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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just stumbled upon this. Though I don't own one of these, like this fellow, I ride alone and am about the same age. No finger wagging, but sometimes a reminder and reality check can keep us a bit safer. Given the location, surprised he had cell reception. A backup device (spot/personal location beacon) ----- might merit some thought. Take care..
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Boy, that sucks. I could happen to any of us.
Roger that.

As Gerry said, backup emergency location device(s) should be a serious consideration. One could see how such a device would be extremely useful even if you were riding with a friend. That fellow on the Rokon was stuck real good. He could have been stuck real bad, and even with a friend along, the friend may not have been able to extract him... Friend is now forced to ride back for help. This creates potential for things to get worse.

Also, always file a flight plan. m.
 

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Oh man is that scary!! Generally i ride alone and most everywhere i go im in deep doodoo if i go off the downside of the trail. Generally no cell service, so ive actually been wondering about some sort of satelite texting device. The reviews on the spot seem "spotty" at best hahah. Any recomendations?
 

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My two cents,

This is the reason everybody who ventures off of the beaten path should be WEARING a small backpack of their choosing. Any and all life saving/preserving equipment should be inside the pack. I will spare the details of what I would select and just say bring the essentials for the areas/terrain that YOU ride in.



Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Personal locator beacons and Spot/Delorme devices are very different in terms of transmit power and features. For many years, when using my Spot, I have opted to pay extra for automatic tracking at 10 minute intervals. At my slow pace, that does leave lots of territory to search should I not come home some evening, but far better than leaving folks to guessing which direction you may have decided to go. Then of course, there is always the 911 button. Significantly better than having nothing and waiting for someone to just happen by. Last year just decided to hedge my bet and went and purchased a Personal Locator Beacon. No frills, but five watts of emergency transmit power. Should I be in a situation like the Rokon rider, I would use my Spot first. If no help arrived for what seemed a long period of time, the PLB would be activated. If the emergency seemed life threatening, the PLB would be used first. Thats my plan anyway.
<font size="3">[video]https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/personal-locator-beacons.html[/video]
 

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I have back country snowmobieled and cycled a lot, sometimes alone. My buddies laugh at my "kit" sometimes, but I have never had to much stuff with me when off road and broken down or stuck (several times not enough, another story). I have had a couple of friends severley hurt when alone. Both were very close to a road, but in a "ditch" not visible. Both lived, but spent hours incapacitated, unable to move before being found and or able to crawl to the road. I still ride alone a bit, but man am I careful! The one buddy credits living to being in full MX gear, as he took a deer to the chest at 25mph. He had multiple rib fractures and was unconcious for at least 30 minutes and in a ditch for several hours right along side his 2 day old XR250l.
 

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One thing that really surprised me when watching Rick's video of the Green Ridge ride was how difficult it was to see me or the bike when I ran off the road. If I had been alone and severely injured, I could have been there - within spitting distance of the road - and might have been completely missed by everyone riding past, even though I was wearing the neon safety yellow gear, due to the way the bank dipped back down on the other side of the little ridge. That whole experience just reinforced for me how riding alone could go very wrong.
 

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When that happened to me, my leg trapped under the TW was broken and the foot was pointing backwards. I used my elbows to pull against the bike to stretch the leg while rotating my body until the foot was pointed the right direction. I do not remember how I got the leg out from under it. Probably because of the pain. I do not remember how I got the TW upright but I did and with the kickstand deployed. I do remember pulling myself up using the TW with my hands. I lifted the broken leg over the bike and settled painfully into the saddle. Then the Miracle happened. I touched the starter and it fired right up. I low geared it down the trail for about half a mile until I hit a jeep trail. I then motored the 25 miles back to civilization. Xrays showed the broken bone and the fact that I had reset it correctly. They sent me home in a cast with a good supply of pain pills,(oxycodone).
And instructions to stay off the leg for 5 or six weeks. This happened in the Olympic Forest out of Reach of cell phone service and alone. It was the only way that I could prevent being bear food. There are some risks to riding alone.
BTW, I was a youthful 64 years old when this occurred. I am now closing on 73 and could probably not do it Again. Especially with my partly paralyzed legs.
 

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Normally the older we get the more cautious we become. When I first bought my TW I discovered some serious off-Road trails here in Harford county. I used better judgment and waited until I had a buddy to explore it with.
 

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TopPredator; said:
Normally the older we get the more cautious we become.
I'm waiting for this phenomenon to kick in...
Me too I'm waiting, though there are signs I should exercise some caution.
 

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My two cents,

This is the reason everybody who ventures off of the beaten path should be WEARING a small backpack of their choosing. Any and all life saving/preserving equipment should be inside the pack. I will spare the details of what I would select and just say bring the essentials for the areas/terrain that YOU ride in.



Tom
I agree whole heartedly. I generally carry enough to bandage most minor gashes and spend two nights (however uncomfortably) My worry is that ill be incapacitated enough to be unable to access or use my supplies. Looking over the edge on most of the logging roads around here is enough to give me butterflies. Reason and good sense tell me to be cautious when im alone, but as per usual i was power sliding around corners making my way back from bear hunting tonight. Two people knew my general location, but thats not near good enough in the event of a real emergency. Im thinking the spot with emergency text could be my next purchase.
 

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Im thinking the spot with emergency text could be my next purchase.[/QUOTE]

That's Spot on advice, listen to your inner voice and get it now! It's kind of like people saying "I would like to have a burglar alarm system" they are only motivated to buy after they are robbed. I also keep a first-aid kit with me when I ride and needed it on the Green Ridge ride. I took a big hunk of skin off the tip of my finger while putting my chain back on. I was bleeding like a stuck hog and needed a band-aid to stop the bleeding.
 
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