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Discussion Starter #1
New member from California here. Forgive me if this has been answered somewhere else but I've searched all over...



As I look around for my first TW200 (upgrading from a KTM 950 :) there are two questions I'm struggling to answer:



1) What model year did the TW200 become 50-state?



20 What emissions gear is visible so I can confirm that a bike is 50-state?



Thanks, guys. Good forum!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Look for a charcoal canister in front of the engine. Mounted to the frame.
That thing on the downtube? Oh. Nice kludge by Yamaha. :)



Any idea what year they started putting those things on all the US bikes? Or do they still make 49-staters?
 

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Cali-legal bikes will have the canister, or if it's been removed the bracket will be there, and the (Cali-only) tank will have a nipple for the evap hose on the forward left underside. Stock Cali bikes are jetted slightly leaner.



I have no idea when or if they have gone 50 state, all mine are Cali bikes. Perhaps someone with a new bike from another state will tell us if it has a canister.



It's totally passive (only contains fumes from floatbowl and tank) but you'll need a bike born with it to register it in Cali, AFAIK. I don't think B.A.R. will allow you to retrofit it.
 

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I have a 2010 in Massachusetts and it has no canister. The owners manual that came with it says "TW200Z" and "TW200ZC" on the cover. I assume "C" is for California.
 

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They make two different bikes. One is a 49 state legal bike and the other is a California legal bike. The previous posts are correct about the canister and gas cap. And yes, they will be designated with a "C" in their name.
 

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The C bikes are jetted richer than the 49-state bikes, not leaner. Not as rich as the bikes in the rest of the world.
 

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The C bikes are jetted richer than the 49-state bikes, not leaner. Not as rich as the bikes in the rest of the world.




Just to clarify, the Cali PILOT circuits are set leaner before sealing. Actual jet sizes are the same.



Early Cali bikes have 114 mains, later TK's are 128's in my examples. As far as I know these are the same as 49 state models. The differences in part numbers between the Cali carb and the 49 state carbs may simply be the pilot settings, or it is possible that some of the passageways and orifices are of a different size. (Certainly not unheard of. Cali versions of common Solex and Weber carbs spring to mind).



All my TW carbs (I checked jet sizes in 6, 4 early, 2 late) are Cali versions, so I can't verify any other differences, but typically OVERALL jetting (with overlap) will be leaner here. Simply closing down the pilot screw and making it "tamperproof" may have been sufficient to satisfy C.A.R.B., and Yamaha had to distinguish it with a different part number to be in compliance.
 

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Just to clarify. In 2003 "R" and "RC" models, California bikes come with a #128 main, 288-14343-64-00. 49 state bikes come with a #125 main, 288-14343-63-00. Don't believe me, go look it up in the parts department. Maybe all the newer models have #128s, which would be a good thing because the #125 is simply too lean at low altitudes. California carbs are vented differently to incorporate the vapor canister. They may use the same carb body, I don't know.
 

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Just to clarify. In 2003 "R" and "RC" models, California bikes come with a #128 main, 288-14343-64-00. 49 state bikes come with a #125 main, 288-14343-63-00. Don't believe me, go look it up in the parts department. Maybe all the newer models have #128s, which would be a good thing because the #125 is simply too lean at low altitudes. California carbs are vented differently to incorporate the vapor canister. They may use the same carb body, I don't know.


Wasn't intendending to start a pizzin match. Sorry if I came off that way. I'm no "Know-it-all", more of a "Learn-whatever-ya-can".



All I have are Cali carbs. Depending on what fiche you Google up 1-3 different main jet sizes appear. If, for example the Cali pilot venturi orifice was restricted as opposed to 49-state carbs I'd have no way of knowing. Some sites even list a different diaghragm for Cali. Different rates, or just superceded part numbers? Who knows.



Sorry for the highjack. Maybe Qwerty and I could do some measuring one day for you Ebay carb buyers/ performance seekers.
 

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Wasn't intendending to start a pizzin match. Sorry if I came off that way. I'm no "Know-it-all", more of a "Learn-whatever-ya-can".



All I have are Cali carbs. Depending on what fiche you Google up 1-3 different main jet sizes appear. If, for example the Cali pilot venturi orifice was restricted as opposed to 49-state carbs I'd have no way of knowing. Some sites even list a different diaghragm for Cali. Different rates, or just superceded part numbers? Who knows.



Sorry for the highjack. Maybe Qwerty and I could do some measuring one day for you Ebay carb buyers/ performance seekers.


Maybe different years got different parts, too? Anywho, all the 2001 and up bikes make good use of the #125 jet at high altitudes and the #128 jet at low altitudes. The #132 jet used in the rest-of-the-world bikes is a tad rich, even at low altitude. If you have opened up the intake and/or exhaust, the #132 often works well. At extreme altitudes (over 9000 feet or so) a few holes in the airbox cover help, even with the #125 jet.
 
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