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Discussion Starter #1
So, I removed my carb entirely, swapped the stock main jet for a 130, added some shins to the needles, and turned the idle/air screw to 2.5 turns. Put everything back on, then installed the DG v2 slip on. It started up and idled fine. I took it for a test run, and it was sputtering bad, and dying constantly. I had to keep the throttle pretty open to keep it going, and ended up having to push it way up a hill... felt like it wasn’t getting enough... something (gas/air?).

It was cutting in/out when I was test riding it. Actually felt similar to how my RD felt in the past when the plug was going ... but the plug should be fine. I figure I must've done something else wrong :)

Idle didn’t seems to be a problem, just revving the engine. Thoughts? See video.[video]https://www.dropbox.com/s/y8oinytslxv3gwm/TW-Carb-Exhaust_Mod-Problem.MOV?dl=0[/video]

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I want to ride this weekend!!!!
 

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Maybe like a clogged jet or float level way off? I'd blow the jets out with compressed air. If still no luck I would consider reverting to stock and then making one change at a time. It's much easier to diagnose that way.
 

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Any help would be greatly appreciated. I want to ride this weekend!!!!
I just rejetted on Tuesday, 130M 34P and 2.5 turns out... mine would ride, and as soon as it warmed up a couple miles later would die, turns out I forgot to put fuel in my tank...

Definitely worth checking lol
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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Discussion Starter #6
‘Tis strange. Started her up this morning, idle fine, died when rev’d initially, got it going again, rev’d okay, was able to get it going I first gear, then after a few more moments it just bogged down and died again.

Gonna take the carb out again later (probably tomorrow) and see if I can figure it out.
 

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You did too many things at once. My recommendation is to always make one change at a time, with a test ride for effect between steps. Swapping all those parts, who the hell knows where things went wrong. If it were me, I'd put everything back to stock as it was before I opened up this can of worms, then test to see if it's back to the way it was. Then I'd start one step at a time. I see you didn't mention changing the pilot jet. That jet made the biggest difference in my bike's performance and I've moved on to the main, the shims and an air box mod. Each step was tested for effect. Took a while as I went up to 3 shims before I could tell I had overshot the optimum performance, which was two shims.
What your problem is, is anyone's guess. Maybe you didn't tighten the screws on the carb top after you messed installing shims. Maybe you didn't verify the needle moved smoothly, was seated right and that the CV boot was sealing right. Maybe the carb boot; front or rear, is not on the carb right and is air-leaking bad. You are gonna have to go back to square one just to eliminate any issues in the work as well as the parts now, in order to trouble shoot this right.
 

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I agree with the post above. I think you messed something up. Start over
 

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You did too many things at once. My recommendation is to always make one change at a time, with a test ride for effect between steps. Swapping all those parts, who the hell knows where things went wrong. If it were me, I'd put everything back to stock as it was before I opened up this can of worms, then test to see if it's back to the way it was. Then I'd start one step at a time. I see you didn't mention changing the pilot jet. That jet made the biggest difference in my bike's performance and I've moved on to the main, the shims and an air box mod. Each step was tested for effect. Took a while as I went up to 3 shims before I could tell I had overshot the optimum performance, which was two shims.
What your problem is, is anyone's guess. Maybe you didn't tighten the screws on the carb top after you messed installing shims. Maybe you didn't verify the needle moved smoothly, was seated right and that the CV boot was sealing right. Maybe the carb boot; front or rear, is not on the carb right and is air-leaking bad. You are gonna have to go back to square one just to eliminate any issues in the work as well as the parts now, in order to trouble shoot this right.
+++1!
Go back to stock and start over but absolutely only ONE (1) STEP AT A TIME!
 

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Who did you get the 130 from ?
G'day Collin. 130 main jet is part # item: 288-14343-65-00 . Available for ~$4.74 US plus another $10 or more in shipping from Boats.net
I may place an order for some jets to dilute the shipping costs. PM me if you want me to get you one and maybe I can drop it in an envelope & mail to Anglesey.
 

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Thought it might have come from a random supplier not known for “equivalent accuracy” on sizing

As for me, I prefer to get my “daily dose” of carb problems vicariously. The old adage “if it ‘aint broke, don’t fix it” seems to be working well for me so far, especially with regards to TW carbs, and I’m happy for it to stay that way

The “pick up” on the bumblebee was kinda nice, but as it had a slip on, plus a high compression piston, it perhaps needed re-jetting and a couple of shims. “Horses for courses” as they say – but you can get away without that stuff on Anglesey – it becomes more about maintenance than anything else – this ‘aint Moab, lol

As long as the bike will get you there and back again, that’s all I need on the Island – if I feel the need for more, I’ll simply take out the TW225

But thanks for the offer, it’s appreciated ….. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
UPDATE:

So I set the original 126 main jet back into place and removed the two additional shims on the needle. I had already installed the new DG exhaust, so that stayed in place, and I went ahead and turned the idle/air screw out 2.5 turns.

Bike fired right up—had choke out, but immediately was able to put it all the way in and it idle just dandy. I let the bike warm up for about 5min, then gave it a few revs, and it seemed good. Took it for a quick test drive around the neighborhood, and it's running again!! None of the same bog down issues. Who knows what the actual problem was. I blew compressed air through everything as I went, tried to insure nothing was clogged up. I also double checked that the needle could move, and the valve wasn't pinched or anything.

Next I'll try just the new jet or shims, and go one step at a time from there.

Any recommendations on the easiest way to handle the throttle assembly? That spring you have to set under tension is a big pain in the ass. If I could avoid having to mess with that each time ... :)

Thanks for the advice. I just jumped right in and should've taken the baby-step approach from the beginning (a little too eager/excited). It's been yeaaars since I last opened a carb, and that was for my 73 RD350, so a little different that the CV slide on the newer TWs.
 

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I'd recommend 2 needle shims.
It shouldn't require a 5 minute warm-up...
Try starting it with the shims, but without the choke.
Others will have different ideas.

What is the elevation around Austin...~1,000 ft.?
 

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My somewhat different approach to carb removal:

I do not remove individual throttle cables but remove the whole throttle wheel assembly. Spring gets a loop of very fine wire that dangles from the spring's hook. This wire loop I then grab with forceps and wind clockwise while re-installing throttle wheel. Works quicker than it takes to describe. Loop of wire remains dangling from spring and goes on all my rides with me.:p

I remove and re-install carb plus intake manifold together as a unit. This eliminates struggling with both rubber boots; carb plus manifold slide in and out from the right side and easily engages the boot from the air box. No struggling, lubing, prying, swearing, etc. Very easy on boot longevity too. Simple one hand job.

To gain as much clearance as possible I dismount turn signal flasher, remove choke plunger as well as plate holding throttle cables to carb. This I move out of way and tuck behind spark plug wire.

I also use slightly shorter manifold to head bolts and an Allen wrench cut down about 8mm shorter to more readily engage those bolts without banging into the float bowl. The cut off hex end is saved & then goes into a 1/4 inch drive socket creating another custom tool.
 

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Damn clever...thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'd recommend 2 needle shims.
It shouldn't require a 5 minute warm-up...
Try starting it with the shims, but without the choke.
Others will have different ideas.

What is the elevation around Austin...~1,000 ft.?
Yea, I’ll try the shims next. It didn’t need 5min, I just let it run for 5 before doing anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Thanks for the advice. Getting the carb in/out itself wasn’t too bad, but the throttle wheel assembly spring was a paint. Got it though!

The important thing is, it’s running again!

My somewhat different approach to carb removal:

I do not remove individual throttle cables but remove the whole throttle wheel assembly. Spring gets a loop of very fine wire that dangles from the spring's hook. This wire loop I then grab with forceps and wind clockwise while re-installing throttle wheel. Works quicker than it takes to describe. Loop of wire remains dangling from spring and goes on all my rides with me.


I remove and re-install carb plus intake manifold together as a unit. This eliminates struggling with both rubber boots; carb plus manifold slide in and out from the right side and easily engages the boot from the air box. No struggling, lubing, prying, swearing, etc. Very easy on boot longevity too. Simple one hand job.

To gain as much clearance as possible I dismount turn signal flasher, remove choke plunger as well as plate holding throttle cables to carb. This I move out of way and tuck behind spark plug wire.

I also use slightly shorter manifold to head bolts and an Allen wrench cut down about 8mm shorter to more readily engage those bolts without banging into the float bowl. The cut off hex end is saved & then goes into a 1/4 inch drive socket creating another custom tool.
 

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My somewhat different approach to carb removal:

I do not remove individual throttle cables but remove the whole throttle wheel assembly. Spring gets a loop of very fine wire that dangles from the spring's hook. This wire loop I then grab with forceps and wind clockwise while re-installing throttle wheel. Works quicker than it takes to describe. Loop of wire remains dangling from spring and goes on all my rides with me.:p

I remove and re-install carb plus intake manifold together as a unit. This eliminates struggling with both rubber boots; carb plus manifold slide in and out from the right side and easily engages the boot from the air box. No struggling, lubing, prying, swearing, etc. Very easy on boot longevity too. Simple one hand job.

To gain as much clearance as possible I dismount turn signal flasher, remove choke plunger as well as plate holding throttle cables to carb. This I move out of way and tuck behind spark plug wire.

I also use slightly shorter manifold to head bolts and an Allen wrench cut down about 8mm shorter to more readily engage those bolts without banging into the float bowl. The cut off hex end is saved & then goes into a 1/4 inch drive socket creating another custom tool.
This needs a tutorial with pics or vid. I fiddle with the carb too much and this sounds like it may be easier than my shitty method of carb removal every few weeks to play with jets and shims.
 
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