TW200 Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Have one broken spoke on rear wheel, is this dangerous or can i ride until repaired? can you buy just one spoke or does have to buy a whole set and would you need to replace them all or just the broke one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,972 Posts
Yamaha only sells them as a set.Last time I checked they where around fifty bucks.Can you replace just the broken one? Yes the only problem is the rest may have been stressed and will break as well. I've chased broken spokes around and around the rim and have found it best to bite the bullet and just replace the whole set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
It always starts with just one. I was almost stranded miles from home as one turned into five and the wheel began to wobble. Slowly nursed the bike home and began to research online about how to replace them.



It really wasn't that tough. I replaced one at a time and snugged each one slightly. When I had them all in, the rim was pretty close to true. I put the axle across a couple boards and used a 12gage solid core wire bent to almost touch the rim. As I spun the rim I could see the rim move closer or further from the wire. Loosen a couple spokes, snug a couple and you're there.



Total project took about 4 hours.



Go for it.



Tim
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,664 Posts
Truing a spoked wheel is as much art as science. It takes some time and patience to learn, but persistence pays off. It really isn't that difficult, it simply requires persistence. Truing is one of those "magical abilities", like tuning a carb, that most people are simply too lazy to master. All it takes is persistence. Plenty of instruction available with a quick google search. Learn to true a wheel and tune a carb and profit from the knowledge doing the work for lazy people.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,516 Posts
Truing a spoked wheel is as much art as science. It takes some time and patience to learn, but persistence pays off. It really isn't that difficult, it simply requires persistence. Truing is one of those "magical abilities", like tuning a carb, that most people are simply too lazy to master. All it takes is persistence. Plenty of instruction available with a quick google search. Learn to true a wheel and tune a carb and profit from the knowledge doing the work for lazy people.




Sound advise I'd say!.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,521 Posts
The quote from Qwerty is certainly true. My thought however is, before we beat ourselves up, we need to realize that when talking "art" we are talking TIME... Perfecting a process to the point of "art" takes years. It can be roofing, building engines or using a back-hoe. To become an 'artist' seems to require an interest and a high level of dedication.





I have spent years repairing bicycles. I have trued and re-spoked many wheels. I think I became very good at truing but still not an artist.



I am of the opinion that the 'average Joe/Jill' can do a pretty 'ok' job of truing a spoke wheel if they fellow all of the basic guidelines presented in the many tutorials. Lacing a wheel is as well 'very doable' by common folk but will likely take a notable chunk out of your waking hours. Both tasks are best approach with a 'slow but steady' attitude.



Keep in mind, it is still the righty tighty, lefty loosey. What can throw you is the fact that most of the time you are looking at the nut (spoke nipple) from behind (tire side) instead of facing it (rim side).



Remember as well, if the spoke is attached to the left hub flange, tightening the nipple will pull the rim closer to that flange. Loosening that same nipple will reduce the 'pull' to that side and allow the spokes from the other side (hub flange) to assert more control/pull on the rim.



I agree, when one spoke breaks, likely many of the others are pretty fatigued. If you plan to keep the bike, replacing them all is the best thing to do. Gerry



 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top