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Discussion Starter #1
Want to do the standard carb mod for my newly acquired 2004. I am a complete newbie when it comes to working on the carb. Did some reading/searching and came up with the following part # for the 132.5 main jet: 288−14343−66 Went to Boats.net and Stadium Yamaha and it shows as unavailable. Anyone know of a place that stocks it and if so, is the part # still valid? Should I be looking for the part under a different bike like the TTR225? Also, how many washers/shims will I need for the needle (I am at sea level, 60-70 degree weather year round)? Thanks a bunch.
 

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132.5 may be a little much, I'd go with a 130 but for how inexpensive they are maybe get both to fine tune to your location...both are found at boats.net but you need to google search it in order to find them, as boats.net's website search engine doesn't return the result.



130

http://www.boats.net/parts/detail/yamaha/motorcycle/Y-288-14343-65-00.html

http://www.stadiumyamaha.com/pages/oemparts#/s/YAM//288-14343-65-00



132.5

http://www.boats.net/parts/detail/yamaha/Y-288-14343-66-00.html

http://www.stadiumyamaha.com/pages/oemparts#/s/YAM//288-14343-66-00



I'd get 0.030"-0.040" worth of shims, in 0.010" increments.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
132.5 may be a little much, I'd go with a 130 but for how inexpensive they are maybe get both to fine tune to your location...both are found at boats.net but you need to google search it in order to find them, as boats.net's website search engine doesn't return the result.



130

http://www.boats.net/parts/detail/yamaha/motorcycle/Y-288-14343-65-00.html

http://www.stadiumyamaha.com/pages/oemparts#/s/YAM//288-14343-65-00



132.5

http://www.boats.net/parts/detail/yamaha/Y-288-14343-66-00.html

http://www.stadiumyamaha.com/pages/oemparts#/s/YAM//288-14343-66-00



I'd get 0.030"-0.040" worth of shims, in 0.010" increments.


Thanks for the links and the advice on the shims. From what I've read (which is a lot) the general consensus is that the 132.5 is the way to go for bikes at sea level. I've seen at least 2 postings from people who used the 130 and said they wished they had used the 132.5. FWIW, I'm on the West Coast in San Francisco and always ride in 55+ degree weather. Also, my bike is always garaged so I don't have any real cold starts. Anyone else think the 132.5 would be too rich?
 

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Thanks for the links and the advice on the shims. From what I've read (which is a lot) the general consensus is that the 132.5 is the way to go for bikes at sea level. I've seen at least 2 postings from people who used the 130 and said they wished they had used the 132.5. FWIW, I'm on the West Coast in San Francisco and always ride in 55+ degree weather. Also, my bike is always garaged so I don't have any real cold starts. Anyone else think the 132.5 would be too rich?


I tried the 132.5 and it was too rich. I'm 177 feet above sea level, mostly warm weather, currently in the 90s.



As pgilles said, go ahead and get both, that way if in doubt, you can try the other one, without having to re-order.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I tried the 132.5 and it was too rich. I'm 177 feet above sea level, mostly warm weather, currently in the 90s.



As pgilles said, go ahead and get both, that way if in doubt, you can try the other one, without having to re-order.


Yes, I might just go ahead and purchase both. Since I am so new at this, I really don't want to go back in to swap them. I know it would be easy to do once I get the hang of the procedure to rotate the carb out 90 degrees, but I'm not really into tinkering. Your riding conditions of 177 feet above sea level and warmer temps sound like the perfect setup for a 130, which is why I'm liking the 132.5. As stated previously, I've run across at least 2 postings vouching for the 132.5 at sea level. Thanks for your input.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
FYI, seems like the new part # for the 132.5 main jet, at least according to Stadium Yamaha is: 288-14355-66-00. The "old" # is not available at either Boats.net or Stadium Yamaha. The new one is available at Boats.net, but not at Stadium.
 

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FYI, seems like the new part # for the 132.5 main jet, at least according to Stadium Yamaha is: 288-14355-66-00. The "old" # is not available at either Boats.net or Stadium Yamaha. The new one is available at Boats.net, but not at Stadium.


Yeah, there was a change. I'm sure if you called them with the old number they would present you with that superseded number. I couldn't think of it off the top of my head. Just found the link: http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/2596-tw-main-jets-and-crossovers/page__p__23212__hl__14355__fromsearch__1#entry23212



Every bike is different, but 177 feet is sea level for jetting purposes (the difference between 0' and 177' is neglible). Either jet will work, but get both just in case.



I'd start with either of the following:

0.020" shim with the 132.5.

0.030" shim with the 130.
 

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you could also try www.jetsrus.com the dont claim to be geniune yamaha parts but they do list about 50 or so jets for the tw200. ive tried three different jets from them and all worked as a jet should. the only reason i got three jets was to have them for fine tuning reasons. also if you call them they will drop the shipping charges by mailing then in a bubble wrap envelope for about 70 cents. i also got my shims from them. they list two different I.D. sizes, the smaller one was the size for my needle. prob the same for you.
 

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FYI, seems like the new part # for the 132.5 main jet, at least according to Stadium Yamaha is: 288-14355-66-00. The "old" # is not available at either Boats.net or Stadium Yamaha. The new one is available at Boats.net, but not at Stadium.
Some people claim 288−14343−66-00 is the new number, some places claim 288−14355−66-00 is the new number. Either will work. It's the OEM part for Australian TWs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, there was a change. I'm sure if you called them with the old number they would present you with that superseded number. I couldn't think of it off the top of my head. Just found the link: http://tw200forum.com/index.php?/topic/2596-tw-main-jets-and-crossovers/page__p__23212__hl__14355__fromsearch__1#entry23212



Every bike is different, but 177 feet is sea level for jetting purposes (the difference between 0' and 177' is neglible). Either jet will work, but get both just in case.



I'd start with either of the following:

0.020" shim with the 132.5.

0.030" shim with the 130.


Sounds like a plan, guess I will get both. Thanks for the shim suggestions. Just wish I had time to ride it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
you could also try www.jetsrus.com the dont claim to be geniune yamaha parts but they do list about 50 or so jets for the tw200. ive tried three different jets from them and all worked as a jet should. the only reason i got three jets was to have them for fine tuning reasons. also if you call them they will drop the shipping charges by mailing then in a bubble wrap envelope for about 70 cents. i also got my shims from them. they list two different I.D. sizes, the smaller one was the size for my needle. prob the same for you.


Thanks for the suggestion, I might give them a try.
 

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Bikes sold to hot, low altitude markets without environmental regs (Australia) got the 132.5. If you're riding is in more moderate climates, the 130 may be a better choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bikes sold to hot, low altitude markets without environmental regs (Australia) got the 132.5. If you're riding is in more moderate climates, the 130 may be a better choice.


Well, as stated previously, I am in a more moderate climate. Temps rarely go above 70 here in SF. I was under the impression that the colder it is, the larger the jet should be. Guess, it's the other way around?
 

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Well, as stated previously, I am in a more moderate climate. Temps rarely go above 70 here in SF. I was under the impression that the colder it is, the larger the jet should be. Guess, it's the other way around?


You're worrying too much about getting it perfect the first time. There's no golden rule, unless you find someone in San Fran as well. You have to interpolate from others' reviews and that'll get you in the ballpark for your jetting needs. I know you don't want fiddle with it, but that's jetting. Buy both jets, put in the larger one (I'll still recommend the 130, but I feel you may question what the 132 would feel like if you install the 130 first), shim the needle and give it a run. If you like it, keep it. If it bogs, make note of the conditions that it bogs (wide open throttle, cracking the throttle, midrange cruise surge, popping on decel, etc. etc.) and come back to us.



Fuel can be used for more power, and it can be used to keep the engine cooler and prevent pre-detonation. A really hot environment for an air-cooled bike may not need a 132 for the volume of oxygen it can bring in, but the additional fuel keeps the internal temps down (since the hot outside air doesn't do as well at cooling the bike). So, yes, lower temps usually require a larger main, but sometimes higher temps can require them as well.
 

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You're worrying too much about getting it perfect the first time. There's no golden rule, unless you find someone in San Fran as well. You have to interpolate from others' reviews and that'll get you in the ballpark for your jetting needs. I know you don't want fiddle with it, but that's jetting. Buy both jets, put in the larger one (I'll still recommend the 130, but I feel you may question what the 132 would feel like if you install the 130 first), shim the needle and give it a run. If you like it, keep it. If it bogs, make note of the conditions that it bogs (wide open throttle, cracking the throttle, midrange cruise surge, popping on decel, etc. etc.) and come back to us.



Fuel can be used for more power, and it can be used to keep the engine cooler and prevent pre-detonation. A really hot environment for an air-cooled bike may not need a 132 for the volume of oxygen it can bring in, but the additional fuel keeps the internal temps down (since the hot outside air doesn't do as well at cooling the bike). So, yes, lower temps usually require a larger main, but sometimes higher temps can require them as well.
Yup. #132.5 is a bit rich, even at sea level. Works fine riding across Death Valley in the summertime.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
You're worrying too much about getting it perfect the first time. There's no golden rule, unless you find someone in San Fran as well. You have to interpolate from others' reviews and that'll get you in the ballpark for your jetting needs. I know you don't want fiddle with it, but that's jetting. Buy both jets, put in the larger one (I'll still recommend the 130, but I feel you may question what the 132 would feel like if you install the 130 first), shim the needle and give it a run. If you like it, keep it. If it bogs, make note of the conditions that it bogs (wide open throttle, cracking the throttle, midrange cruise surge, popping on decel, etc. etc.) and come back to us.



Fuel can be used for more power, and it can be used to keep the engine cooler and prevent pre-detonation. A really hot environment for an air-cooled bike may not need a 132 for the volume of oxygen it can bring in, but the additional fuel keeps the internal temps down (since the hot outside air doesn't do as well at cooling the bike). So, yes, lower temps usually require a larger main, but sometimes higher temps can require them as well.


Yesterday night was my first extended ride on it and also the 1'st opportunity to get it above 25mph. Felt really sluggish, especially at lower RPM's, even when fully warmed up. Midrange was also sluggish, I'd twist the throttle at least halfway and I'd get lots of hesitation/bogging down. Never quite opened up. With the odometer at only 600 miles for a 2004 and an unknown/questionable service history, I just assumed that the carb would be all gunked up.



Well, got a chance to get into the bottom of the carb this afternoon just to do a "lazy man's" cleaning (90 degree turn, top of carb untouched). Turns out that the main and pilot jets were both very clean, could see daylight through the small holes. Very little residue in the float bowl. Drilled out the idle mixture cover and adjusted to 2 1/4 turns out. Took a fairly long time, but 2'nd time around will be a breeze. Didn't notice much of a difference in performance from before, but then again I didn't change out the main jet either. Still sluggish throughout the low/mid range. Could the gas is bad? Maybe I should have drained the tank before refilling last night. Oh well. Next step is to swap out the main jet. I'll take your recommendation and go with the 130 for now. BTW, can I shim the needle w/o removing the carb (only obstacle I can potentially see is getting the needle out)? Probably won't be until next week though since the part is an order only item from the local dealer. Thanks again for your input.
 

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Have you noticed easier cold starting?



E10 can go bad in a matter of days. The alcohol settles out. The result is E100 in the bottom of the tank and a low octane E0 floating above, where the petcock draws from when in the "ON" position. Not to mention the ethanol's affinity for water, which would be my guess is the problem due to the high humidity common in the Bay area. You think it runs crappy now, kust wait until you flip it to "RES" and start sucking that wet E100 off the bottom of the tank. I'll be surprised if it runs at all.



In the real world, the separated gas and alcohol kind of get stirred together enough to provide widely variable fuel quality during a ride. I'd drain the tank and dump the gas in the car where it will be highly diluted.



The needle is accessable by rotating the carb.
 

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Have you noticed easier cold starting?



E10 can go bad in a matter of days. The alcohol settles out. The result is E100 in the bottom of the tank and a low octane E0 floating above, where the petcock draws from when in the "ON" position. Not to mention the ethanol's affinity for water, which would be my guess is the problem due to the high humidity common in the Bay area. You think it runs crappy now, kust wait until you flip it to "RES" and start sucking that wet E100 off the bottom of the tank. I'll be surprised if it runs at all.



In the real world, the separated gas and alcohol kind of get stirred together enough to provide widely variable fuel quality during a ride. I'd drain the tank and dump the gas in the car where it will be highly diluted.



The needle is accessable by rotating the carb.


The bike actually starts/idles fine, both before and after the idle screw adjustment. How would I drain the tank (never done it)? Thanks for the info re: needle access, looks like it'll be easy to shim it. Now just have to get the main jets ordered.
 

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Several ways to drain the tank. Easiest is to remove the tank from the bike and turn it over. Makes it easy to add half a pint of fresh gas, swirl, and pour out more crud.



I have an aluminum tube that slips into a siphon hose that works well to "vacuum" crud out of the bottom of the tank. If I can't get the crud out before the tank goes dry I'll let the tank I siphon into settle a few minutes, then dump some back into the tank and chase more gunk. If you siphon, remember to drain both sides of the hump over the frame.



If you attach a long piece of fuel line to the petcock and flip it to reserve that will drain the tank into a can. Well, almost. You'll need to lay the bike down on the left side to dump the fuel on the other side of the frame hump over to the petcock side.I don't generally recommend darining through the petcock unless you plan on removing the petcock to clean the filters afterwards. You'll still have crud in your tank that will need to be washed out, even after removing the petcock.
 

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Several ways to drain the tank. Easiest is to remove the tank from the bike and turn it over. Makes it easy to add half a pint of fresh gas, swirl, and pour out more crud.



I have an aluminum tube that slips into a siphon hose that works well to "vacuum" crud out of the bottom of the tank. If I can't get the crud out before the tank goes dry I'll let the tank I siphon into settle a few minutes, then dump some back into the tank and chase more gunk. If you siphon, remember to drain both sides of the hump over the frame.



If you attach a long piece of fuel line to the petcock and flip it to reserve that will drain the tank into a can. Well, almost. You'll need to lay the bike down on the left side to dump the fuel on the other side of the frame hump over to the petcock side.I don't generally recommend darining through the petcock unless you plan on removing the petcock to clean the filters afterwards. You'll still have crud in your tank that will need to be washed out, even after removing the petcock.


Thanks Querty, you've been a great resource in helping me out on both of my issues (here and in my rear brake pulsing problem in a separate thread). Sounds like there might be a lot of crap in my tank.
 
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