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It's even worse or maybe better, with a 4.1 gallon Clarke tank. After installation I wanted to mark the level in gallon increments. I dumped in the first gallon and it almost didn't show on one side. I had to shake the bike from side to side to evenly distribute the gas across the hump. That can leave you with 1/2 or even 3/4 of a gallon reserve reserve.
 

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Something is up with that kicker. Looking straight down mine aligns with the case cover. It shouldn't stick out like that. Can you push it in by hand? Maybe the boss stops are tweaked?
 

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When I put in the Cogent fork kit I discovered I had a center detent position to my steering.

When I put in the All Balls bearing kit I tore out a lead on one of my heated grips.

When I put on the replacement grip heating elements, I needed to insulate the left side to better match the heat left to right.

The LED bulbs for the turn & running lights arrived today. When I put them in... well, nothing they just worked. No diodes, no resisters and no wiring mods. Polarity independent bulbs and a solid-state flasher are the way to go for a plug and play LED solution.

Afterwards, I got in a 28mi smokeless ride in the desert. Couple more of those and I'll re-torque the steering stem. BTW, while the top All Balls bearing does sit a bit higher and prevent the ring nut from engaging as many threads as the stock bearing, factory torque spec for the ring nut is only 4.4 ft-lbs. The stem bolt is taking the load @ 65 ft-lbs. No danger of the ring nut failing if everything is torqued to spec. In fact, the thread engagement of the ring nut was plenty to comfortably exceed the factory recommended 27 ft-lbs to seat the bearings.

Got home and my rear tire is looking a little worn, sheesh, will it never end?
 

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Geared up for a ride today only to discover a rear flat when doing the walk-around. Thought I'd take the opportunity to swap out the rear rather than repair and remembered I had an untested groover sooo...

Before.
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Automotive tire Tread


After
Tire Wheel Bicycle tire Automotive tire Tread


It's all just a winter experiment. Circumferentially, there are 10 rows of blocks. Counting out from the centerline in both directions, I grooved rows 1 thru 3. The goal was to increase the number of edges but avoid generating corners less than 90° and too small blocks both of which could be high wear points. Some of the blocks ended up smaller than I'd like but like I said, it's an experiment. I could have siped the center blocks, they're big enough but wanted to try just grooving first. The center block grooves are backwards, that is they channel loose debris towards the center of the tire. Not optimal. Grooving probably ain't going to increase life but I'll see if it provides a noticable increase in traction. I'll mount it in the next couple of days.
 

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Well, nuts! It hit 70° here and I tried to go for a ride only to discover the rear was flat, again. On the other hand, it was great weather to change a tire! Evidently the Quadboss didn't do it's thing properly or maybe the bike is just being ornery because I hadn't ridden in 3 weeks. Anyway, it gave me a chance to throw on the new custom grooved & siped TW34 and install a new tube. I submerged the old tube in the tub and located the leak square in the tread area. I cut open the tube and there was plenty of Quadboss coating the entire inside of the tube including the spoke side so I don't know why it didn't squish out and seal the 3/16" puncture. And it was very easy to clean up with just water.

Everything is back together and the sun is down. There's another shot of Quadboss in the new tube. (What's the definition of insanity?) I'm prone to give things two chances to disappoint me before moving on. In preparation, I already have a big bottle of the ATV flavor of RideOn to try next. Now, If I can just get out and ride this weekend.
 

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Repaired the carnage from Moab...
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber


Took this opportunity to try the trailer wheel mod...
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Vehicle Motor vehicle


Even though I'm a desert dweller I went with a galvanized wheel and planned to paint it black. Dropped it and the hub off at a local machine shop and told them, "THIS has to go through the center of THAT!", and left the HOW up to them. They called me a couple days later and wanted to know what kind of wheel that was because it nearly burned their shop down! OK, I might be exaggerating a bit. They decided that torching & grinding were the quickest way to notch the wheel and learned the hard way that galvanizing can burn. No real damage done other than a very ugly wheel, but the shop owner felt so bad that he offered to paint the wheel for free. The end result sure came out nice looking but now it's covered in desert dust!

The tire is a Sunf A033 in 25x8x12. I started at the manufacturer's recommended ATV minimum of 14 psi and was impressed with it's quick response transitioning side to side on pavement but it's 6 ply and was too stiff in the dirt. I'm down to 6 psi now and it's pretty good but I want to try lower. Then I realized my gauges all start at 5 psi. Amazon will deliver a couple Milton 2 - 20 psi gauges in a couple of days.

I also installed a 54 tooth rear sprocket. 55mph comes up quicker now even though the Sunf is a little taller than stock.

A big boy, 19kg/mm spring went it around the shock too. Stock appears to be progressive wound, didn't know that. Even though I'm just under 200lbs, the new spring feels better in the rocks. It does highlight the inadequacy of stock damping though. MSS or Cogent next.

I ditched the x-ring DID chain and went with a standard Protaper MX chain to see if 1) the power savings due to less frictional losses was noticeable and 2) just how quickly will a quality, standard chain stretch. The bike does seem quicker now but I've made too many changes all at once to blame it on the chain. So now the only thing left is to see how long it will last in a sandy environment.
 

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I didn't notice the damage until part way through the White Rim Trail. The wheel was still round and there was no weird vibration. I think I damaged the rim on the way out of the Hey Joe Mine the day before. The WRT is a looooong ride and after noticing the damage, I had rim-anxiety the rest of the ride, expecting it to let loose at any minute but it held. In fact, I ran Hell's Revenge and Slick Rock trails the next day with it like that.
 

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The center blocks & one row out from center are primarily tasked with driving and braking. You want their grooves to be perpendicular to those forces to increase the number of long biting edges.

The third row out from center gets into that realm where sideways forces become the major player. Those grooves should be parallel to rotation and perpendicular to the wheel sliding sideways to increase the number of long biting edges in the direction of saving your butt.

IMHO.
 
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