
Suppose the same at whatever else in life you are sold or told you need, HaHa.

Been a JB Weld guy for a long time. But I rarely use it on wood. Might rethink that. Mixing the glue and catalyst does create some waste because you never want to mix less than you need so you invariably make a little more more. Timed application.

Some other "Glue Experts", RIP Penny Marshall:

 
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With any glue we use the proper preparation of the surfaces to be glued is most important. He did a lousy job in a few instances in the video. Gluing the boards end to end I would have used a finger joint and Titebond 2 and would bet the boards would break somewhere other than the glue joint. I tried the Flex glue spray on my rain gutters where they were joined together end to end with a seam and it was a complete waste of time and money. Plastics are extremely hard to glue simply because there are so many different varieties of plastic and we rarely ever know what type we are gluing. I had a 5 gallon bucket I tried the Flex Tape on and it did repair the crack OK but after I filled it with water it took about 2 days for the tape to fail.

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That PL polyurethane is good stuff, have used it for years. 3m 5200 is another great sealant. Made for marine it works great for gutter seams, and thru hull water tight.
 

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With any glue we use the proper preparation of the surfaces to be glued is most important. He did a lousy job in a few instances in the video. Gluing the boards end to end I would have used a finger joint and Titebond 2 and would bet the boards would break somewhere other than the glue joint. I tried the Flex glue spray on my rain gutters where they were joined together end to end with a seam and it was a complete waste of time and money. Plastics are extremely hard to glue simply because there are so many different varieties of plastic and we rarely ever know what type we are gluing. I had a 5 gallon bucket I tried the Flex Tape on and it did repair the crack OK but after I filled it with water it took about 2 days for the tape to fail.

GaryL
Or ends together with at least dowel rods, splines or biscuits.
 

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I have a box of the "double bubble" epoxy packets, kind of like ketchup packets. Both resin and hardener in separate packets, but attached to each other. You fold them over, cut off a corner, and squeeze out what you need (often all of it, but not always).
After having used it a bunch of times, I'm comfortable and confident working with it, and I've used it on a lot of different materials. Works very well. But like Gary said, surface prep is key.

As an aside, I helped out a buddy with a gutter cleaning business some years ago. He had a spray can product which was some kind of rubber, and he had it in white and silver colors. We'd use that on ends and corners inside the gutters where the home owner said it was leaking. Had to be shaken really well, and you usually ended up using the whole can (it would clog after that first use). That stuff worked very well. It built up a coating that flowed into and sealed the seams in the gutter seams. Ugly looking, but it was inside the gutter where we sprayed it, and it stayed flexible enough to maintain the seal. Might have been an early version of Flex-Seal.
 

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Thanks Gary. I'll be watching his youtube channel for other tests.
 

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Thanks Gary. I'll be watching his youtube channel for other tests.
He did a real good one with Sea Foam I posted here a while back. Worth going to look that one up.

GaryL
 

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Yes, his SeaFoam one was good. Now I remember where I saw him from.
 

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The adhesive should be matched to the substrates joined as well as the expected stresses in the anticipated service life , things like flexure, impact, UV resistance, dishwasher safe, etc. A good bond requires more than just simple adhesion . Excellent epoxies like JBWeld are brittle and inelastic, however there are several plastic epoxies with greater modulii of elasticity that are good matches for joining some polymers.
Surface prep is a science in itself. Brilliant research chemist & forum member Boarder255 once entertained me to a campfire dissertation on polymer surface prep that addressed the issue on a molecular level primarily with thermal and/or chemical de-polymerizers that make some plastics accept penetration by adhesives and surface coatings like the seemingly molded-in printing & colors on modern plastic products. Very informative with the conclusion that for the average Joe roughening up surfaces making micro-keyways for shear resistance and flame treatment to prep surface for adhesion were our best options with non-toxic materials at hand.
Of note is in the video the JBWeld seemed inadequately mixed, perhaps even better performance would have been achieved had another minute or two of mixing been performed. Film thickness and its effect on adhesive strength for the various test mediums in the video was also not addressed. All in all a good video for a casual evaluation of common popular glues.
 
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That PL polyurethane is good stuff, have used it for years. 3m 5200 is another great sealant. Made for marine it works great for gutter seams, and thru hull water tight.
I worked for 34 years in a Glue Factory... The key to using adhesives is to use the proper product for your application... Regular old fashioned wood adhesive works better than epoxy for bonding wood. As for 5200, it is an awesome product. It's both a sealant and an adhesive. Most people don't know that it's made in colors, too. But don't use it on anything that you'll ever need to disassemble... It is permanent...
 

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I use JB Weld quite a bit when repairing printers. Since JB Weld takes all night to set up I use hot glue to hold the pieces in place. The next day I remove the hot glue and my job is done.
One example is the Epson 3880 printer. The carriage breaks and if I had to replace the carriage the price would exceed a new printer. I have probably repaired ten printers with JB Weld and hot glue. With the repair and PM I make $190 and I have never had one fail.
 

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Very interesting and entertaining youtube channel. Thanks Gary.
 
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