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Lauren's home for two weeks from Hawaii and she's interested in learning to ride a motorcycle. She has been riding Scooters now for two years so I'm hoping she has the skills necessary to easily adapt to the TW. I figured I let her watch a few videos on first time riders. Teaching her the clutch is my main concern so I thought I would ask you all for tips. I surely don't want her to experience Whiskey Throttle.


 

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Put the bike in third to begin with - first is too low to learn the clutch - gives you time to get the feel of the clutch without the bike climbing the nearest tree .....
 

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The people I have helped all seemed to let the clutch out slowly until it starts to move, then release it quickly the rest of the way, resulting in a stall or jerky take off. Constant reminders to keep releasing slowly ALL the way through engagement were needed in the beginning. A slight downhill makes it easier also, but once they start "getting it", turn them around for uphill clutch practice.
 

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If she rides a scooter she will have "throttle control". She can use the front brake while learning to use the clutch -- scooters only have hand brakes I think -- and can learn to use the foot brake later.

With scooter experience I think the only thing that really needs to be learned is throttle / clutch coordination. Should be easy. Keep us posted.
 

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No worries on a TW, it won't do any of that to get a crash. A top speed of about 10 in first if you fully rap it out. It still won't shoot up in the air and fly over your head.
 

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A simple sport type (clutch and shifter) four-wheeler is a great learning tool for newbies to learn taking off from a stop in first. No worries about balance (turning or falling over). Even better if converted to twist throttle. And you can sit behind them without all the craziness that will happen on a two-wheeler.
 

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That video reminded me of attempting to teach my older sister how to ride our Dad's little 250 Yamaha street bike. I explained everything and she did great until she went to stop and didn't realize that the clutch needed to be pulled to stop. Luckily the bike fell over and no one was hurt. Funny memory now, but I don't think she ever tried a motorcycle again.
The TW seems like a great bike to learn on. Good luck.
 

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Some of the people in that video were brain damaged before they ever let out the clutch.
When I learned it was when I bought a BMW R-26. I had no lessons but the guy who sold it showed me how to start it and told me the gear pattern.
I push it into the street and started it up. I killed it twice. Not wanting to kill it again, I revved it up before letting out the clutch. The bike ran partially out from under me
but I am stubborn and wouldn't let go. My chest was on the saddle and my feet dragging behind. Sliding back into this position involuntarily opened the throttle. I was going down the street in this position dragging my toes out behind but would not let go. I did a horizontal chin-up to get my crotch onto the saddle, then one at a time brought my feet to the pegs. I sat up and clicked into second gear. I was riding and began the 5 mile ride home. I was a biker now. Before the day was over I had done my first wheelie and had my first injury crash. Huge raspberry abrasion on one leg. Massive wash with iodine at a girlfriends house and I was back out on the road. There were no riding schools or classes in those days. It was crash and learn all the way for new riders and Darwinism selected who would become a biker and who would not.
Nowdays I watch new riders taking rider education courses and just wish they had those in my day.
 
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