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Discussion Starter #1
There's one for a good price about two hours from me that looks to have been well cared for. Anything in particular to look for beyond the normal signs of abuse, crashes, etc.?
Keep in mind I have almost zero experience on anything but a Ruckus, so likely won't be able to test drive it as I forgotten how to shift gears ...
:shocked:
 

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Look for any obvious damage/abuse. After that, if you're not comfortable riding, ask the seller to ride it so you can hear the shifts, general engine noise, etc... If it sounds like a "normal" bike shifting and running I'd say you're good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks rbm. I know it's kinda pathetic to be a 61-year-old guy who can only ride a twist-and-go ... Gotta learn somehow.
 

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Thanks rbm. I know it's kinda pathetic to be a 61-year-old guy who can only ride a twist-and-go ... Gotta learn somehow.
Not pathetic at all, you've made up your mind, now it's time to learn. With your attitude, you'll pick it up quickly and enjoy the hell out of it!
 

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I know it's kinda pathetic to be a 61-year-old guy who can only ride a twist-and-go .
Not at all Bill. Find one you like, go slow, have fun and enjoy the scenery. They are wonderful and forgiving little bikes. Life is very good, look for the fun and enjoy the minutes. From where I stand looking 61 ain't exactly old at all.
 

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Wait till you hit 65 ... :p
 

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you can tell everyone that you are 16 and need a dirt bike (16 and 61 have the same digits) . I'm the same age, us teenagers have fun with our dirt bikes, we 'll get trikes when we get old.
 

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If it has any miles at all you'll be looking at chain and sprockets shortly--don't hold that against the purchase. If you use a ringed replacement chain it's a once every 20,000 miles job. Other than that, TWs have no vices. That said, I always plan on a complete service on any used vehicle I buy, even if the seller has receipts for a recent service. That means purchasing a shop manual and reading and following the instructions. The first service might take a newby a couple days, but that time will be shorter and shorter as time goes by. I can now do a complete service on a stock TW in under an hour.
 

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Get on it and drive it.
I can't imagine anything that's easier to get on, start, and get underway. Have the seller give you a demo, and have at it.
When I put Diane on hers for the first time, I didn't even have her give it any gas, just clutch, stomp on the gearshift, and SLOWLY let the clutch out.
Immediate giggles and grins.
It'll give you something to smile about on that 2 hour drive home.
Good luck!
 

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Okay, I gave bad advice about purchasing a shop manual. You can download a shop manual for free from this forum, along with the supplement for newer models.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks OWT! I happened to take my kayak and fly rod up to Davis Lake near Wickiup this morning, and lo and behold, there was a TW200 in the campground. Owner says he just loves the thing. I took it as an omen -- that and the otter I saw.

:cool:
 

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Wear a high pair of hunting boots the first few times out so you don't twist an ankle saving a fall. Start out in a field going slow and learning the clutch and shift thing. Set a couple of cones about 12 feet apart and learn to do figure eights around them with your feet on the pegs. Once you have that drill mastered then you progress to some mild trails to get the feel of some ruts and rocks. If on a trail you come upon a down tree or branch you always hit it straight on at a 90 degree angle to glide over it. If you hit them on an angle your front wheel will follow it and toss you off.

Just hit 62 here but have been a dirt rider for a long time and missing it for the past 20 years. Hate to say it this way but the TW is a perfect Senior Cycle and the apple of my eyes. I can be at the far back trout holes that I never would have walked in to in just a few minutes on my Dub. Not sure how a long fly rod will do but I have 3 and 4 piece ultra light set ups with 4 pound test line and it is a complete blast when you hook a nice 20 inch brown or rainbow. With a TW and some saddle time you will find you don't even need a trail or road as long as the woods are not too dense. I can pick my way through a hard wood forest that the streams and rivers go through and get to the places where the best fishing holes rarely see a fisherman.

Enjoy!

GaryL
 

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Take the Class

Keep in mind I have almost zero experience on anything but a Ruckus, so likely won't be able to test drive it as I forgotten how to shift gears ...
:shocked:
I'm surprised no one else has mentioned classes here, so I will: My wife and I took the ABATE motorcycle safety class last August. We're both around 60. One of our teachers was a woman in her 70's, who rode a big bike in real life. They start out from the very beginning, assuming only that you have a drivers' license and can ride a bicycle. By the end of the weekend class (in Colorado anyway) you've got a card to take into the DMV to get your motorcycle endorsement, and you're a pretty competent rider, for a beginner, although you've not gotten off the parking lot and into real traffic yet. Get on Google and see what you can find in your area.
 

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We got off on a tangent on Bill's riding abilities, or lack thereof, and that's fine - I posted something on that subject myself. But, though a newbie, I'm looking to get a second TW for my wife (actually it will probably be mine and she'll get the 2013 we got last fall) and interested in the original question: What should I look (and listen) for to determine the condition of a used TW? In particular, qwerty, above said "If it has any miles at all you'll be looking at chain and sprockets shortly". I'm not going to take that literally, so, how many miles is "any at all"? How can one tell when they need replacement?
 

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qwerty, above said "If it has any miles at all you'll be looking at chain and sprockets shortly". I'm not going to take that literally, so, how many miles is "any at all"? How can one tell when they need replacement?
Though this can vary by quite a bit due to driving conditions (dirt/pavement), and care, I replaced my original sprockets and stock chain around 8,000 miles. They were quite worn by then. Can't say when I "should" have replaced them as I wasn't paying that much attention to wear. I do now.

Left is my old sprockets with the tsnumami wave curl effect. Stretched chain caused is what I've been told. New sprockets are on the right.
 

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Great comparison pick of new and dangerously worn sprockets, Admiral.

If the stock chain is not anally cleaned and lubed it can be toast in under 2000 miles. The original on the Pirate was neglected, ridden on a farm, and was toast at 1700 or so miles. Admiral shows an example of a well cared for stock chain--8000 miles is a long life for such a crappy chain. Some people would rather wrench than ride, so they are happy with the stock chain. Those who would rather ride than wrench would be better off swapping to a ringed chain and tossing the stocker off a brand new TW. A ringed chain for a TW runs about 1/4 the cost of the 3 stock chains, gaskets, sprockets, seals, and lock tabs a single ringed chain will outlast.
 
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