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Discussion Starter #1
I know some of you have seen the setup I have on the truck of mine with the boat winch to lift bikes and such to load on the flatbed. Well I thought I would get lazy and put an electric one on. Here goes, installed a 1500lb Warn on the boom, wired it up and was happy to just push a button and lift my toys onboard. Just one problem. First time I picked up a bike, a 1500 Kawasaki Vulcan, which I had loaded many times with the boat winch, the Warn failed dropping the bike about 3ft. Luckily my sister was operating the winch and I had ahold of the bike guiding it up. No damage was incured, but I sure disapointed in the Warn. Even with a one pulley purchase thereby cutting line pull in half it still stripped out the gears.

Admittedly the winch was full of line and they rate line pull on the first wrap, but the winch should have stalled before taking out the gears. Lesson learned, picked up a 3500lb winch today.
 

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Randall;

when you say "with a one pulley purchase":
does that pulley remain stationary (say, up on the arm); while the bike is raised towards it and lowered away from it?
Or; is the pulley down at the bike, moving up in the same direction and speed as the bike when lifting - and down in the same direction and speed of the bike when lowering?

joe
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Randall;

when you say "with a one pulley purchase":
does that pulley remain stationary (say, up on the arm); while the bike is raised towards it and lowered away from it?
Or; is the pulley down at the bike, moving up in the same direction and speed as the bike when lifting - and down in the same direction and speed of the bike when lowering?

joe
I have a lead pulley at the end of the boom and a pulley on the pulling end hooked to the bike. The line goes to the lead pulley, down to the purchase pulley and back to the end of the boom giving it two lines down to the lifting pulling. It gives it a double advantage less the friction of the pulleys. The bike weighs around 650, so using a 1500lb winch and giving it a 2to1 advantage or 3000lb capability shouldn't fail picking up the weight of the bike. Like I said before, the winch should have stalled before taking out the gears.
 

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Yep, sounds like you got a defective one. With the weight dropping to a little over 325 lbs, that 1500 lb winch should have had no problem (I would think). Glad neither you nor the bike sustained any damage.

Are you sure that as it was being lifted, you didn't here your sister saying "hey, what does this button do?" ........... don't tell her I said that!
 

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The pulley at the boom tip is a fairlead. The pulley that moves with the bike to give 2 to 1 advantage is called the runner.
When figuring mechanical advantage with a pulley system, (no matter how many pulleys), the advantage is how many falls at the moveable block.
A fall is the rope. Hence the rope goes through the top block for direction. It becomes a fall as it goes down to the block at the bike.
It is still called a fall as it goes back up to the top where it is anchored. This makes two falls at the movable block so two to one advantage minus 10%
for friction. The 10 % is variable depending on the construction of your pulley is constructed, Ball bearings, diameter of pulley etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The pulley at the boom tip is a fairlead. The pulley that moves with the bike to give 2 to 1 advantage is called the runner.
When figuring mechanical advantage with a pulley system, (no matter how many pulleys), the advantage is how many falls at the moveable block.
A fall is the rope. Hence the rope goes through the top block for direction. It becomes a fall as it goes down to the block at the bike.
It is still called a fall as it goes back up to the top where it is anchored. This makes two falls at the movable block so two to one advantage minus 10%
for friction. The 10 % is variable depending on the construction of your pulley is constructed, Ball bearings, diameter of pulley etc.
Good words for the system. I guess it just depends on what part of the country you are from as to what you call each pulley or line. My terms are different from yours but mean the same. I remember when in training in S forces a question was asked what skookum meant. I answered and from that he knew which part of the country I was from.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok fellows, round 2. I just took the boom off and I don't think the gears failed. The case is cracked where the engagement pin goes into the release mechanism. Chances are when I had my sis hit the button it could be the engagement wasn't fully in. Will know more when I tear into it. Right now as I bought the bigger winch and it is going on today, the little one will be in it's corner for a bit.

And one more thing, it has a braking system built in to this one.
 

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My terminology is nautical. I was a chief bos'ns mate and as such a professional rigger aboard ships. Pulleys are blocks in my language, and the ropes that go between them are falls. BTW, In My language ropes are made of metal wire and Lines are made of fiber such as manila, hemp, sisal, nylon, Dacron , etc. This makes it difficult to speak of these things to landlubbers, ( non nautical people), because of the different names of the items.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Have to laugh in a good way to the sailor as the loggers were taught to splice by sailors. Somehow in the translations, rope is the fiber here and line is cable although I have heard the term wire rope.

If I ever told a logger to take that rope and splice it as there are none on a logging site, I would have been looked at sideways. Yes we do call our pulleys "blocks", but I am sure a lot of folks in other parts of the country understand a pulley and would wonder what a block is. I think "keep it simple" applies here.
 

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I have also been a logger so I am bilingual in speaking about rigging. For instance when a wire rope or cable starts showing broken strands, to a logger they are jaggers, to a sailor they are fish hooks. They both take skin off of your hands and sometimes can actually kill you, like yanking you overboard, or under a turn of moving logs.
There are even differences among loggers names for the same thing. For instance rigging slinger and choker setter.
One works a high lead show and the other behind a cat but they both do the same basic job, which is to fasten steel wire rope onto a log.
I have also been a commercial fisherman so I know the difference between a gurdy and a gypsy head, and I know how to put the frog on the punken.
 
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