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I'm sure it'll be a nice bike, but it's HEAVY (520 lbs) and will have a fairly tall seat. My choice is still the Tiger 800 XCx (470 lbs) if you want to do lots of off-road. If only light off-road, the new V-Strom 1000 would be my pick.
 

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As owner of a BMW Dakar, I'm partial to them. They are expensive, but only brand new. I bought mine, a 2003, in 2008 with 2,700 miles on it for $2,500. The housing bubble burst and a contractor had to sell his toys. I was in the right spot at the right time, but still, used bikes are the better deal. Lots of 'old guys' reverting to their second childhood who have the dough, find out they aren't 30-something any more. (Not that ANY TW200 owner falls into that category.)

First photo; Lost Coast
Second photo; somewhere near Lassen National Park (I think...)

2 weeks at a time, no schedule, no timetable. Just ride and when late afternoon rolls around, find some water and set up a camp for the night.



 

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The Dakar is a nice bike. A friend here bought a wrecked one about a year or so ago and I was the one to rebuild it for him, so I got to know it quite intimately. His was a 2006. It was a LOT like my DR650 but with a smoother motor thanks to the EFI and about 70 lbs more weight... but really was a good bike. It's a shame he sold it cheap and I didn't have the money to buy it, because I would have.
 

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The 650 Wee Strom is a pretty darn good all 'rounder, but I think the author might be right about the Super 10 in this comparison. Everyone has a different idea of what an adventure bike or adventure riding is, but the article seems to be focused on the big bore 90/10 street oriented ADV bikes. The Wee rightfully gets left out of that group because of what 85mph+ cruising speeds does to passing power and fuel economy on that bike.

The S10 is probably the least sexy bike on the list, but that's also what makes it a great tourer. Solid, tractable, reliable, without any pretense of being a rally racer.

The author goes on and on about cruise control, but the feature that really matters on big-mile tourers is a shaft drive. Shaft drive makes life so much easier, I honestly can't understand lumping chain drive and shaft drive bikes into the same category as the author has done in the article.

I can see the V-Strom 1000 being a good choice for the budget minded, or the KTM 1190 or 1290 being a good choice for the weekend warrior performance junkie, but for big touring I think the Super Tenere might actually be the under-appreciated one to beat.
 

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At the very least, the definition of an adventure motorcycle is one you can do repairs away from civilization, not just get away from civilization. Reading all those 'doo-dads', I'd have a hard time admitting those are true adventure rides. You classified them better with a description of 'big mile tourer'. Even the author of the article refers to them as touring and that the lack of cruise control on the Honda eliminates them from the Adventure class. I think he's confusing the two riding genres; touring and adventure.
 

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Damn things all look like "Crotch Rockets"....
 

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I like em all. :D Like people are saying it truly depends on what you are going to use the bike for. I know from years of riding a big GS it really was a challenge in rough off road situations and I'm not really a small guy. I do love the look of the new AT though, it is very pleasing to my eye. I've seen some videos of what the pro riders can do with the new AT off road, but it will remain to be seen what a regular guy can accomplish. I'm hoping to get one in the spring so maybe I will just find out first hand. Everything is relative. A lot of folks consider the KLR to be a heavy bike, but I don't find it to be so personally.
 

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How did they compile that list and note vote or mention the Kawasaki KLR650. It's the quintessential adv bike in my opinion.

I would love to see Kawasaki up date the old girl with fuel injection and a better cam chain tensioner but really it's a solid machine for those wishing to get out there and ride were ever they wish. If I didn't need the two up ability of my Victory a KLR would likely be the bike parked next to my TW200. It may not be the best performer or the most tricked out. But in all reality it will get you were you want to go at a price that in the adventure bike category can't be beat. And to me anyways Cost is an Inportant feature in a bike that in all likelyhood will end up laying down for a dirt nap at some point lol.

I have owned a 2007 WeeStrom in the past and it was a good well rounded bike. But having taken it off road I assure you it's a bike far better suited to the street. I even found it to be a bit nervous on gravel roads more so than the V-star cruiser before it.
 

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What bugs the heck out of me....is all these folks that buy "so-called" Adventure Bikes......like the R12GS, the KTM1190 A, the new Honda Africa twin, the Yamaha S10....etc, etc, etc, and they NEVER take it off-road or Adventure riding.

Okay, Rule # 1......it is THEIR bike, and they can ride it wherever they want to, and call it whatever they want to.

So, if buying a $ 15,000.00 to $ 25,000.00 motorcycle, and calling it an Adventure Bike, makes you feel better about yourself, as if....having that parked in your garage is going to assist you in living vicariously through the written words of riders that really do travel the world........then go for it, and have fun in your dreams.

But......(and I have voiced this opinion before on this forum).....it makes no sense to "me" to pay that much for a bike, that the magazines label as being an Adventure Bike, and then you never take it off-road, or travel the world.

Secondly, having owned a LOT of these Adventure Bikes, the biggest lesson I learned from owning 1200cc dual-sport bikes, is that a 1000 cc to 1200 cc bike should NOT be used when riding off-road, or 8 to 12 hours a day on gravel roads, or dirt roads, when the relative speeds on those roads dictate the bike should be ridden at 40 to 60 mph. The larger displacement is wasted, and the engine is either lugged down, or the bike is ridden in a lower gear, to find that sweet-spot in the engine, for all day work on those roads.

I am adamant that a true Adventure Bike should have no more than 800 cc, and preferably in the 400 cc to 700 cc range, so that it can much easily be ridden off-road, and for those 20 days that you ride through South America, or that 2 weeks you spend in Alaska and the Yukon, you can ride the bike at the correct speeds on those roads, and not be lugging the engine down, or....having to drop a gear or two just to find the sweet-spot of the engine.

Having owned a 2002 Honda Varadero 1000...and a 2003 Honda Africa twin 750...and a 2005 BMW R12GS...and a 2012 Yamaha Super Tenere', and...having ridden on all 7 continents on this planet, the only bike in todays market that "I" would even consider buying as a true Adventure Bike, is:

2015 Suzuki V-Strom 650 XT-ABS Adventure.

Suzuki Cycles - Product Lines - Cycles - Products - V-Strom 650 - 2015 - DL650XA
Boy, this hits it. I had an R1200GS...I got because it was a demo that was marked down, and the previous year's. And because at the time I bought the BMW myth...of bulletproof durability.

Unlike many owners, especially of a certain Milwaukee brand...I did ride it. I took it, Michigan to South Dakota as part of my job; and then South Dakota to Dallas; and then back to Michigan. Where eventually I sold it, with some help from ADVrider. By that time I was out of work and had an episode of what might have been phlebitis, going through Missouri - five days after the Joplin disaster. I needed medical help; there was none; and my only transportation was this enormous, frightfully heavy and high motorcycle.

I took it that the Almighty was sending a message: You ain't a kid anymore, my son. Things can happen and probably will.

So I sold; did okay; but then I sized up what I'd used that machine for. I don't think I put fifty miles on gravel with it. I NEVER rode in loose sand - I'd sooner pogo-stick in a sinkhole. If that thing got away it was gonna HURT. And if I had to stand it up myself...odds were, I couldn't.

I didn't need an "adventure" machine and frankly, by this point, they were scaring me. I went the other way. The TW is a trip back in that direction, although I bought it for entirely different reasons. But I've used my TW more on dirt and gravel then ever the GS; and I've got a LOT more confidence in being able to handle what might come of it.
 

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Interestingly enough, I have ridden the big GS on woods trails and once even took it off a jump. I learned to handle it just fine. BUT, I agree with what is being said. Lighter and smaller is better if you travel in remote places. I'm not agreeing necessarily with the Wee selection, but I'm agreeing with the principle of small and light. One of the reasons I'm such a big Austin Vince fan. They use small caliber used bikes and just make due. I'm impressed by that. Personally, and I've thought about it a bit, if I was to take a trip like that I might seriously consider rigging panniers and protection on a fairly stock Suzuki DR-Z400S.
 

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At the very least, the definition of an adventure motorcycle is one you can do repairs away from civilization, not just get away from civilization. Reading all those 'doo-dads', I'd have a hard time admitting those are true adventure rides. You classified them better with a description of 'big mile tourer'. Even the author of the article refers to them as touring and that the lack of cruise control on the Honda eliminates them from the Adventure class. I think he's confusing the two riding genres; touring and adventure.
I'm with SkiPro on this...and there is only one answer for me.

no ABS
no traction control
no fuel injection
no water cooling/radiator
no Canbus electrics
and easy enough for an old geezer to pick up.

And the key words in the title of the article are: "Which is the best buy..."

Brand new for $6,500 U.S...or much less in a lightly used version.



Jb
 

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That has to be the STUPIDEST idea that anyone has ever come up with...in the last 5 years.
You obviously don't watch CSPAN.

As for the under seat tank of the NC700, you are correct I've never ridden one and don't have any familiarity with the configuration. However, the NC700 seems to get rave reviews all over the place, largely due to it's tractable qualities and because of it's very low center of gravity. I can't really imagine fueling would be much more of a hassle than me having to remove my big tank bag to take on fuel if a person packed intelligently based upon the bikes configuration. All that being said, I of course, bought a KLR. :D
 
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