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Hi guys,

Some of you have read my thread on the starter and I thank you for they, hopefully getting the carb back tomorrow and cross fingers it's fires,

While trying to sort it I did what some of you suggested and used the rear axle to get the starter clutch off ( sweet tip btw) anyway now I have put it back and I can tell the wheel alignment is all over the place, what I really don't get is how the snails( think that's what they are called) are supposed to tension the chain but they are not attached to anything?? There is a small notch next to them like a nipple but not sure if that goes in one of the numbered holes or not, I should have paid more attention yes but at the time I was concentrating on getting the starter working haha!

Cheers once again

Craig

P.s I find search for similar topics but only chain tension ones came up and I just didn't understand them, have also checked the manual which just tells me to turn them to direction A clockwise but I don't get how this can tension and wheel align !
 

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The perimeter of the cam shaped "snails" ( can't think of a better name for them myself) have notches that engage the little nipples on each exterior side of the swing arm. By rotating, or advancing the cam shaped snails chain tension is increased or decreased. Engaging equal notches left and right should establish proper wheel alignment . However sometimes the notches need to be staggered in order to align wheel properly, sight down tire/chain/sproket to visually confirm alignment. I have not heard of any precise measuring technique to confirm alignment, just what I learned to call "rack of eye". Ignore the holes drilled through the snails
 

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...... Engaging equal notches left and right should establish proper wheel alignment . However sometimes the notches need to be staggered in order to align wheel properly, sight down tire/chain/sproket to visually confirm alignment. I have not heard of any precise measuring technique to confirm alignment.....

The operative word is should. In my case I found that the snails had to be one full number apart to get the axle aligned. What I did was take a piece of thin wire, make a bend in it which I placed in the center of the axle, then marked the other end where it centered on the swing arm bolt. On the right side you are not able to get a straight line of wire but it's close enough. There was over 1/4 inch difference until I moved one snail.
I could not actually see this while sighting the chain, but I noticed that the original sprocket at 4,000 miles had side plate wear on only one side.....there's a pic of it in my contribution to the dual sprocket thread.

I never noticed any weird handling, but it just seemed smart to correct it.
 

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If you take a look at this picture — you will see that by turning each adjuster “ring” (anti-clockwise in the pictures case) the outside diameter of the “ring gets wider as you go — forcing the wheel axle backwards and thus tightening the chain. If you set both of the adjusters to the same number, the wheel "should" be straight …………


adjuster.jpg


That's the theory anyway ..............
 

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Purple that picture is perfect thank you, I'm more of a visual learner anyway! I get it now thanks guys, I will get the chain tight and put them on the same number for now and get it running? Much appreciated
 

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Purple that picture is perfect thank you, I'm more of a visual learner anyway! I get it now thanks guys, I will get the chain tight and put them on the same number for now and get it running? Much appreciated
Not too tight! I believe the spec calls for around 1.2" to 1.5" slack when the bike is on the side stand. (Someone please correct me if I'm wrong on the slack measurement.)
 

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I know this is an old thread but for those new people just now reading it like me. There is an inexpensive tool you can buy that clamps on the sprocket and has an alignment rod that runs parallel to the chain. You adjust your snail cams or the screw type adjusters until the rod is perfectly parallel with the chain. Take note of the position numbers. Mine aren't equal. I noticed the factory techs put paint marker on the teeth of the snail where it was aligned at factory and they aren't matching from side to side but they do line up with the tool correctly. It's a 2 notch different from side to side. Left side is one notch below the 3, right side is one notch above the 3.
If you're a "frugal" person and like to make your own tools. A piece of narrow angle iron held flat against the sprocket face and long enough to run up alongside the chain can help you find a more ideal alignment without buying stuff.
 
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